Posts Tagged ‘stormwater’

Food-Security and Water-Security in the Urban Context

Posted in Research, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on June 20th, 2013

 

Image: CRC for Water-Sensitive Cities

Image: CRC for Water-Sensitive Cities

From The urban water-energy-food nexus by Prof. Tony Wong:

[…]

Australia’s water consumption is dominated by agricultural uses, followed by consumptions in cities (domestic and industrial) and for electricity generation principally to meet demands in our cities. Our communities have an important role in managing demands. Our consumption of food, energy and water remains inefficient. We waste more than 30% of food produced, we are only beginning to recycle our wastewater for non-drinking purposes, and we do not capture and use the ‘waste heat’ from our electricity production. Transforming our cities to a more sustainable and efficient consumption of resources require socio-technical approaches, starting with a concerted effort to foster community awareness and behavioural change for efficient consumption of water, energy and food. Exploiting the water-energy nexus in urban development, such as district-level tri-generation and the further utilisation of available heat for water disinfection and production of district-level reticulation of hot water, are simple cathartic initiatives to lead this transformation.

The creation of productive landscapes is emerging as a core element of urban green infrastructure strategies. Our cities are water supply catchments with the combined stormwater and wastewater resources exceeding the water consumption in most Australian cities. These resources may be exploited to support a greener city for a multitude of liveability objectives, including the support of productive landscapes ranging from community gardens, to orchards and urban forests.

>> Read the full article by Prof. Tony Wong on the CRC for Water-Sensitive Cities website.


Royal Park Stormwater Harvesting: Case Study

Posted in Models by Kate Archdeacon on May 17th, 2013

08_Rushwright_landscapearchitecture_Royal_Park
Photo: Michael Wright, David Simmonds via Landezine

It’s nearly winter and hopefully time to replenish some of our urban water sources.  Clearwater has recently published a great case study on the Royal Park Stormwater Harvesting project, which has evolved since its launch in 2006:

“The 1984 Royal Park Master Plan proposed the development of a wetland, which would provide a range of benefits to the local community. In 1998, following on from this preliminary idea, a stormwater harvesting system was included in the Master Plan, and the conceptual design was finalised in 2004. When Melbourne hosted the Commonwealth Games in 2006, there was a strong push for environmental initiatives. Given that the chosen site for the Athlete’s Village was adjacent to the proposed wetland location, the construction of the Village became the main driver to implement the wetland and stormwater harvesting project. It was completed in time for the 2006 Commonwealth Games and the area was included in the secure recreation zone of the Athlete’s Village.

Stormwater is diverted from an open Melbourne Water stormwater drain, which collects water from a 187ha catchment area. The diversion structure, which also acts as a sediment trap, allows only low flows into the constructed wetland which is 0.8ha in size. The treated water then flows into a 12ML storage basin, which allows overflow into Moonee Ponds Creek. This storage space was supplemented in 2008 by a 5ML underground tank, situated below one of the sporting fields. To ensure the water is fit-for-purpose, it is treated with UV light and held in a distribution tank prior to use for irrigation of the neighbouring golf course, sports ovals and parkland. To minimise human health risks, the water is applied at night-time through spray irrigation. The system has a back-up supply with a connection to potable mains water. Two water hydrants are also located in an adjacent street to allow trucks to fill up and use the treated water for irrigation of streetscape features.”

Read the full article on Clearwater’s site for more details and great pictures, or to download the case study as a PDF.

>> clearwater.asn.au/content/royal-park-stormwater-harvesting-project


How to build a raingarden: Workshop

Posted in Events by kheffer on October 26th, 2012

30 October , 2012
4:30 pmto6:30 pm

Hobsons Bay City Council’s My Smart Garden program helps residents use their backyards or balconies to grow their own food, shade their homes, use water wisely and recycle wastes.  For more free events, gardening advice, prizes and discounts from local nurseries join My Smart Garden at www.mysmartgarden.org.au


Raingardens popping up at tram and bus Stops

Posted in Models, Movements by Jessica Bird on October 25th, 2012

Source: Melbourne Water


Photo by Melbourne Water via flickr CC

From the Melbourne Water media release ‘Be part of the count toward 10,000 Raingardens

A new public awareness campaign is encouraging Melburnians to build stormwater-filtering ‘raingardens’ to prevent pollution from entering our rivers and creeks. As part of Melbourne Water’s 10,000 Raingardens campaign, commuters will sit among larger-than-life raingarden simulations at tram stops across Melbourne, showing how easily they can help protect local waterways at home.

