Posts Tagged ‘workshop’

Cultivating Sustainability: Learn to engage people in sustainability

Posted in Events by timc on October 29th, 2013

27 November , 2013
9:30 amto4:00 pm

Cultivating Sustainability is a 1-day workshop which provides sustainability advocates with insights, models and tools to engage and inspire people for sustainable action. This workshop will assist you to

This workshop will assist you to:

Identify what people need in order to embrace sustainability
Target your efforts and resources to the points of most leverage
Incorporate psychological principles to your sustainability programs
Communicate about sustainability more effectively
Meet others who are dealing with similar challenges and share ideas and success stories.

Presented by Tim Cotter, a psychologist specialising in the psychology of sustainability.

When: Wed. November 27th, 2013. 9.30am – 4.00pm

Where: Melbourne, Venue to be confirmed

Online Registration and Further Info at www.awake.com.au

Costs:

Earlybirds! Register and pay before the end of October and receive a 20% discount

For-profits $300pp ($240pp before October 31)

NFP/Govt $250pp ($200pp before October 31)

Indiv’s/Community Groups $160pp ($128pp before October 31)


Learn Successful Worm Farming!

Posted in Events by EcoCentre on May 15th, 2013

18 May , 2013
11:00 amto12:30 pm

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Saturday 18 May, 11am-12.30pm

Want bucket loads of worm castings, like these ones collected from EcoCentre? In this workshop you’ll learn how to set up and maintain a top-performing worm farm.

Everything you ever wanted to know about how to wrangle worms and turn your organic kitchen waste into garden enriching compost.

The workshop will be run by industry professional Richard Thomas. Richard is a highly sought-after expert who not only runs a worm nursery in Melbourne but who also consults in this field in developing countries.  This workshop uses active, demonstration wormfarms and covers theory and troubleshooting.

Bookings ESSENTIAL. Cost $15 EcoCentre ‘green’ members/$25 others

www.trybooking.com/CTXM
9534  0670 / paula@ecocentre.com

Venue: Port Phillip EcoCentre
Cnr Blessington & Herbert Streets, St Kilda
(in St Kilda Botanic Gardens)


Potential Urban Orchards: City of Melbourne’s Urban Forest Consultations

Posted in Events, Seeking by Kate Archdeacon on April 4th, 2013

6 April , 2013
10:00 amto11:00 am
20 April , 2013
10:00 amto11:00 am
4 May , 2013
10:00 amto11:00 am

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Photo: Roots to Fruit

If we want council to consider productive street trees in Melbourne, we need to ask for them – that was the message when some of the Urban Forest team participated in the EcoCity Food Forum a couple of weeks ago, and it was also clear that they are really keen to get diverse and plentiful public feedback on the Urban Forest Strategy.  There are three more workshops left to run in the consultation process.  Feedback can also be posted directly to the Urban Forest website.

From the Urban Forest Conversation website:

We invite you to share your thoughts and opinions about the development of the City of Melbourne’s Urban Forest.

The City’s Urban Forest Strategy provides a robust framework for the evolution and longevity of our urban forest but what will that look like at an individual street level? Join the conversation to influence the plan for your neighbourhood’s trees. In 2013, we are developing the plans for the urban forest in Carlton, East Melbourne, South Yarra and the CBD.

Join the conversation online through this forum, post your comments on our urban forest map or participate in a workshop to influence the plans for your neighbourhood’s trees. You can register for a workshop via the key links on the right hand side of the Urban Forest page.

Register for Upcoming Workshops:

 

Food for thought? Some thoughts on productive trees in public space:

“Edible Street Verge Gardening is something that has been going on for the past 20 years or so in our cities but is now capturing the public imagination such that the number of plantings is rapidly increasing.  For advocates of edible landscaping in our cities, this is good news but for local government the practice can be confusing. What has become apparent during the recent upsurge in the popularity of edible footpath planting is that a set of design and planting guidelines are desperately needed.  Most verge plantings to date have been created by gardeners who know what they are doing. The possibility emerging from the current boost in popularity is that those less knowledgeable will create gardens with inappropriate plants and without considering other footpath users.”

