Posts Tagged ‘sustainable food’

Picnic for the Planet on Earth Day

Posted in Events by John Myers on April 12th, 2012

22 April , 2012
12:00 pmto2:00 pm
Take part in Picnic for the Planet on Sunday 22 April, Earth Day, with The Nature Conservancy at Prahran Market’s Market Square in South Yarra, Melbourne.

This very special event is part of a global, potentially record-breaking effort designed to celebrate the planet and the sustainable food it provides.  Dr James Fitzsimons, Director of Conservation at The Nature Conservancy, said, “The main point of Picnic for the Planet is simple: to give people a fun and easy way to enjoy Earth Day through the food they enjoy and with the people they love.”

This year marks the second annual Picnic for the Planet and the first such event in Melbourne.  “We are thrilled to be supported by Prahran Market, the oldest continuously running market in Australia,” Dr Fitzsimons said. “It’s known as ‘the food lovers’ market’ because of the quality and range of its vendors. It’s a perfect, open-air place for people to celebrate the planet and think about where their food comes from.”

Participants in the Prahran Market event will also have a shot at the record books. The Melbourne picnic is one of hundreds of The Nature Conservancy’s Picnics for the Planet happening worldwide that, collectively, will attempt to set the Guinness World Record™ for the most people picnicking in a 24-hour period.  The picnic will feature live music from local talent, cooking demonstrations and other family-friendly activities, as well as the chance to pick up a host of picnic goodies from the stallholders at Prahran Market.

The event is free and open to the public, rain or shine from 12 noon to 2pm.

Those unable to make the main Picnic for the Planet can sign up to host their own picnic with family and friends. Anyone who holds a Picnic for the Planet with at least 25 people can download materials that will allow their picnic to be officially included in the Guinness World Record™-breaking attempt.

The Nature Conservancy (TNC) is a leading conservation organisation working around the world in more than 30 countries to protect the lands and waters on which all life depends. The Nature Conservancy has worked with Indigenous groups and other partners to protect more than 6 million hectares in Australia since 2000. We helped to secure 29 high priority additions to the National Reserve System, including some of the largest private protected areas in Australia. The Nature Conservancy is now supporting the conservation of nearly 30 million hectares of largely Indigenous lands across northern and central Australia and we’re working to conserve the Great Western Woodlands, the world’s largest intact temperate woodland. Visit The Nature Conservancy at www.nature.org/australia


Growing Change: A journey inside Venezuela’s food revolution

Posted in Events, Uncategorized by EcoCentre on November 22nd, 2011

28 November , 2011
7:00 pmto9:00 pm

Join Port Phillip EcoCentre for this FREE screening of a film “Growing change” that investigates alternatives to the industrial and corporate controlled food system that have been developed by people of Venezuela. After the film have your say in a discussion! What can we learn from their experience? What can we do differently?

The documentary begins with an investigation of the 2008 global food crisis, looking at the long-term underlying causes. Will expanding large-scale, energy-intensive agriculture, be the solution or re problems? If we already produce enough food to feed the world why do so many people go hungry? After hearing about efforts in Venezuela to develop a more equitable and sustainable food and agriculture system, the filmmaker heads there to see if it’s working and find out what we might be able to learn from this giant experiment. It’s an inspirational story full of lively characters, thought provoking insights, stunning scenery and ideas to transform the food system.

Monday, 28 November at 7pm

Port Phillip EcoCentre 55A Blessington St, St Kilda

Any questions?  Write to us: reception@ecocentre.com or call (03) 9534 0670

For more info about the film: www.growingchange.com.au


The Economics of Happiness: Foodie film screening

Posted in Events by TransitionTownPortPhillip on November 10th, 2011

14 November , 2011
8:00 pmto9:30 pm

“Going local” is a powerful strategy to repair our fractured world – our ecosystems, our societies and ourselves… Join us on Monday 14 November, 7.30 for 8pm screening of “The Economics of Happiness”, a film exploring the emerging paradigm of re-localisation, a new way of thinking about economics, growth & prosperity.

