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Posts Tagged ‘sustainable food systems’

EcoCity Food Forum: Melbourne

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on March 7th, 2013

22 March , 2013
9:00 amto5:00 pm

ecocity forum

EcoCity Food Forum Melbourne

Doing Something Good

Friday, March 22, 2013 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (EST)

Healthy food systems are the foundation for healthy lives, communities, economies and ecosystems. In order to build a future for Melbourne in which we can all thrive, we need a food system that is sustainable, resilient and equitable.

Doing Something Good in partnership with City of Melbourne, are hosting a one day forum for those working toward a better food system. We’re bringing together people and organisations from across the food industry, with health and environmental advocates, government representatives and community members to:

  • discover socially innovative and sustainable initiatives transforming food systems in Melbourne, across Australia and around the world
  • envision what a sustainable, resilient and equitable food system for Melbourne might look like
  • discuss what we can all do to create opportunities, enable success and accelerate change
  • learn how we can better cooperate, collaborate and coordinate our efforts
  • make plans for individual and collective action

The EcoCity Food Forum is perfectly timed to take place immediately after the National Sustainable Food Summit in Melbourne, and will give participants the chance to continue building valuable connections, knowledge, capability and opportunities.  Based on the design of successful ‘Unconferences’, Gathering ‘11 and CoMConnect (also with the City of Melbourne), The EcoCity Food Forum will be a full day of participant led conversations, presentations, workshops and planning sessions with passionate change makers and thought leaders from all over the city, around the state and across the country.

Find out more and register at http://www.eventbrite.com/event/5405865088

Friday, March 22, 2013 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (EST)


Locavored Series: The Foodpreneurs

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on March 6th, 2013

13 March , 2013
6:00 pmto8:00 pm

TFP-A-1.04

Innovative business minds reshaping the food scene

Opinionated, risk-taking, sassy and wise, our speakers will share how they’ve succeeded while all around them food sector start-ups struggle to survive. The food industry is as much about ideas as it is ingredients. Who are the foodpreneurs revolutionising the future of local food system?

Get to know some of the smart people and innovative approaches reshaping the future of food and farming. Look at how collaboration, branding, design and social media are cracking open new markets and winning the hearts and minds of the populace as we hear from an avocado grower, a rice paper roll queen, the president of a regional food group, a food box entrepreneur, a social media guru and the man who saved an abattoir.

The Fed Square Locavored Series curated by The Locavore Edition and held at The Edge at Federation Square gets to the heart of the matter, identifying the rising stars driving the future of food, farming and culinary culture. This is an unmissable Melbourne Food and Wine Festival event with great speakers, important stories and local spirit. And don’t forget, you can choose a ticket which includes a copy of The Field Guide to Victorian Produce, our handy guidebook which helps locavores find growers, producers and providers. Join us as we reconnect consumers and producers!

6pm, Wednesday March 13
The Edge, Federation Square
cnr Swanston and Flinders Streets,
VIC, Australia.
Tickets available online at I Wanna Ticket – locavore.iwannaticket.com.au

Please note you must pre-book tickets. You cannot purchase tickets at the door. Entry $25 OR Entry including The Field Guide to Victorian Produce $40

10% of ticket sales will go towards Sustainable Table’s funded projects.


Food City: City of Melbourne Food Policy available online

Posted in Policies by Kate Archdeacon on November 14th, 2012


Photo from the City of Melbourne Food Policy

Over the past year, the City of Melbourne has been developing its Food Policy, with requests for public input at two different stages during that time – first, as responses to the discussion paper, and second, as responses to the draft policy.  Now the final policy is available online.  The sections of the policy are:

  • Policy statement
  • Introduction
  • Vision
  • Themes and ambitions
    • a strong, food secure community
    • healthy food choices for all
    • a sustainable and resilient food system
    • a thriving local food economy
    • a city that celebrates food
  • Implementation and evaluation
  • References
  • Glossary

The next stage will involve the development of the Implementation Plan – register for updates with the Food Policy team at foodpolicy@melbourne.vic.gov.au.

>> Food Policy website.

True costs of imported food in Australian supermarkets?

Posted in Movements, Opinion, Policies by Kate Archdeacon on June 1st, 2012

Source: Food Magazine


Photo by Tait Schmaal in an article for Adelaide Now about the damage imported processed food is doing to local growers.

From “Where does the food sold in Australian supermarkets really come from?” by Jessica Burke:

One in every four grocery items now sold in Australian supermarkets is private label and of those, about one in two is imported.

The Age has conducted an investigation into the state of the supermarket sector, and the results would not surprise anyone in the Australian food manufacturing sector. It found the rate of imported food products is increasing at a rapid pace, as the only way for the companies to provide their ridiculously low prices is to buy food produced in countries by cheap labour.

South Africa and Thailand, two countries notorious for lacking in workers’ rights and having extremely low wages, are two of the markets commonly used by the cheap food retailers in Australia.  Researchers from the Australian National University embarked on a mission to follow the supply chain of many private-label products sold in Australia, which found them in South African fruit processing factories and canned pineapple facilities in Thailand. “One of the canneries made private-label products for over 100 supermarkets,” researcher Libby Hattersley, who inspected the South African businesses, told The Age. “They just slap the retailers’ label on it and send it out to them.”

Differing food safety laws a risk for consumers

While the ethical issues involved with sourcing food from such countries are becoming increasingly important to consumers, there are various other issues involved with these systems.

“[No Australian food manufacturers] can survive in this environment, most places I’m going, they’re even competing with their own plants in other countries, if the Malaysian or Chinese plant is going better, they have to compete,” Jennifer Dowell, National Secretary of the Food and Confectionary division of the Australian Manufacturers Workers Union (AMWU) told Food Magazine earlier this year.

“The problem with that is that people aren’t comparing like with like.

“We produce food to a very high level and what is being imported from overseas needs to be the same quality.

“There needs to be more regulation and better testing for what comes into our country.

“If food is imported from a high risk site, like China, that will undergo testing, but not if it’s from New Zealand.

“The way the import laws work in New Zealand mean that they can import a product from China, put it in a bag in New Zealand and ship it to Australia as a ‘product of New Zealand.’

“If we try to export to other countries we face huge barriers, but we have removed all the barriers for others getting food into our country.”

[…]

Read the full article by Jessie Burke for Food Magazine.


Models of change – Launching the Meals in Metropolis exhibition at Docklands!

Posted in Events by Ferne Edwards on October 10th, 2008

In 2008 RMIT University introduced an elective called “Meals in Metropolis”. This subject explored the variety and breadth of urban agriculture models in Melbourne, Australia. Students were asked to conduct field research in specific food production and distribution examples and then redesign these systems to incorporate greater social, economic, cultural and environmental sustainability outcomes. The Meals in Metropolis exhibition illustrates a selection of the outcomes of this course and reveals that our food future may not be so bleak after all…
Where: The Hub, 17 Waterview Walk, Docklands (near the corner of Bourke Street and Harbour Esplanade – look for the giant rabbit sculpture) Melway reference: 2E H7
When: 13 October to 21 November 200
To view images of this work online click here.
For more information about this event
contact Ferne Edwards, fedwards@unimelb.edu.au or (03) 89344 9268

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