“The biggest objections to planting food-bearing plants in public spaces have always been, and will likely continue to be, maintenance and aesthetics.  Public officials are quick to point out that edibles are messy and difficult to maintain, precluding their use in the urban environment. … These concerns are often based largely on misconception and subjectivity.  still, many of these concerns can be addressed with an understanding that maintenance and aesthetics can be balanced by choosing certain plants over others, mixing edibles with ornamentals, utilizing existing maintenance staff and methods, and properly gauging community demand for fresh, local produce.”

“The City of Yarra recognises the importance of urban agriculture in supporting community sustainability, especially in times of changing climate and the myriad of associated issues such as food security due to diminishing oil supplies. Neighbourhood gardening using productive trees1 is recognised by Council as a form of Urban Agriculture that can be used by local communities to create sustainable, resilient and liveable neighbourhoods in an effective and meaningful way. Planting productive trees is considered by Council to be an effective, means of inspiring and enabling community food production in the City of Yarra by generating environmental, social and economic wellbeing from the ground up – created for and by local people. Planting productive trees can be initiated, operated and maintained by the local community with support from Council. Council’s Guidelines and registration process will assist in making neighbourhood gardening with productive trees effective, enjoyable and safe for all.”

“We’ve all seen trees over laden with fruit that the trees owner isn’t eating. Generally the tree is in somebody’s garden where it can’t be reached from the street, and in these days of lost community and increasing crime it’s kind of hard to randomly approach people for fruits. There must be a way that more community food can be grown. There are many families where the kids don’t get enough nutrition, especially in the form of fruit, where dinner is straight from the freezer into the microwave. Yuck! I know of two parks where fruit is grown for the public to eat. One is Gourley Park in East Freo, the other is King William Park in South Freo. There must be scope for more. I know some people are concerned about fruit fly (and others who unfortunately aren’t concerned enough), but not all fruit attracts those rotten pests. It’s already common to see tasty loquats ignored in gardens , so we don’t need to add to the burden of fruit fly. There’s plenty of other varieties to choose from and if it was well known that the fruit was available and folk were educated about when to pick it there wouldn’t be lots of rotten fruit around to attract nasties. […]

Free fruit could be the only fruit so what can be grown that wouldn’t cause problems? Some nuts would be a good start. Almonds are good and grow well around here. Macadamias do well in some areas around Perth. They’ll also feed black cockatoos. Bunya pine nuts are pretty good, but need cordoning off in autumn (as they do in Hyde Park, Perth) because people have been killed when the huge cones of seeds drop on their head! Not a tree to sit under at the best of times with their wickedly spiny leaves, but much more useful that its oft’ planted relative the Norfolk Island pine!! Many kinds of citrus would be suitable with the right care. […] There’s a fantastic tree called Ziziphus jujuba, commonly called Chinese date, which grows numerous little apple like fruit about the size of olives. They are a tough species which provide a common meeting place in some desert countries, providing shade and food that can be eaten fresh or preserved for later use. Olives are good public trees with very useful fruit (though obviously not good for hand to mouth browsing). There are a few bush tucker foods that could be grown too, such as muntries/muntari (Kunzea pomifera), a creeping member of the Myrtaceae family, which has pretty white flowers followed by tasty little apple like berries. It grows on the east coast and is often sold in Perth. Quandongs are a native species which has deep red skins on pretty nuts. Some bush foods require some retraining of the taste buds, but they are generally pest and disease free, and don’t need help once established. Obviously somebody would need to be looking after these things, but if parks had more community input and a little council money to feed the trees a few times a year and have them drip irrigated they could become important meeting and snacking places. Parks could even be designed to be useful on purpose!!”

 

 


Business and Human Rights Workshop: Introduction to the UN Guiding Principles

Posted in Events by unaavic on March 8th, 2013

26 March , 2013
9:00 amto1:00 pm

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The UNAA Business and Human Rights Workshops build capacity to monitor and manage corporate human rights risks and impacts, providing practical guidance on how to integrate human rights considerations into everyday business practices. They provide a practical learning forum for practitioners from all stakeholder groups, on the international and domestic standards and tools available to help prevent and redress business related human rights harm.  The workshops, held in partnership with Allens, are facilitated by Vanessa Zimmerman, Business and human rights expert and former Legal Advisor to the United Nations Special Representative on Business and Human Rights.

