Posts Tagged ‘sustainable cities’

May the force be with you – Service design for invisible connections

Posted in Events by emma.gerard on August 28th, 2013

29 August , 2013
6:00 pmto8:00 pm
Yodandy

Image from SDNM

From the Service Design Network Melbourne (SDNM) by Yoko Akama

The innocuous seeming arrows and lines in organisational charts and process diagrams often represent time, context, and connections that are essential to the experiences people have with those organisations. The problem is that arrows and connecting lines are so ubiquitous in diagrams that they seem invisible and are often overlooked.

It is much easier–and human nature—to focus effort on “things” because they represent tangible touchpoints, such as a website, ticket machine, and so on. As a result, many forget to attend to designing the experience of the arrows and lines—the transitions from one touchpoint to the next. They are too important to let just happen. Too important they are.

This talk with Dr. Andy Polaine and discussion explores how thinking about and designing the space and time between touchpoints can help bridge the silos within organisations that prevent engaging and positive service experiences from happening.

Dr. Andy Polaine has been involved in interaction design since the early 90s and was co-founder of the award-winning new media group, Antirom, in London. He was a creative producer at Razorfish, UK and later Interactive Director at Animal Logic, Sydney. Andy was Senior Lecturer and Head of the School of Media Arts at The University of New South Wales, Sydney before moving to Germany and holds a PhD from the University of Technology, Sydney in which he examined the relationship between play and interactivity. He now divides his time between being a Lecturer and Researcher in Service Design at the Lucerne School of Art and Design in Switzerland and his work as a service/interaction design consultant and writer, working with clients such as Telenor, VW Germany and live|work. He has written over 160 articles and papers and co-authored the Rosenfeld Media book, Service Design: From Insight to Implementation. He can be found online at polaine.com and on Twitter as @apolaine.

Time: August 29, 2013 from 6pm to 8pm
Location: Multipurpose Room (Level 1), RMIT Design Hub
Street: Victoria Street, corner of Swanston Street
City/Town: Melbourne
Event Type: talk
Organized By: Service Design Melbourne Network read more on their website


Change makers Festival – Australia’s national celebration of social change

Posted in Events by emma.gerard on August 14th, 2013

1 November , 2013 4:00 pmto10 November , 2013 4:00 pm
1 November , 2013 4:00 pmto10 November , 2013 4:00 pm
image from changemakersfestival.org

image from changemakersfestival.org

 

From ‘Be part of it’ buy SIXAUS:
The Changemakers Festival [presented by TACSI] is a celebration of the great work happening in our community, an exploration of the ideas, techniques and technologies that are driving this change, and an invitation for everyone to get involved in creating a better future for their community and our nation. It kicks off in November and works as a ‘distributed festival’, which means that hundreds of Australia’s leading thinkers and organisations will be holding events across every state and territory. There’ll be conferences, meetups, startup weekends, webinars, workshops, and plenty more.

Over the last 10 years, Australia has exploded as a hub of social change. Driven by technology, and inspired by local and international success stories, the social innovation community is starting to tackle some of our toughest social challenges and answer some of our biggest questions. What is the good life? What is Australia’s place in our region and the world? How can we respond to climate change, to refugees, to the changing nature of employment and family? The Changemakers Festival brings these ideas out in the open and encourages strong discussion, cross-sector collaboration, and concrete action to drive social change.

In due course we’ll be sharing the full program with you, but the important question for now is, why not organise and host an event yourself? The Changemakers Festival is a chance to bring people together, to create community, share knowledge, foster collaboration and inspire imagination. If you have an idea for something for your community we’d love to hear it!

To find out more about the festival check out www.changemakersfestival.org and hit the “host an event” button to tell us about your idea.

And if you need to raise some funds to make your idea a reality you’ll be interested in the Changemakers Festival Crowdfunding Challenge on StartSomeGood, which is offering over $5,000 in bonus funds to those running crowdfunding campaigns to fuel Changemakers Festival events. But if you want to take advantage of this opportunity you need to be quick! You’ll need to submit your idea by this Friday and be ready to launch your campaign by August 21 to be part of it. You’ll have help from us and from the StartSomeGood team to make it happen though! (More about the challenge here: http://bit.ly/CMFchallenge)

 

>>>> The Change makers festival kicks off on the 1st – 10th November 2013
>>>> TACSI and SIXAUS who are they?