Special guest speaker, Nick Ray, founder of the Ethical Consumer Guide.

Tickets $11 online  or $12 on the door (subject to availability) includes nibblies made from locally sourced produce & a glass of wine.
SLOWdown Cafe Bar Restaurant, 56 Acland St, St Kilda (opposite McDonalds).

Appetite for Insight foodie films are proudly presented in partnership with SLOWdown eco-friendly restaurant & Transition Town Port Phillip, supported by Port Phillip Urban Fresh Food Network & Veg Out Community Gardens.


“The End Of The Line” foodie film screening

Posted in Events by TransitionTownPortPhillip on October 6th, 2011

10 October , 2011
7:30 pmto9:00 pm

Imagine a world without fish, Imagine your meals without seafood…

Join us on Monday 10 October, 7.30 for 8pm screening of “The End Of The Line”, a film exploring the alarming consequences of global overfishing.  Guest speaker John Ford, Marine Scientist & Presenter on Triple R’s “Radio Marinara” will share his knowledge about local impacts and sustainable seafood.  Tickets $15 online http://slowdown.net.au/news.html or on the door (subject to availability) includes nibblies made from locally sourced produce & a glass of wine.

SLOWdown Cafe Bar Restaurant, 56 Acland St, St Kilda (opposite McDonalds), 8534 3030

Sustainable seafood pre-screening menu available.

Appetite for Insight foodie films are proudly presented in partnership with SLOWdown eco-friendly restaurant & Transition Town Port Phillip, supported by Port Phillip Urban Fresh Food Network & Veg Out Community Gardens.


“Anima Mundi”: Film screening

Posted in Events by TransitionTownPortPhillip on August 19th, 2011

12 September , 2011
8:00 pmto10:00 pm

Will you survive the transition of human industrial civilization happening now due to peak oil and climate change? Can you see the forest for the trees, the earth for the dream, the universe for the seed?

Join us Monday 12 September @ 7.30pm for 8pm screening of “ANIMA MUNDI”,  a new & innovative Aussie documentary about Permaculture, Peak Oil, Climate Change & the Soul of the World. with guest speakers, Filmmaker Peter Charles Downey & Integrative Medicine expert, Dr Mark O’Meadhra

SLOWdown restaurant cafe bar, 56 Acland Street, St Kilda (opp McDonalds)

Tickets $10 online or $11 on the door (subject to availability). Includes locally sourced produce nibblies & glass of wine. Sustainable pre-screening menu  available beforehand.

Proudly presented in partnership with SLOWdown eco-friendly cafe bar & Transition Town Port Phillip, supported by Port Phillip Urban Fresh Food Network & Veg Out Community Gardens.


“One Man, One Cow, One Planet”: Film Night

Posted in Events by TransitionTownPortPhillip on June 9th, 2011

13 June , 2011
7:30 pmto9:30 pm

A simple recipe to save the world? One old man and a bucket of cow-dung!

Modern agriculture causes topsoil to be eroded at 3 million tons per hour (that’s 26 billion tons a year). Human mass is replacing biomass and other species. The carrying capacity of the earth is almost spent. To maintain our comfort zone lifestyles we will soon need five earths to sustain us in the style to which we have become accustomed. The mantra of free trade has failed the world’s poor. There is a better way. Biodynamic agriculture may be the only answer we have left.

Join us Monday 13 June, 7.30pm for 8pm (sharp) screening of “ONE MAN, ONE COW, ONE PLANET”

SlowDown!@Harley Court, 56 Acland Street, St Kilda (opp McDonalds)

Tickets $11 on the door (subject to availability). Includes locally sourced produce nibblies & glass of wine. Arrive earlier for vegan pre-screening menu from 5-7pm

Proudly presented in partnership with SlowDown@ Harley Court, Transition Town Port Phillip and Port Phillip Urban Fresh Food Network, supported by Veg Out Community Gardens & Slow Food Melbourne.