Who are the workshops for?
The workshops are an essential training program for corporate responsibility and sustainability managers, investors, governance, risk and compliance managers, and corporate lawyers on the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles – the global standard of practice on business and human rights. They invite business, government and NGOs professionals wanting to learn more about business and human rights and how to apply the UN Guiding Principles in practice. Participants who attend the entire series of 6 workshops are exposed to a full package of learning on the business responsibility to respect and will be well equipped to manage business related human rights risks.

Workshop 1 Details:

Workshop 1: Business and Human Rights: Introduction to the UN Guiding Principles
Date: Tuesday 26 March
Time: 8.30am Registration, 9am to 1pm Workshop
Venue: Hosted by Allens, Level 37, 101 Collins St, Melbourne VIC 3000
RSVP Deadline: 5 pm, Tuesday 19 March

Registration fees:
Business/Government: $520 +GST per workshop or 6 workshops for $440 +GST each

Non-profit organisation: $370 +GST per workshop or 6 workshops for $330+GST each

Places are limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment. To register go to: http://www.unaavictoria.org.au/education-advocacy/business-human-rights-workshops/

Register for complete series of 6 workshops before 5pm, 19 March 2013 to take advantage of discounted workshop package.

  • Workshop 2: Corporate Human Rights Policy Development Tuesday 9 April
  • Workshop 3: Corporate Human Rights Due Diligence: Assessment and integration of human rights impacts Tuesday 14 May
  • Workshop 4: Corporate Human Rights Due Diligence: Tracking and communicating human rights performance Tuesday 4 June
  • Workshop 5: Addressing Adverse Human Rights Impacts: Managing human rights related complaints, disputes and grievances Tuesday 2 July
  • Workshop 6: Managing Human Rights in the Supply Chain and Other Business Relationships Tuesday 6 August


Social Enterprise Conference: Global Shifts 2012

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on November 12th, 2012

12 December , 2012 8:30 amto14 December , 2012 7:00 pm

Global Shifts 2012 – Social Enterprise Conference

Bringing together change-makers, entrepreneurs and high-profile leaders from Australia and abroad the conference will discuss, debate and demonstrate ways in which pushing the boundaries of existing business models can contribute to positive social change.

The conference builds on the groundswell of activity and commitment in the social enterprise space in our region and beyond, and aims to coalesce this energy into a powerful movement for change.

Held over three days the conference will not only stimulate and engage you in ideas and actions, you will have the opportunity to explore social enterprise Melbourne, network, and converse with people from all over the world who are seeking to bring about change.

12 – 14 December

9 workshops; 17 panel sessions; 1 debate and 1 real-live (Social) Dragon’s Den. 5 keynote sessions. 70+ speakers from Cambodia, India, United States, Bhutan, Vietnam, Africa, Palestine, Israel, the UK and Europe; as well as from all over Australia – from cities and from the outback. From philanthropic not-for-profits to big businesses making big changes… this is the Social Enterprise ecosystem in all its diversity and complexity.

If you’ve ever wondered if it’s possible to make a difference…

If you want to find out more about how social enterprises function and what models really work…

If you want to be inspired; learn; debate; discuss; argue; and be amazed…

Then this is the conference for you: 3 days in Melbourne, 12-14 December…might just change your life.

>> www.rmit.edu.au/globalshifts


Sustainable Gardening in Moreland: Free resources & workshops

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on November 5th, 2012

10 November , 2012
10:30 amto12:30 pm

In collaboration with Sustainable Gardening Australia (SGA), Moreland City Council have released a series of booklets on sustainable gardening that can be downloaded for free from their website.  As part of the release of the booklets, the council is offering gardening workshops from October through to January.  Places are limited so book early – the next workshop is a container-gardening session at Peppertree Place in Coburg on November 10.

>> www.moreland.vic.gov.au/environment-and-waste/sustainable-gardening.html

Training for Transition: Outer Eastern Suburbs

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on October 24th, 2012

27 October , 2012
28 October , 2012


Beginners’ Bike Maintenance Workshop

Posted in Events by EcoCentre on October 24th, 2012

27 October , 2012
2:00 pmto4:00 pm

Sat 27 October, 2pm
St Kilda Foreshore Bikepath, on the foreshore outside of SeaBaths

Get your pushie in gear and become more confident tinkering with your  clean, green machine.  This workshop will equip you with the basics to keep your bike in good repair.

