Posts Tagged ‘policy’

Food City: City of Melbourne Food Policy available online

Posted in Policies by Kate Archdeacon on November 14th, 2012

Photo from the City of Melbourne Food Policy

Over the past year, the City of Melbourne has been developing its Food Policy, with requests for public input at two different stages during that time – first, as responses to the discussion paper, and second, as responses to the draft policy.  Now the final policy is available online.  The sections of the policy are:

  • Policy statement
  • Introduction
  • Vision
  • Themes and ambitions
    • a strong, food secure community
    • healthy food choices for all
    • a sustainable and resilient food system
    • a thriving local food economy
    • a city that celebrates food
  • Implementation and evaluation
  • References
  • Glossary

The next stage will involve the development of the Implementation Plan – register for updates with the Food Policy team at

>> Food Policy website.

Waste and Resource Recovery Policy: Open for comment

Posted in Seeking by Kate Archdeacon on November 1st, 2012

From the Draft Victorian Waste and Resource Recovery Policy

The Victorian Coalition Government is asking Victorians to help shape the future of waste minimization efforts, ensuring less material goes to landfill and increasing recycling rates.

Minister for Environment and Climate Change Ryan Smith [has] unveiled the Draft Victorian Waste and Resource Recovery Policy for community comment. The policy is designed to help transform the state’s waste management system by setting a long term vision for waste management and resource recovery in Victoria, along with a range of actions to be undertaken over the next 10 years.

“While Victorians are recycling more than ever before, the state?s increased population and the growth in discarded consumer items has seen annual waste generation grow from eight million tonnes in 2000 to around 12.1 million tonnes in 2011,” Mr Smith said. “We want to prevent more waste going into landfill so the environment doesn?t keep paying the price for our consumption.” Mr Smith said based on evidence over the past decade, Victoria’s growing population rate and waste generation trends could, if not tackled, see a 45 per cent increase in waste generation over the next 10 years.

“The priority now is to put in place strong and positive measures to reduce waste and increase recycling,” Mr Smith said. “We must do more to focus our recycling and resource recovery efforts on the materials where there is a strong market demand. “We don’t just want to keep material out of landfill, we want to make sure that something productive is done with it so that it doesn’t become waste in the first place. A strong market based operation will help us achieve that goal,” Mr Smith said. “Our draft policy represents an opportunity to drive further significant and positive environmental reform and demonstrates that we will be doing things differently.

Comments are invited until 23 November 2012.


How can instinctive preferences improve policy outcomes?

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on August 6th, 2012

21 August , 2012
6:00 pmto7:00 pm

Photo by bupowski via flickr CC

Hosted by Grattan Institute and The Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG)

Why do people in some countries donate organs more than in others? Why do we not save enough for retirement even when we can afford to? Why don’t we buy energy-efficient appliances that save us money in the long run? How can more people be encouraged to live healthily?

Around the world, policy makers have begun to pay attention to the growing field of behavioural economics. Instead of assuming that citizens are the rational, interest-maximising agents of economics textbooks, behavioural economics starts with the more realistic assumption that people are shaped by cognitive biases, complications and limitations. Our rationality, self-control and self-interest are all bounded in ways that have implications for the way we design and implement public policies.

In this seminar John Daley will discuss with Donald Low and George Argyrous how behavioural economics can be applied to the design of public policy.

August 21, 6pm – 7pm
BMW Edge, Federation Square

>> Register to attend this free event here.

Inclusive Growth, Welfare and Development Policy: International Forum

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on May 29th, 2012

29 June , 2012

This one-day Forum will be hosted by the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences in partnership with the Brotherhood of St Laurence. The Forum aims to bridge the divide between welfare and social policy, and development practice through the prism of ‘inclusive growth’.

Drawing upon the expertise of leading international policymakers and academics in the field, the Forum will explore the following salient themes:

  1. Critiquing the theoretical underpinning of growth and development
  2. Examining welfare state perspectives on inclusive growth and social/economic development
  3. Presenting lessons learned and best practices from developing and developed economies

These themes will be explored at four sessions during the one-day Forum titled:

  • The Inclusive Growth Paradigm
  • Inclusive Growth and Development
  • Inclusive Growth and Welfare
  • Development, Welfare and Policy Practice
Friday 29 June 2012

Public Lecture Theatre Old Arts Building, University of Melbourne

$60 per person including morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea.

Register at

For enquiries contact Tamsin Courtney

Social justice and adaptation to sea-level rise in Gippsland East: Seminar

Posted in Events, Research by Kate Archdeacon on May 10th, 2012

24 May , 2012
12:00 pmto1:00 pm

Photo by F.d.W. via flickr CC

The Brotherhood of St Laurence, Research & Policy Centre invites you to attend these free lunchtime seminars:

Professor Jon Barnett, Resource Management and Geography, University of Melbourne

As knowledge and modeling of the risks of sea-level rise builds momentum so too does the need to begin processes to adapt to avoid these risks. This seminar will be an informal discussion of an ongoing ARC Linkage Project in Gippsland East which aims to understand the equity dimensions of climate change for small coastal communities. Amongst the research locales are Lakes Entrance, Port Albert, Seaspray, Manns Beach and McLoughlins Beach. We will present findings about policy-makers’ views of the ‘problem’ in this area, and emerging insights about the nature of social justice with respect to adaptation to sea-level rise.

