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Posts Tagged ‘waterways’

Melbourne Water Draft Strategies: Consultation now open

Posted in Policies, Seeking by Kate Archdeacon on May 4th, 2012

Melbourne Water is preparing two draft strategies: The Healthy Waterways Strategy and The Stormwater Strategy to guide our actions and management of our waterways and stormwater in the period 2013/14 to 2017/18.

The Healthy Waterways Strategy will replace the current Regional River Health Strategy when it expires in 2013. It will guide investment and actions for healthy rivers, estuaries and wetlands from July 2013 to June 2018. Activities that will be guided by this strategy include vegetation management, environmental flows, habitat enhancement and working with communities to achieve healthy waterways.

The Stormwater Strategy is closely linked to the Healthy Waterways Strategy. It will focus on the management of stormwater in rural and urban areas to protect and improve ecosystem health of waterways and bays over the same period. It will see Melbourne Water working with others to achieve multiple community outcomes for stormwater management in relation to liveability, alternative water supply and public health.

We are really keen for your input into finalising these strategies, and will be consulting on both at the same time during May and June 2012.

Online:

You can join in and comment via an online forum, survey and email on the consultation site.
This will be activated in Mid May 2012.

In person:

You can attend one of eight workshops held in May and June throughout the Port Phillip and Westernport region to learn more and provide comment.
To register, please go to the consultation site. Registration closes one week prior.

http://consultation.melbournewater.com.au/

Hopefully the Stormwater Strategy will link up with the recommendations in the Living Melbourne, Living Victoria Roadmap released last week. KA


10,000 Raingardens Program: Add yours to the list

Posted in Movements, Research by Kate Archdeacon on September 20th, 2011

Melbourne Water’s 10,000 Raingardens Program promotes a new, responsible way of gardening so everybody can create their own water sensitive garden and do their bit to help the environment and protect our rivers and creeks.

The aim of the program is to show you how easy it is to create a water efficient garden in your own backyard. By building a raingarden you will enjoy the benefits of a self watering, low maintenance garden while also contributing to healthier waterways by reducing the amount of pollutants that would otherwise wash into our rivers and creeks. Until now we have been working with local councils and the community to create raingardens in public spaces such as streets, parks and schools. The program has recently expanded and we are now providing easy, step by step instructions so people can design, build and maintain raingardens in their own homes. Our target is to see 10,000 raingardens built across Melbourne by 2013. To achieve this we need your help.

>>Find out what a raingarden is, why you should build a raingarden and how to build one.  (And then add yours to the Map!)

http://raingardens.melbournewater.com.au/


Saltwatch Week: May 8-14

Posted in Events, Movements, Research by Kate Archdeacon on April 28th, 2011

8 May , 2011to14 May , 2011

Source: Sustainability News, Darebin City Council

Saltwatch is an environmental monitoring program that helps communities understand the salinity problem in our waterways. Saltwatch week this year is from Sunday 8th May – Saturday 14th May 2011.

Saltwatch began in 1987, and is Australia’s longest running community monitoring program. During Saltwatch Week (the second week of May), schools and community groups from all over Victoria can learn about the effects of salinity on water quality in their local catchment by collecting local water sources and testing with a salinity meter to determine salt content. Snapshot monitoring provides a terrific opportunity to assess the condition of our waterways at a particular point in time. The collaborative efforts of many registered groups creating a picture of salinity across the state can show changes in salinity ’hot spots’ over time, illustrate the effects of climatic changes such as the current drought, and may even pick up long term trends.

Go to the Saltwatch website to find out more.