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Posts Tagged ‘water-sensitive urban design’

Vision of a Water-Sensitive City: Video

Posted in Research, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on December 19th, 2012

Water Sensitive City_CRC

The Water-Sensitive Cities Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) has launched its new website, complete with research papers and videos.  It’s all worth a look, but the video on the front page, inviting viewers to “Fly through a Water-Sensitive City” is particularly inspiring.  Stay with it past the first minute, which is about the CRC, and you get to the design elements that are really interesting – and the last fifteen seconds are fantastic.  It’s not clear who produced the video, but they should be proud!

>> Watch the video here or go and explore the CRC Water Sensitive Cities website.

 


Water Sensitive Cities Tour 2012: Project snapshots

Posted in Research by Kate Archdeacon on June 21st, 2012


Photo of the Isar River in Munich by Marcio Cabral de Moura via flickr CC

From “Water Sensitive Cities 2012 Study Tour Group return home“:

The Water Sensitive Cities 2012 Study Tour group, comprising of 18 young water professionals from across Australia, have now completed the overseas leg of their trip. The group travelled to Singapore, the UK, Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands to develop their knowledge of integrated water management and to draw out relevant learnings that can aid Australia in moving towards a Water Sensitive City.

Tour participant Nicole Sexton, Senior Planner Strategy and Sustainability from Barwon Water, produced a poster presentation for the Healthy Cities Conference in Geelong on 6-8 June. The poster provides a snapshot of the sites that the group visited.

Click here to view the poster.


Streetscape Raingarden Design Principles: Guide

Posted in Models, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on May 28th, 2012


From the reference guide.
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Sourced from Clearwater :

This A3 Quick Reference Guide will introduce the reader to the basics of streetscape raingarden design. The guide indentifies the critical elements for a good design as well as some tips for what to watch out for. Links are provided for more technical guidance and to video clips on how to build a raingarden.

http://www.clearwater.asn.au/content/streetscape-raingarden-design-principles


What is a Water-Sensitive City? Workshop

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on May 24th, 2012

5 June , 2012
4:00 pmto6:00 pm


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Clearwater, in partnership with Warrnambool City Council and Horizon 21, will be delivering a free workshop to learn about the benefits of applying Water Sensitive Urban Design, a range of sustainable water management techniques, and relevant policy and legislation.

Tuesday June 5th, 4-6pm

This workshop is appropriate for those who plan and manage the urban built environment (streetscape, carpark and parkland elements) and are looking for ways to utilise stormwater and improve the quality of run off stormwater and create a water sensitive City.  This session is ideal for planners, engineers, drafts people, architects, horticulturalists, builders and site supervisors. At the end of this session you will:

  • become familiar with the concepts required to design an effective stormwater harvesting project
  • learn about the latest research in stormwater pollutants
  • gain an understanding of how to plan for and apply stormwater technologies
  • learn about an innovative water harvesting project underway in the South West.
RSVP by Friday 1 June 2012 via the Clearwater website.


Melbourne Water Draft Strategies: Consultation now open

Posted in Policies, Seeking by Kate Archdeacon on May 4th, 2012

Melbourne Water is preparing two draft strategies: The Healthy Waterways Strategy and The Stormwater Strategy to guide our actions and management of our waterways and stormwater in the period 2013/14 to 2017/18.

The Healthy Waterways Strategy will replace the current Regional River Health Strategy when it expires in 2013. It will guide investment and actions for healthy rivers, estuaries and wetlands from July 2013 to June 2018. Activities that will be guided by this strategy include vegetation management, environmental flows, habitat enhancement and working with communities to achieve healthy waterways.

The Stormwater Strategy is closely linked to the Healthy Waterways Strategy. It will focus on the management of stormwater in rural and urban areas to protect and improve ecosystem health of waterways and bays over the same period. It will see Melbourne Water working with others to achieve multiple community outcomes for stormwater management in relation to liveability, alternative water supply and public health.

We are really keen for your input into finalising these strategies, and will be consulting on both at the same time during May and June 2012.

Online:

You can join in and comment via an online forum, survey and email on the consultation site.
This will be activated in Mid May 2012.

In person:

You can attend one of eight workshops held in May and June throughout the Port Phillip and Westernport region to learn more and provide comment.
To register, please go to the consultation site. Registration closes one week prior.

http://consultation.melbournewater.com.au/

Hopefully the Stormwater Strategy will link up with the recommendations in the Living Melbourne, Living Victoria Roadmap released last week. KA


A smart and resilient water system for a liveable, sustainable and productive Melbourne

Posted in Policies, Research, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on April 26th, 2012


Image from the Implementation Plan summary

The Living Melbourne, Living Victoria Roadmap was released in March 2011. It outlined the recommended priorities for reform to support achievement of the Government’s objectives for urban water. The newly released Living Melbourne Living Victoria Implementation Plan outlines the [Ministerial Advisory Council] MAC’s final recommendations for changes needed to the urban water system to achieve a more sustainable, liveable Melbourne and Victoria.

From “Sense breaks through water debate” by Carolyn Boyd:

[A] new report in Victoria finds this: “the current system does not adequately support the use of alternative water sources (e.g. rainwater and storm water) for non-drinking needs”.