Florence 2035: A VEIL exhibition

Posted in Events, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on May 21st, 2013

18 May , 2013 10:00 amto9 August , 2013 5:00 pm

Vision Florence 2032 Exhibition Flyer 2013-1
Images by Andrew Wong, Nikaya Lewis, Tom Shield

Vision: Florence 2035 – Eco-Acupuncture: Developing Sites of Urban Intervention is a free exhibition of selected Architecture and Urban Planning projects developed as part of the Victorian Eco Innovation Lab’s Eco-Acupuncture travelling studio in Florence 2012. The projects envision a sustainable and resilient future for Florence.

18 May – 09 August

Museo Italiano, 199 Faraday Street, Carlton

Open Tuesday-Friday 10am-5pm
Saturday 12noon-5pm

>> Download the exhibition flyer


Making Cities: A Synopsis of the Melbourne Roundtable Event

Posted in Models by missleeder on April 19th, 2013

Degraves II_¡kuba!_BY_NC_SA
Photo by ¡kuba! via flickr CC

The IFPH (International Foundation for Housing and Planning) are celebrating their centenary this year, with a series of worldwide events to discuss important urban design matters from local to global scale. They are focusing on the seven foundations they see to be crucial to creating more sustainable cities: ‘Making Cities: Smarter, Grow Green, Climate Resilient, Healthier, Globally Connected, Socially Cohesive and Safe and Secure.’

Melbourne was the location for the ‘Making Cities: Safer?‘ Roundtable event, moderated by Dr.Soren Smidt-Jensen of the Danish Architecture Centre, with panellists Jan Gehl (Gehl Architects,Denmark), Rob Adams (Director of City Design, City of Melbourne Council), Hugh Nicholson (Principal Urban Designer at Christchurch City Council, New Zealand) and Khoo Teng Chye (Centre for Liveable Cities (CLC), Singapore). An easy camaraderie, ensuing, no doubt from their numerous walking tours around the city in the previous days, added to the enjoyment of the evening.

Some key themes were addressed; the importance of both Government and Community approaches, the Docklands, small versus big developers, strategic retreats and most pertinently for its location, the implications, problems and ideas for Melbourne’s predicted growth.

This intriguing latter topic was expansive with ideas; one being the threat that a lack of social cohesion can have during growth, leading to a disparate city of the ‘haves and have-nots,’ according to Rob, who suggested mixed use, public realm, good connectivity and local character instead. Another threat, to both the aforementioned mixed use and public realm qualities, as well as active street frontages, was raised; that being the demise of the high street shop, in part due to supermarkets, the internet and out of town malls. Jan suggested new opportunities could arise from this, such as spaces for smaller scale businesses, voluntary organisations and creative outlets, whilst acknowledging that these would involve a new type of tenancy, and to a certain degree, economy. The work of Renew was mentioned as showing viable alternatives and opportunities to combat this issue, whilst Rob implored a move away from our current throw-away culture, to better, longer lasting products.

Read the rest of this entry »


Transitions Film Festival 2013

Posted in Events, Movements by Jessica Bird on February 14th, 2013

15 February , 2013 10:00 amto23 February , 2013 10:00 pm

Transitions-poster

TRANSITIONS FILM FESTIVAL, 15 to 23 February 2013
“See the change you want to be in the world”

Featuring an amazing line-up of films including Matt Damon and Gus Van Sant’s feature narrative Promised Land, The Sundance Institute’s A Fierce Green Fire and the highly anticipated Chasing Ice, the Transitions Film Festival runs from February 15-23rd at Federation Square, ACMI and Cinema Nova. The program also features introductions and panel discussions with international filmmakers and Australia’s sustainability leaders. Key guests include Bob Brown (former leader of The Australian Greens), Drew Hutton (Lock The Gate), John Wiseman (Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute), Anna Rose (AYCC) and Velcrow Ripper via satellite (Director of Occupy Love).