Jon Barnett is a Professor in the Department of Resource Management and Geography at Melbourne University. He is a political geographer whose research investigates the impacts of and responses to climate change on social systems, with a focus on risks to human insecurity, hunger, violent conflict, and water stress. He has done extensive field-work in the South Pacific, China, and East Timor. Jon is convenor of the national research network on the social, economic and institutional dimensions of climate change, which is part of the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, and is a Lead Author for the forthcoming Fifth Assessment Report of the IPCC. Jon is co-lead investigator on this project, along with Professor Ruth Fincher from the Geography program at the University of Melbourne, and Dr Anna Hurlimann, who is a Senior Lecturer in Urban Planning at Melbourne University.

12noon-1pm, Thursday 24 May

Brotherhood of St Laurence, 67 Brunswick Street, Fitzroy in Father Tucker’s Room

>>RSVP to attend this event here

A smart and resilient water system for a liveable, sustainable and productive Melbourne

Posted in Policies, Research, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on April 26th, 2012

Image from the Implementation Plan summary

The Living Melbourne, Living Victoria Roadmap was released in March 2011. It outlined the recommended priorities for reform to support achievement of the Government’s objectives for urban water. The newly released Living Melbourne Living Victoria Implementation Plan outlines the [Ministerial Advisory Council] MAC’s final recommendations for changes needed to the urban water system to achieve a more sustainable, liveable Melbourne and Victoria.

From “Sense breaks through water debate” by Carolyn Boyd:

[A] new report in Victoria finds this: “the current system does not adequately support the use of alternative water sources (e.g. rainwater and storm water) for non-drinking needs”.


Among a raft of other suggestions, the findings push for stronger building controls to catch stormwater at its source and store it – in some cases in rainwater tanks at properties, and in others in storage tanks big enough for a whole urban precinct. When we have situations where more storm water flows out of a city each year than the city consumes (as is the case in Melbourne), it does seem crazy not to be tapping into the stuff as it falls from the sky.

The strategy aims to reduce the demand for mains water by using stormwater for non-drinking functions such as flushing toilets and washing clothes, and continues to support greater water efficiency in homes through low-use appliances and tap fittings.

The report suggests improved standards should apply to all new and significantly renovated buildings in Victoria. The report models the outcomes of capturing more storm water and provides some interesting insights. One of the scenarios uses a combination of enhanced household water efficiency and rainwater tanks to provide water for toilets, laundry and gardens. In this scenario, mains water was assumed to be used for personal washing and in the kitchen.

The modelling estimated these changes would cut potable water demand by 24 per cent, and lead to a 9 per cent drop in stormwater runoff and an 11 per cent fall in the amount of wastewater being discharged across greater Melbourne by 2050.

In another scenario, domestic rainwater was used for hot water and laundry, while storm water was collected and stored at a precinct or suburb-level, and supplied to households for toilet flushing and gardens. The modelling shows the above would deliver a 38 per cent cut in mains water demand, an 11 per cent drop ?in stormwater runoff and a 32 per cent fall in the wastewater being discharged across greater Melbourne by 2050.

Putting the argument for better water collection in residences, the report noted that larger infrastructure, such as dams and desal plants had a “lumpy, long lead time” and run “much higher risks of saddling customers and/or taxpayers with excessive or unneeded investment” – as many residents across Australia are arguing they are now finding with various desalination plants.

Read the full article by Carolyn Boyd, or read more about Living Melbourne, Living Victoria.

Draft food policy consultation: City of Melbourne

Posted in Models, Seeking by Kate Archdeacon on March 28th, 2012

The City of Melbourne draft food policy is now available and we would like to hear your thoughts.

Attend our Draft Food Policy Conversation event to be held on:

When: Thursday 29 March 2012, 3–7pm
Where: City Library, Majorca Room, Level 1, 253 Flinders Lane (accessible venue)
Light refreshments provided

This event is self-directed, so stop in when it is convenient for you and visit the information stations and take up an opportunity to talk to staff and share your questions and comments.

About the Policy:

The draft food policy provides a vision and a framework to work towards a more sustainable food system in the City of Melbourne to ensure all residents, workers, students and visitors have sufficient access to healthy, safe and affordable food, now and into the future.

The development of the draft food policy has been informed by background research through the food policy discussion paper and a series of consultation processes including postcard surveys and forums where we collected community views on what food means to you.

The draft food policy identifies five key themes for action, these include:

  • Strong, food-secure communities
  • Health and wellness for all
  • A sustainable and resilient food system
  • A vibrant local economy
  • A city that celebrates food
Download the draft food policy and the discussion paper from the City of Melbourne website.