[…]

Among a raft of other suggestions, the findings push for stronger building controls to catch stormwater at its source and store it – in some cases in rainwater tanks at properties, and in others in storage tanks big enough for a whole urban precinct. When we have situations where more storm water flows out of a city each year than the city consumes (as is the case in Melbourne), it does seem crazy not to be tapping into the stuff as it falls from the sky.

The strategy aims to reduce the demand for mains water by using stormwater for non-drinking functions such as flushing toilets and washing clothes, and continues to support greater water efficiency in homes through low-use appliances and tap fittings.

The report suggests improved standards should apply to all new and significantly renovated buildings in Victoria. The report models the outcomes of capturing more storm water and provides some interesting insights. One of the scenarios uses a combination of enhanced household water efficiency and rainwater tanks to provide water for toilets, laundry and gardens. In this scenario, mains water was assumed to be used for personal washing and in the kitchen.

The modelling estimated these changes would cut potable water demand by 24 per cent, and lead to a 9 per cent drop in stormwater runoff and an 11 per cent fall in the amount of wastewater being discharged across greater Melbourne by 2050.

In another scenario, domestic rainwater was used for hot water and laundry, while storm water was collected and stored at a precinct or suburb-level, and supplied to households for toilet flushing and gardens. The modelling shows the above would deliver a 38 per cent cut in mains water demand, an 11 per cent drop ?in stormwater runoff and a 32 per cent fall in the wastewater being discharged across greater Melbourne by 2050.

Putting the argument for better water collection in residences, the report noted that larger infrastructure, such as dams and desal plants had a “lumpy, long lead time” and run “much higher risks of saddling customers and/or taxpayers with excessive or unneeded investment” – as many residents across Australia are arguing they are now finding with various desalination plants.

Read the full article by Carolyn Boyd, or read more about Living Melbourne, Living Victoria.


Melbourne Growth Area: WSUD Tour

Posted in Events by Clearwater on March 28th, 2012

20 April , 2012
9:00 amto2:00 pm

Clearwater offers a number of capacity building initiatives that can help broaden your skills and knowledge in sustainable urban water management.

Tour Overview
Clearwater is proud to announce a new half day Growth Area WSUD tour in Hume City Council and the City of Whittlesea. The tour will include site visits to biofilters and wetlands in new housing estates, visits to council owned WSUD assets and town centre renewal projects incorporating WSUD and stormwater harvesting.  This tour will focus on the opportunities and challenges for growth area councils to implement WSUD in greenfield estates and urban renewal projects. Presenters will discuss issues of engineering, urban design, landscaping, organisational/ community engagement and working with developers.

Audience
Suitable for anyone interested in applying water sensitive urban design in growth areas or new housing estates. This will include commercial developers, planners and designers, engineers, landscape architects, environment and asset maintenance staff and contractors.

Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
Course completion will contribute CPD points to programs with the following organisations: Nursery and Garden Industry Association (NGIA), Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA), Engineers Australia, Planning Institute of Australia (PIA).

Register now at the Clearwater website

Date: Friday 20 April, 9am – 2pm

RSVP
Friday 13 April


Stonnington and Port Phillip: WSUD Tour

Posted in Events by Clearwater on February 28th, 2012

23 March , 2012
9:00 amto2:00 pm

Clearwater offers a number of capacity building initiatives that can help broaden your skills and knowledge in sustainable urban water management.

Tour Overview
The tour highlights an array of WSUD stormwater treatment measures and harvesting systems across the City of Stonnington and Port Phillip. Council experts and design consultants will be onsite to provide insights into the development and management of each project, discussing challenges, learnings and outcomes from concept to completion.  This tour will visit tree pits, raingardens in both commercial and residential areas, stormwater harvest systems designed for open space irrigation and vehicle washdown sites.  You will gain an insight into project goals, costs, engineering, landscaping and maintenance considerations and community engagement.

Audience
Suitable for anyone involved in sustainable water planning or asset maintenance / design, including developers, planners, architects, environment and maintenance staff.

Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
Course completion will contribute CPD points to programs with the following organisations: Nursery and Garden Industry Association (NGIA), Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA), Engineers Australia, Planning Institute of Australia (PIA).

Date: 23rd March 2012, 9am – 2pm

RSVP
Friday 16 March

Register now at the Clearwater website


WSUD 2012 Conference: Associated workshop & tour

Posted in Events by Clearwater on February 6th, 2012

24 January , 2012
20 February , 2012

Clearwater offers a number of capacity building initiatives that can help broaden your skills and knowledge in sustainable urban water management.

There are currently two unique development opportunities being delivered in conjunction with the 7th International Conference on Water Sensitive Urban Design.

Gaining Institutional Capacity for WSUD will provide council staff with the skills to assess organisational capacity, build commitment into planning and policy, and engage stakeholders to adopt new initiatives.  This one day workshop will be held on Monday 20th February – click here for more information.

2012 WSUD Technical Site Tour will highlight how innovative WSUD stormwater treatment measures and harvesting systems contribute to a water sensitive city vision.  The tour will visit new and established WSUD sites at a range of scales across Melbourne.  This one day tour will be held on Friday 24 February – click here for more information.