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Climate Change Science: Impacts and Adaptation for Victoria Public Lecture & Symposium

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on August 24th, 2012

20 September , 2012
21 September , 2012
Climate Change Science: Impacts and Adaptation for Victoria Public Lecture & Symposium

This is one of a series of annual Royal Society Victoria Symposia on Scientific issues of importance to Victoria. It will consist of formal presentations and panel discussions on three aspects of the science of climate change.

  • The Physical Science
  • Impacts on Victoria
  • Adaptation to Climate Change

Speakers are leading academics from Universities, CSIRO, Bureau of Meteorology and the State Government. Most speakers have played leading roles in the assessments of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

The intended audience is University staff and students, Royal Society of Victoria members, representatives of planning authorities and the state government, and the general public.

ABOUT THE SYMPOSIUM:

Understanding and managing the risks of climate extremes are important challenges for Australian scientists as well as for planners and politicians.

  • The Physical Science: Talks and panel sessions on the observational record, on the major climate drivers for Victoria, on the science of climate change projections and on the science of extreme weather events.
  • Impacts on Victoria: Talks have been invited on the impacts on health, on water supply for cities and agriculture, and on sea-level rise and coastal inundation
  • Adaptation to Climate Change: Adaptation addresses options for reducing exposure and vulnerability to changing climate and its impacts. It also addresses options for increasing resilience to the potential adverse impacts of climate extremes.

The proceedings of the Symposium will appear as a special issue (in 2013) of the peer-reviewed journal: Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria.

Symposium: Friday 21 September 9.00 am – 5.00 pm and Saturday 22 September 9.30 am – 1 p.m

>> Click here to find out more about the symposium.

Free Public Lecture: Thursday 20 September 

>> Click here for registration for the free lecture.

The Symposium and Lecture will be held at University of Melbourne in the Basement Theatre, Spot Building, (cnr Berkeley and Pelham Streets, Parkville) University of Melbourne.


Climate Change Is Real: an open letter from the scientific community

Posted in Movements, Opinion, Research by Kate Archdeacon on June 15th, 2011


Photo: California Academy of Sciences, the line attributed to Wallace Broecker, Scientist, by jinxmcc via flickr CC

The Conversation launches a two-week series from the nation’s top minds on the science behind climate change and the efforts of “sceptics” to cloud the debate.

The overwhelming scientific evidence tells us that human greenhouse gas emissions are resulting in climate changes that cannot be explained by natural causes. Climate change is real, we are causing it, and it is happening right now.

Like it or not, humanity is facing a problem that is unparalleled in its scale and complexity. The magnitude of the problem was given a chilling focus in the most recent report of the International Energy Agency, which their chief economist characterised as the “worst news on emissions.” Limiting global warming to 2°C is now beginning to look like a nearly insurmountable challenge.

Like all great challenges, climate change has brought out the best and the worst in people. A vast number of scientists, engineers, and visionary businessmen are boldly designing a future that is based on low-impact energy pathways and living within safe planetary boundaries; a future in which substantial health gains can be achieved by eliminating fossil-fuel pollution; and a future in which we strive to hand over a liveable planet to posterity. At the other extreme, understandable economic insecurity and fear of radical change have been exploited by ideologues and vested interests to whip up ill-informed, populist rage, and climate scientists have become the punching bag of shock jocks and tabloid scribes. Aided by a pervasive media culture that often considers peer-reviewed scientific evidence to be in need of “balance” by internet bloggers, this has enabled so-called “sceptics” to find a captive audience while largely escaping scrutiny.

Australians have been exposed to a phony public debate which is not remotely reflected in the scientific literature and community of experts. Beginning today [Sunday June 13], The Conversation will bring much-needed and long-overdue accountability to the climate “sceptics.” For the next two weeks, our series of daily analyses will show how they can side-step the scientific literature and how they subvert normal peer review. They invariably ignore clear refutations of their arguments and continue to promote demonstrably false critiques.

We will show that “sceptics” often show little regard for truth and the critical procedures of the ethical conduct of science on which real skepticism is based. The individuals who deny the balance of scientific evidence on climate change will impose a heavy future burden on Australians if their unsupported opinions are given undue credence. The signatories below jointly authored this article, and some may also contribute to the forthcoming series of analyses.

Are you a scientist? Do you agree? If you’d like to add your name to the list, send an email to megan.clement@theconversation.edu.au The next installment in our series is from Karl Braganza at the Bureau of Meteorology. The greenhouse effect is real: here’s why.

Go to the original article on The Conversation to read the list of signatories – it’s far too big to include here!


The recent extreme weather: A scientific perspective

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on February 25th, 2011

1 March , 2011
6:00 pmto7:30 pm


Image: NASA Goddard Photo and Video via flickr CC

From monster cyclones in Queensland to floods in Victoria, bushfires in Perth, heat waves in Russia, snow storms in Europe… in the last year the world in general, and Australia in particular, seem to have experienced a large number of extreme weather events. Were these events due to normal climate fluctuations or to climate change? – And does this question even make sense? Please join us to hear from prominent climate scientists about how unusual these events were and what the science knows – and doesn’t know – about what caused them.

How extreme is the recent extreme weather?
Dr Karl Braganza, Manager of Climate Monitoring at the National Climate Centre of the Bureau of Meteorology
La Niña, cyclones, mozzies, and myxo
Professor Neville Nicholls, ARC Professorial Fellow in the School of Geography and Environmental Science at Monash University, and President of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society
Extreme weather and climate change
Professor David Karoly, ARC Federation Fellow and Professor of Meteorology in the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne

Tuesday, 1 March 2011, 6:00–7:30 pm
Village Roadshow Theatrette, State Library of Victoria (Entry 3, 179 La Trobe Street, Melbourne)

All welcome and no bookings required.
For further information, contact: msi-seminars “at” monash.edu

Presented by the Monash Sustainability Institute, the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, and the Melbourne Centre of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society.