The closing date for feedback is 5pm on Friday 13 April 2012.

Victorian Small and Community Scale Wind Workshop

Posted in Events, Policies by Enhar on February 7th, 2012

9 February , 2012
10:00 amto1:30 pm

Planning Issues for Small Wind and Community Wind in Victoria

In Victoria, proponents of wind turbine projects for domestic, business and community
use, although smaller in scale than large wind farms, may be asked to satisfy the same
environmental criteria as a large wind farm. Meanwhile, local authority decision-makers
are faced with ambiguities in the planning system on how to respond to applications for
small wind turbines: when are proposals exempt from the new 2km restrictions for

Wind projects which are smaller than large commercial wind farms may have a lower
impact on the landscape and the environment. Planning controls for large wind farms in
Victoria may not always be applied to small wind projects, but how should local
authorities in Victoria determine what constitutes an acceptable smaller wind project?

Enhar is organising this event to cater for those who are motivated to find answers to
these questions.

Date & Time:
Thursday 9th Feb
2012 from 10am – 1:30pm

Gravell Room
Brunswick Business Incubator
420 Victoria Street
Brunswick 3056, Melbourne

$50+GST including light lunch

Demian Natakhan: Director, Enhar:
“A case for clearer planning guidance for small wind in Victoria”

John Phillips: Acting Director, Department of Planning and Community Development, Victorian Government:
“Existing planning controls for small wind in Victoria”

Energy, Transport, Housing & Summer Reading for the PM: Grattan Podcasts

Posted in Opinion, Research by Kate Archdeacon on December 22nd, 2011

Source: Grattan Institute

Photo by El Pei via flickr CC

Australia’s energy future was considered in a seminar series that Grattan Institute ran jointly this year with the Melbourne Energy Institute. Webcasts are available for the final two seminars on the future of solar power and transport.

Grattan’s report Getting the housing we want was launched on November 21 by Cities Program Director Jane-Frances Kelly in conversation with former Victorian Premier, John Brumby.  Transcripts and recordings of the launch are available, as is the report.

Every year Grattan Institute produces its Summer Reading List for the Prime Minister. The list contains books and articles that we found stimulating and a pleasure to read, and that we believe the PM, or indeed any Australian, should read over the break.  Watch the launch or download the reading list.

Melbourne’s Food Policy: Get Involved

Posted in Events, Movements, Seeking by Kate Archdeacon on November 4th, 2011

16 November , 2011
6:00 pmto8:30 pm
17 November , 2011
9:30 amto12:00 pm

You have the opportunity to shape the future of food in the City of Melbourne and we’d love you to get involved – we’re engaging with stakeholders, industry organisations and the community. The Food Policy discussion paper is now available. The closing date for feedback is COB Friday 9 December, 2011.

Food Forums:

City of Melbourne will be holding food conversations in November. The following two dates are confirmed, check back for further details of any subsequent sessions:

  • Industry / Stakeholder Food Conversation
    • Date: Thursday 17 November Time: 9.30am – 12pm (Morning Tea provided)
    • Venue: Melbourne Town Hall – Supper Room, 120 Swanston Street, Melbourne
    • RSVP to:
  • Community / Residents Conversation
    • Date: Wednesday 16 November Time: 6pm – 8.30pm (light refreshments provided)
    • Venue: Visy Park (Carlton Football Club) – George Harris Function Room, Royal Parade, Carlton North
    • RSVP to:

What does food mean to you? Keep your eye out for our reply paid postcard at City of Melbourne libraries, community centres and recreation centres. Complete the card and return it to us by 30 November for your chance to win an iPad2!

Extract from the Food Policy Discussion Paper:

Melbourne is world-renowned for the quality of its food and its liveability, and we want it to stay that way.

We want to make sure that everyone in Melbourne can enjoy good food, now and reliably into the future. For many of us, Melbourne’s food is a cause for celebration – we have ready access to a wide variety of high-quality foods all year-round, which we enjoy at home and in a diverse and thriving scene of cafes, restaurants, bars and other outlets. These and other related businesses are an important part of our local economy, providing diverse jobs, opportunities and enterprise.

For others, there are real challenges in consistently being able to get the food they need. Limited choices often combined with poor physical or economic access undermines health and contributes to food insecurity. Those of us who do have ready access to the foods we want also often eat in ways that undermine our health.

It is increasingly apparent that food systems and the health of the natural systems that support them (our land, water and atmosphere) are unsustainable. The need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, adapt to a changing climate and reduce oil vulnerability in the food system, are pressing. These issues are emerging as important global concerns. Cities around the world are recognising the important role they can play in leading and catalysing change towards healthy, sustainable, fair and resilient food systems.

The community has articulated a vision for Melbourne as a “bold, inspirational and sustainable city” – this discussion paper starts the conversation about what this means for food.

Find out more on the City of Melbourne website.