General Manager Waterways, David Ryan, said stormwater pollution was the biggest threat to the health of the region’s 8400km of rivers and creeks, with the problem increasing the more Melbourne grew. “Stormwater damages our waterways in two ways: by picking up and transporting pollutants and causing erosion,” said Mr Ryan. “Stormwater run-off is the number one polluter of rivers and creeks because of the pollution it carries, such as litter, chemicals and excess nutrients. In urban areas, stormwater runoff flows much faster and there is a lot more of it, compared with undeveloped areas, which causes river bank erosion and threatens the habitat of native animals such as platypus and fish. Raingardens capture stormwater and filter it through layers of sandy soil and plants, which helps slow the rate of runoff to reduce erosion and absorb pollutants that would otherwise end up in rivers and creeks,” he said.

Melbourne Water’s Raingardens campaign aims to see 10,000 raingardens built across Melbourne backyards by 2013.

You can read the full media release here. For more information on raingardens, or how to build one visit raingardens.melbournewater.com.au

 

[Keep an eye out for the raingardens at tram and bus stops across Melbourne. Good places to start include, St Kilda Road, Chadstone Shopping Centre, St Kilda Junction, near Camberwell Market, and the bus exchange in Moonee Ponds. – JB]


Stormwater Harvesting in Geelong: Case studies

Posted in Models by Kate Archdeacon on July 10th, 2012

Source: Clearwater

From Geelong Stormwater Harvesting Projects:

The City of Greater Geelong has embarked upon a number of stormwater harvesting projects to reduce the City’s potable water use and maintain green open space and recreational assets. Two of these projects are detailed below.

Kardinia Park is an open space precinct that includes Simonds Stadium, home to the Geelong Football Club, and a number of other football/cricket ovals. The precinct is an important asset in the sporting and cultural identity of the Greater Geelong. The stormwater harvesting system diverts stormwater runoff from a 30ha area of Newtown and from nearby roofs and playing fields into a new underground storage tank. Water is drawn from this storage tank and used to irrigate the AFL ground’s playing surface and other surrounding ovals. The scheme is expected to save 13 megalitres of potable water per year.

Grinter Reserve was a product of the City’s Sustainable Water Use Plan developed or established in 2006. Stormwater from a conventional drainage system from an adjacent 200ha residential suburb is diverted into a constructed wetland in Grinter Reserve. Additional water sourced from the ‘Splashdown’ aquatic facility located within the Reserve allows approximately 30 megalitres of cleaned water to supply 100% of the irrigation demand for the reserve, providing ecological habitat and amenity and eliminating the need for potable water.

Read the full case studies on the Clearwater website.


Streetscape Raingarden Design Principles: Guide

Posted in Models, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on May 28th, 2012


From the reference guide.
-

Sourced from Clearwater :

This A3 Quick Reference Guide will introduce the reader to the basics of streetscape raingarden design. The guide indentifies the critical elements for a good design as well as some tips for what to watch out for. Links are provided for more technical guidance and to video clips on how to build a raingarden.

http://www.clearwater.asn.au/content/streetscape-raingarden-design-principles


Water-Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) Tour – Stonnington & Port Phillip

Posted in Events, Movements by Kate Archdeacon on September 28th, 2011

14 October , 2011
8:50 amto1:30 pm
Source: Clearwater

Clearwater’s latest tour highlights an array of WSUD stormwater treatment measures and harvesting systems across the City of Stonnington & Port Phillip.

Council experts and design consultants will be onsite to provide insights into the development and management of each project, discussing challenges, learnings and outcomes from concept to completion. This tour will visit tree pits, raingardens in both commercial and residential areas, stormwater harvest systems designed for open space irrigation and vehicle washdown sites. You will gain an insight into project goals, costs, engineering, landscaping and maintenance considerations and community engagement. The tour will include visits to 7 sites; morning tea; sit down networking lunch. Suitable for anyone involved in sustainable water planning or asset maintenance / design, including developers, planners, architects, environment and maintenance staff.