Transitions Film Festival is dedicated to showcasing powerful, inspiring and ground-breaking films from around the world that highlight the awe-inspiring global transformations that are taking place every day. Covering topics such as social entrepreneurship, energy politics, climate change, social justice and technological innovation, the festival hopes to inspire the transition to a sustainable world. To encourage low emissions transport, audience members riding bikes to Cinema Nova screenings will receive cyclist’s concession prices.

Important Dates:
Federation Square Free Screenings: 15-16 February 2013
Cinema Nova Program: 17 -23 February 2013
ACMI Shorts: 18 February 2013

>>> For more information and to view the program visit the Transitions Film Festival website.


Planning for Low Carbon Development

Posted in Events by Jessica Bird on January 30th, 2013

6 February , 2013
6:30 pmto8:00 pm

"Minegolia"
Photo by Al Jazeera English via Flickr CC.

The twin challenge of poverty eradication and emissions reductions.

In developing countries, where most of the world’s population lives, the daunting challenge for governments and policy makers is to reduce both poverty and greenhouse gas emissions. Professor Harald Winkler from the University of Cape Town’s Energy Research Centre will offer his perspective on how this challenge might be tackled in South Africa, a country that, like Australia, has a heavy dependence on coal-based electricity generation. Prof Winkler argues that taking more ambitious action to reduce emissions can result in socio-economic advantages, or ‘co-benefits’, which should be considered primary rather than secondary benefits.

Professor Winkler will be joined by panellists, Tony Wood and Malte Meinshausen, to discuss the Australian parallels to South Africa’s experience.

Date: Wednesday 6th February, 2013, 6.30pm – 8.00pm.

Venue: Carrillo Ganter Theatre, Sidney Myer Asia Centre,
Corner Swanston Street and Monash Road,
The University of Melbourne.

Hosted by the Grattan Institute.


Learning from European Cities

Posted in Models, Opinion by Kate Archdeacon on July 12th, 2012

 Source: The Fifth Estate


Photo by Jason Pier in DC via flickr CC

From “Sexy … as in small: the European angle on cities” by Robin Mellon, Green Building Council Australia (GBCA):

[…]

In Australia, we have borrowed much from Europe in the evolution of our cities, not least some of the names. But the majority of Australia’s urban development has occurred during the era of the motor car, and so our towns and cities are much less dense and much more sprawled. And with that broad expanse of country on which to build have come larger and larger homes.

On a worldwide scale, Australia already has five of the 20 least affordable cities, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit’s 2012 Worldwide Cost of Living survey. Energy prices are rising fast, mostly due to under-investment in infrastructure over the past 25 years, and water and landfill charges will be tracking in a similar direction.

Europe is similarly undergoing its own financial worries, with significantly higher levels of unemployment, inflation and national debts than Australia. But can we learn from our European cities? What have I taken away from the last few weeks? The lessons I’ve learned can be grouped into four areas:

It’s not the size that counts.

First and foremost is the question of building size – it really isn’t how much you’ve got, it’s what you do with it that counts. Many of the offices, houses and apartments I saw were simply smaller – there was less space available and a much greater demand for what there was, and so small apartments were the rule rather than the exception. There were also many more good design and good technology solutions for coping with small spaces – whether new development or retrofits. The bottom line is that smaller homes are cheaper to run – how much less would a 100 square metre apartment cost to operate than a 150 square metre apartment?

Small equals savings.

The cars you see in European capital cities are also smaller on average than those in Australia. Whole days would go by without me seeing a big 4WD or people-mover, with everyone using bicycle share schemes, public transport or chic little cars (many of which were, in turn, either car share schemes or rechargeable cars). Small cars are just cheaper to run, and often have a comparable safety rating to larger cars, especially when considering where and how they are most often driven.

Old world ideas for a new age.

Most of Europe’s older buildings were built at a time when ‘sustainability’ was not a buzz-word – they depended upon natural ventilation and natural daylight, shading from the sun, eaves, shutters, balconies on which to grow plants, dry washing and sit outside, and thick walls and insulated roofs to keep the buildings cool in summer and warm in winter. Many of these older buildings, therefore, have good opportunities for retrofitting, now that we can combine good passive design with good technologies and good behaviour.

