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Posts Tagged ‘future visions’

Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037

Posted in Research, Visions by Jessica Bird on October 23rd, 2012

Image by D. Armellin

A local resilience-building project about climate extremes.

Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 is part of a larger research project Transforming Institutions for Climate Extremes. This project is led by Che Biggs at the Victorian Eco-Innovation Lab (VEIL) at the University of Melbourne. It aims to understand how communities and institutions can prepare and become more resilient to disruptive climate conditions. Anglesea was chosen as an ideal case-study site because it faces multiple climate hazards such as fire, drought and sea level rise but it also has a creative community and a strong local identity.

What is the Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 blog about?

The images and articles you see on the Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 blog are glimpses of possible futures. They depict strategies and ideas about how Anglesea could become more resilient to the more extreme possible impacts of climate change. The ideas represented have been developed from a workshop involving Anglesea community members. In the workshop people were asked to propose adaptation strategies in response to a series of challenging future scenarios that describe Anglesea in the year 2037. These scenarios were built from an assessment of climate model projections, historical records from along the Great Ocean Road and interviews with Anglesea residents. The small number of glimpses you see were combined and synthesised from more than 100 ideas developed in the workshop. Treat them as a window into a range of possible futures that might exist. We encourage you to comment on what is good or not good about the way they respond to challenges from climate change.

Why this project? When managing disaster risk, government and private sector organisations often rely heavily on ‘probability’ or ‘expert’ assessments of the likely type, extent and frequency of negative impacts. This can come unstuck when disasters occur outside what has been predicted and planned for. Transforming Institutions for Climate Extremes is a response to this problem. It responds to the call for new methods to improve community resilience and help communities improve disaster planning. It seeks to explore how prepared our communities, our decision-makers and decision-making processes are for the challenges of ‘new’ climate conditions. It will consider what institutional changes are needed to meet those challenges whilst ensuring community ownership.

Climate change in Anglesea? Anglesea lies in an area of southern Australia that will be affected by climate change in many ways. Climate models project that the most likely direct impacts will include changes to rainfall (drier but with more intense rainfall events), changes in temperature (warmer with more heatwaves), increasing acidity of oceans and rising sea levels. In-turn, these impacts are expected to affect a whole range of factors including increases in coastal erosion and days of extreme fire danger to increased risk of heat-stroke and changes to when plants flower and birds migrate. Climate Change is the effect of heat from the sun being trapped in the Earth’s atmosphere by gases produced by human activity. While some of these gases (like carbon dioxide) are found naturally in the atmosphere, as we increase their concentration above natural levels, they trap more heat from the sun – a bit like an insulation blanket.

You can view the glimpses of a resilient Anglesea in 2037 and comment at You can also like the Facebook page to be kept up to date with the project.

VEIL Exhibition: Sunshine 2032, Stage three

Posted in Events, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on June 12th, 2012

13 June , 2012 10:00 amto17 June , 2012 5:00 pm

Image credit: Jack Pu

The city of Sunshine was designed according to the principles of Ebenezer Howard’s Garden City. The suburban layout combined back yards adequate for a vegetable patch, fruit trees and chickens, with regularly placed public parks for social recreation. The layout remains intact today, but the expansion of transport infrastructure over the years has fractured much of the social space in the suburb. The Garden City layout of Sunshine is suited to the intensification of sustainable programs including urban agriculture, shared water and energy harvesting systems, increased pedestrian and bike access through the neighbourhood and shared public spaces for increased social cohesion.

Following on from our exhibition of ‘Vision: Sunshine 2032’ projects in 2011, VEIL took the design process further and held the studio in the community as a Studio Atelier. Sunshine Plaza Shopping Centre generously provided a vacant shop for the duration of the semester, and we constructed the furnishings as we went along. Being in Sunshine every week has allowed us to become better acquainted with the project sites, the community, and the experience of working, shopping, eating and travelling in the area.  The studio door has literally been kept open, and we have had locals and past residents come in to speak to us, deliver brief lectures on the area, and request inclusions in the projects. VEIL hopes to continue using the Studio Atelier as a model for teaching and co-creating innovative design projects for the future.

This exhibition of selected design projects, developed as part of the Victorian Eco-Innovation Lab (VEIL) Eco-Acupuncture studio program 2009-2012, includes selected Architecture and Landscape Architecture Design projects envisioning a sustainable future for Sunshine [stage one, two and three].

13 – 17 June
Shop 34, Sunshine Plaza 324-328 Hampshire Rd Sunshine
Open Wednesday-Sunday 10am-5pm.

Exhibition launched by Professor Philip Goad, Director of the Melbourne School of Design, Faculty of Architecture Building and Planning, University of Melbourne.

Vision Sunshine 2032: VEIL Exhibition

Posted in Events, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on December 2nd, 2011

6 December , 2011 10:00 amto11 December , 2011 5:00 pm

This exhibition is being hosted by the Victorian Eco Innovation Lab (VEIL). It includes work from University of Melbourne Architecture and Landscape Architecture studios envisioning a sustainable future for Sunshine, as well as a selection of student works from previous studios as part of VEIL’s Eco-Acupuncture studio program 2009-2011.

The exhibition will be launched by Professor Thomas Kvan, Dean, Faculty of Architecture Building and Planning, University of Melbourne.

6 – 11 December
Shop 51, Sunshine Plaza Shopping Centre
324-328 Hampshire Rd

The exhibition is easy to get to via public transport. Download a map.

Open Tuesday-Sunday 10am-5pm.

Sustainable Melbourne is a VEIL project.

Dr. Richard Di Natale: Vision for Australia

Posted in Events by Mark Ogge on November 22nd, 2011

5 December , 2011
6:30 pmto8:00 pm

Beyond Zero Emissions Discussion Group Guest:
Dr Richard Di Natale, Victoria’s first Greens Senator, elected in the 2010 federal election.

The son of Italian migrants, Richard grew up in Melbourne. Prior to entering parliament Richard was a general practitioner and public health specialist. He worked in Aboriginal health in the Northern Territory, on HIV prevention in India and in the drug and alcohol sector. His key health priorities include preventative health, public dental care and responding to the health impacts of climate change. He also actively supports the Landholders’ Right to Refuse Coal Seam Gas Bill 2011.  We welcome Richard to share his vision for Australia.

6:30pm,  Monday December 5

Entry: Gold coin donation

Fritz Loewe Theatre (entry via level 2)
McCoy Building
University of Melbourne
Cnr Elgin & Swanston Streets, Carlton

For more information about our guest, visit the Discussion Group on the Beyond Zero Emissions website.

ECO CITY Melbourne Exhibition

Posted in Events by Ferne Edwards on February 9th, 2009

ECO CITY Melbourne Exhibition

ECO CITY Exhibition more details