Learn how to ”fix it yourself”.

Content will cover:

  • getting the right seat height
  • fixing punctures and fitting tubes
  • bike chain maintenance
  • fine tuning gears

$10 person. Bookings and pre-payment essential.

Enquiries and bookings: 9534 0670 / paula@ecocentre.com
Venue: St Kilda Foreshore bikepath, outside Seabaths


Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037

Posted in Research, Visions by Jessica Bird on October 23rd, 2012


Image by D. Armellin

A local resilience-building project about climate extremes.

Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 is part of a larger research project Transforming Institutions for Climate Extremes. This project is led by Che Biggs at the Victorian Eco-Innovation Lab (VEIL) at the University of Melbourne. It aims to understand how communities and institutions can prepare and become more resilient to disruptive climate conditions. Anglesea was chosen as an ideal case-study site because it faces multiple climate hazards such as fire, drought and sea level rise but it also has a creative community and a strong local identity.

What is the Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 blog about?

The images and articles you see on the Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 blog are glimpses of possible futures. They depict strategies and ideas about how Anglesea could become more resilient to the more extreme possible impacts of climate change. The ideas represented have been developed from a workshop involving Anglesea community members. In the workshop people were asked to propose adaptation strategies in response to a series of challenging future scenarios that describe Anglesea in the year 2037. These scenarios were built from an assessment of climate model projections, historical records from along the Great Ocean Road and interviews with Anglesea residents. The small number of glimpses you see were combined and synthesised from more than 100 ideas developed in the workshop. Treat them as a window into a range of possible futures that might exist. We encourage you to comment on what is good or not good about the way they respond to challenges from climate change.

Why this project? When managing disaster risk, government and private sector organisations often rely heavily on ‘probability’ or ‘expert’ assessments of the likely type, extent and frequency of negative impacts. This can come unstuck when disasters occur outside what has been predicted and planned for. Transforming Institutions for Climate Extremes is a response to this problem. It responds to the call for new methods to improve community resilience and help communities improve disaster planning. It seeks to explore how prepared our communities, our decision-makers and decision-making processes are for the challenges of ‘new’ climate conditions. It will consider what institutional changes are needed to meet those challenges whilst ensuring community ownership.

Climate change in Anglesea? Anglesea lies in an area of southern Australia that will be affected by climate change in many ways. Climate models project that the most likely direct impacts will include changes to rainfall (drier but with more intense rainfall events), changes in temperature (warmer with more heatwaves), increasing acidity of oceans and rising sea levels. In-turn, these impacts are expected to affect a whole range of factors including increases in coastal erosion and days of extreme fire danger to increased risk of heat-stroke and changes to when plants flower and birds migrate. Climate Change is the effect of heat from the sun being trapped in the Earth’s atmosphere by gases produced by human activity. While some of these gases (like carbon dioxide) are found naturally in the atmosphere, as we increase their concentration above natural levels, they trap more heat from the sun – a bit like an insulation blanket.

You can view the glimpses of a resilient Anglesea in 2037 and comment at www.anglesea2037.com. You can also like the Facebook page to be kept up to date with the project.


‘Buy Nothing New’ Giftmaking Workshop

Posted in Events, Movements by EcoCentre on October 16th, 2012

20 October , 2012
2:00 pmto4:30 pm

Buy Nothing New this Christmas – and get thanked for it!!

There couldn’t be a better time to start gift-making than ‘Buy Nothing New Month’ (October) – a movement for conscientious consumption that highlights super alternatives to consuming more new stuff.

So, revive the true holiday spirit this year with a creative homemade gift, while cutting your costs.

This workshop will guide you through making several free, splendid gifts. Mix teas from dried herbs; create one-of-a-kind botanical cards from native pressed plants; create a puppet for the kids or a door snake out of recycled materials.

FREE workshop. Materials provided.

Saturday 20 October, 2pm-4.30pm
Port Phillip EcoCentre, St Kilda

Enquiries and bookings: 9534 0670 / paula@ecocentre.com
Venue: Port Phillip EcoCentre
Cnr Blessington & Herbert Streets, St Kilda
(adjacent St Kilda Botanic Gardens)