Adjusting expectations.

Because smaller apartments and cars, and often older buildings, are the norm, people have different expectations. Sure, they might want the latest in modern convenience, but what was most readily available was small and traditional and so the expectations were lower. Certainly the dreams of a European first-time home owner do not equal a 250 square metre house and land package with double garage thrown in, but a small apartment in a walk-up block close to public transport. In Europe I heard many times that the percentage deposit needed for a mortgage was much higher; in turn this helps to keep expectations lower because the smaller the purchase, the smaller the deposit needed.

[…]

Read the full article by Robin Mellon on the Fifth Estate.


Water Sensitive Cities Tour 2012: Project snapshots

Posted in Research by Kate Archdeacon on June 21st, 2012


Photo of the Isar River in Munich by Marcio Cabral de Moura via flickr CC

From “Water Sensitive Cities 2012 Study Tour Group return home“:

The Water Sensitive Cities 2012 Study Tour group, comprising of 18 young water professionals from across Australia, have now completed the overseas leg of their trip. The group travelled to Singapore, the UK, Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands to develop their knowledge of integrated water management and to draw out relevant learnings that can aid Australia in moving towards a Water Sensitive City.

Tour participant Nicole Sexton, Senior Planner Strategy and Sustainability from Barwon Water, produced a poster presentation for the Healthy Cities Conference in Geelong on 6-8 June. The poster provides a snapshot of the sites that the group visited.

Click here to view the poster.


Inclusive Growth, Welfare and Development Policy: International Forum

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on May 29th, 2012

29 June , 2012



This one-day Forum will be hosted by the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences in partnership with the Brotherhood of St Laurence. The Forum aims to bridge the divide between welfare and social policy, and development practice through the prism of ‘inclusive growth’.

Drawing upon the expertise of leading international policymakers and academics in the field, the Forum will explore the following salient themes:

  1. Critiquing the theoretical underpinning of growth and development
  2. Examining welfare state perspectives on inclusive growth and social/economic development
  3. Presenting lessons learned and best practices from developing and developed economies

These themes will be explored at four sessions during the one-day Forum titled:

  • The Inclusive Growth Paradigm
  • Inclusive Growth and Development
  • Inclusive Growth and Welfare
  • Development, Welfare and Policy Practice
Friday 29 June 2012

Public Lecture Theatre Old Arts Building, University of Melbourne

$60 per person including morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea.

Register at http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/bslforum

For enquiries contact Tamsin Courtney tamsinc@unimelb.edu.au


Public Art, Spatial Practices and the City: Panel Discussion

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on May 8th, 2012

10 May , 2012
7:00 pmto8:30 pm


Image via words@bldg50

Panel Discussion: Public Art, Spatial Practices and the City

What role and form does Public Art have in the City and its future/s? In imagining the city, ideas of community and culture, and their dynamic interrelations, can be obscured within a focus on physical and built forms. Artist John Vella’s public lecture will examine the matrix of Public Art in the contemporary city, with a focus on spatial practice. Drawing upon recent shifts in conceptions of ‘place-making’ that attempt to take greater account of socio-cultural dynamics, can spatial practice be imagined more broadly – as a platform and medium for dialogue in the city? For articulating ‘the right to the city’? For reconnecting people to place via Public Art ‘place-making’ as a relational activity? For imagining futures and producing public space, whether utopian or pragmatic?

Join us for a public discussion with:

  • John Vella (Speaker) – a practicing artist and Head of Sculpture, Tasmanian School of Art.
  • Dr Mick Douglas (Discussant) – an artist-researcher and lecturer at the School of Architecture and Design, RMIT University.
  • Dr Ruth Fazakerley (Discussant) – a researcher at the School of Architecture and Design, RMIT University.
  • Dr James Oliver (Chair) – an artist-researcher and lecturer at the Centre for Cultural Partnerships. VCA University of Melbourne

Thursday, 10 May 2012 at 7PM.
RMIT Building 50, Orr St, Carlton.
Entry by gold coin donation. Refreshment provided.

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