8:50AM – 1:30PM, Friday 14th October 2011

Meeting point to be advised upon booking your place.

The City of Port Phillip Water Plan is a great example of a municipal strategy, that sets long term integrated water management targets and promotes a water sensitive approach to urban water management. The plan sets considerable targets for reduction in council and community mains water consumption, and promotes the substitution of mains supply with alternative water sources where appropriate. Pollution reduction targets are set to be achieved through an increase in water sensitive urban design (WSUD) projects in road, drainage, and streetscape works.

The City of Port Phillip Water Plan recently won the 2011 Stormwater Victoria Excellence Awards in the category of Research, Innovation, Policy and Education.

Read more about the City of Port Phillip Water Plan.


10,000 Raingardens Program: Add yours to the list

Posted in Movements, Research by Kate Archdeacon on September 20th, 2011

Melbourne Water’s 10,000 Raingardens Program promotes a new, responsible way of gardening so everybody can create their own water sensitive garden and do their bit to help the environment and protect our rivers and creeks.

The aim of the program is to show you how easy it is to create a water efficient garden in your own backyard. By building a raingarden you will enjoy the benefits of a self watering, low maintenance garden while also contributing to healthier waterways by reducing the amount of pollutants that would otherwise wash into our rivers and creeks. Until now we have been working with local councils and the community to create raingardens in public spaces such as streets, parks and schools. The program has recently expanded and we are now providing easy, step by step instructions so people can design, build and maintain raingardens in their own homes. Our target is to see 10,000 raingardens built across Melbourne by 2013. To achieve this we need your help.

>>Find out what a raingarden is, why you should build a raingarden and how to build one.  (And then add yours to the Map!)

http://raingardens.melbournewater.com.au/


Urban stormwater: Public nuisance or precious resource?

Posted in Events, Research by land-environment on September 12th, 2011

21 September , 2011
5:30 pmto7:30 pm

Speaker: Associate Professor Tim Fletcher

Urbanisation results in major disturbance to the water cycle, with infiltration and evapotranspiration greatly reduced and the volume and rate of runoff greatly increased. Resulting pollution and degradation of receiving waters is one of the major threats to waterways in Australia and around the world. At the same time, water shortages in cities have resulted in stormwater being considered seriously for the first time as an alternative water resource. This presentation will focus on a new approach, which aims to retain and use stormwater within the catchment, rehydrating urban landscapes, and protecting receiving waters from degradation. It will present as a case study the innovative long-term catchment-scale experiment – the Little Stringybark Creek Project – discussing social, economic and technical lessons for stormwater management.

To register, please visit: http://www.land-environment.unimelb.edu.au/deanslectures/fletcher/

Wednesday 21st September
Time: 5.30pm

Location: Lower Theatre, Melbourne School of Land and Environment building, University of Melbourne


Australian Stormwater Harvesting Guidelines

Posted in Movements, Research by Kate Archdeacon on August 22nd, 2011

 Source: Clearwater

Are you undertaking a stormwater harvesting project or water augmentation project that requires you to consider water treatment?

Clearwater has prepared a simple diagram to help you familiarise yourself with the relevant national guidelines available on our website. There are no specific laws that dictate what stormwater can be used for or what quality standards stormwater must meet, however responsible parties have a duty of care to make sure their scheme will not place people or the environment at risk.  Guidance on how to meet duty of care is provided in the Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling: Stormwater Harvest and Reuse (Phase 2). The Australian Guidelines provide guidance on water standards for various reuse and recycling scenarios, and were prepared in two phases.

Phase 1 – Managing Health and Environmental Risks (2006) which provides a framework for the management of recycled water. Phase 2 – A set of three guidelines providing more detail on:

Underpinning the Water Recycling Guidelines are the 2004 Australian Drinking Water Guidelines (currently being reviewed). This document provides the water supply industry with guidance on what constitutes good drinking water quality and are referred to both phases of the Australian Guidelines for Water recycling.

http://www.clearwater.asn.au/content/relevant-national-guidelines-stormwater-harvesting