“Kitchen Symphony” a community cooking event

Posted in Events by TransitionTownPortPhillip on May 18th, 2011

21 May , 2011
11:00 amto3:00 pm

Join Port Phillip Urban Fresh Food Network & Transition Town Port Phillip for “Kitchen Symphony”, and take part in the cook up of the season!

We’ll be preparing and sharing a fresh and seasonal, low cost, vegetarian banquet. Other activities include a food swap, garden foraging, composting & food mapping. Bring your surplus homegrown veg, herbs, seeds etc. All cooking abilities welcome!

Sat 21 May, 11-3pm @ the Cora Graves Centre

38 Blessington St, St Kilda

Please RSVP: 0417 501 383 / gardeners@ecocentre.com


Collingwood Children’s Farm – Bringing the Country to the City

Posted in Models, RDAG by Virginia on May 5th, 2009

The Collingwood Children’s Farm is a not-for-profit community resource providing country experiences for city people. It was established in 1979 when a community committee, with support from the former Collingwood City Council, leased a small area of the convent for a Children’s Farm.

Collingwood Children's FarmCollingwood Children's FarmCollingwood Children's Farm

The Committee hoped children living in an urban environment, often without backyards, could learn to care for animals and nature and also have fun outdoors. Local schools and other groups helped with fencing, gardening and animal care. Members of the Greek Elderly Citizens and the Turkish Welfare Group helped clear weeds and carve out the community plots.

Since the 1980s, state and local governments have funded some of the Farm’s costs. State and Federal Labour governments supported the successful bid for a much larger area of land. Now the Collingwood Children’s Farm Committee of Management manages this Crown land site. Service clubs and philanthropic trusts help, but always the largest part of our operational costs comes from entry fees, donations and through the work of volunteers.

This is from “Social Innovations in Victorian Food Systems”, case studies by Ferne Edwards.


Sharing Backyards – Share to grow

Posted in Models, RDAG by Virginia on April 24th, 2009

People have begun to share their backyards in order to produce more homegrown foods. In North America and Canada this activity has been extended by using online technologies linking people with unused yard space to grow food.

Access to land is believed to be one of the biggest barriers to food production as stated by Patrick Hayes from MapsWest. Land must be local for the gardeners while trust is also important enhanced through proximity. The ‘Sharing Backyards’ concept aims to make maximum use of the city by identifying wasted space suitable for food production.

Sharing backyard sites apply geocoding and web mapping technologies to reveal potential garden plots. Sharing backyard sites include www.sharingbackyards.com, www.cityfarmer.org/sharing_backyards, www.lifecyclesproject.ca/initiatives/sharing_backyards.

This is from “Social Innovations in Victorian Food Systems,’ case studies by Ferne Edwards


The Australian Conservation Foundation Consumption Atlas

Posted in Models, RDAG by Virginia on April 21st, 2009

The Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF) is one of Australia’s oldest environmental agencies committed to inspiring Australians to achieve a healthy environment over the last forty years.

ACF developed the online Consumption Atlas website in 2007 to complement the research paper, ‘Consuming Australia’, conducted in partnership with the University of Sydney. This report described and analysed the main environmental impacts of consumption in Australia. Food is a key area that emerged from this study, considering the household consumption of interrelated factors such as water, land and energy use.

The online Consumption Atlas encourages individuals to personalise their consumption by locating where they live on the map and choosing an indicator (greenhouse gas emissions, water use or eco-footprint) to discover their local consumption rate showing them how they compare nationally. Methods are offered to help people reduce their overall consumption.

Most importantly, this site untangles complex interdependencies of material flows to help people understand the true implications of their personal consumption.

For more information about the Australian Conservation Foundation’s Consumption Atlas visit www.acfonline.org.au/ Consumptionatlas.

This is from “Social Innocation in Victorian Food Systems’ case studies by Ferne Edwards