Posts Tagged ‘Food’

Fair Food at Fed Square

Posted in Events, Movements by Kate Archdeacon on August 20th, 2013

21 August , 2013
6:30 pmto8:00 pm

FF-Banner

From The Locavore Edition:

It’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the doom and gloom of our current food system. Amidst the pressure from foreign imports, climate change and the supermarket duopoly, we want to discover the silver lining; the hope and innovation amongst it all, and the people who are forging the way towards a Fair Food future.

As part of Fair Food Week and in partnership with the Australian Food Sovereignty Alliance, we are setting out to explore some of the major steps that need to be taken to build opportunity, resilience, sustainability, health and ethics back into our food system. The Fed Square Locavored Series curated by The Locavore Edition and held at The Edge at Federation Square gets to the heart of the matter, identifying the rising stars driving the future of food, farming and culinary culture. This is an unmissable Fair Food Week event with great speakers, important stories and local spirit.

And don’t forget, you can choose a ticket which includes a copy of The Field Guide to Victorian Produce, our handy guidebook which helps locavores find growers, producers and providers.

>>> For tickets and more information visit The Locavore Edition.

 


Urban food security, urban resilience and climate change: Australian report

Posted in Models, Research by Kate Archdeacon on August 2nd, 2013

Guerrilla Garden_fullyreclined_BY
Photo by fullyreclined via flickr CC

The National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF) report on urban food and climate change is now available for download.
Abstract:

Food security is increasingly recognised as a problem in developed countries like Australia as well as in developing countries of the global south, and as a problem facing cities and urban populations in these countries. Despite producing more food than is consumed in Australia, certain groups in particular, places are finding it increasingly difficult to access nutritious and healthy food at affordable prices. Moreover, whole urban populations have found their food supply lines severely compromised by major disasters such as floods and cyclones which are expected to have greater impacts as the climate changes.

This changing landscape of food production, distribution and consumption has drawn attention to the nature of contemporary urban food systems in general and to the security and resilience of urban food systems in particular. This has in turn highlighted the extent of urban agriculture and its potential to play a greater role in strengthening the food security of Australian cities and building urban resilience in a changing climate.

This report presents the results of a synthesis and integrative research project that explored these issues through a critical review of relevant literature and case study research in two cities. It had three main aims:

  • to increase our knowledge of the current extent of urban agriculture in Australian cities;
  • to review its capacity to play a more prominent role in enhancing urban food security and urban resilience and;
  • to assess the impacts of climate change on the capacity of urban agriculture to enhance food security and urban resilience.

The research provides much needed up-to-date information on the extent of current urban agricultural practices, a critical review of good practice in Australia and beyond and an analysis of the opportunities and barriers to the expansion of these practices, especially in the face of climate change.

Visit the website to download the full report.

Please cite this report as:
Burton, P, Lyons, K, Richards, C, Amati, M, Rose, N, Desfours, L, Pires, V, Barclay, R, 2013, Urban food security, urban resilience and climate change, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, Gold Coast, pp.176.


Fair Food Week – Australia’s First

Posted in Events, Movements by Jessica Bird on July 22nd, 2013

19 August , 2013 9:00 amto25 August , 2013 5:00 pm

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Image from fairfoodweek.org.au

From ‘Australia’s First Fair Food Week is Coming‘ by ACFCGN:

FRESH, good and fair food needs a fresh, new and innovative event to demonstrate its value to all Australians. That’s why the Australian Food Sovereignty Alliance are bringing together communities, social entrepreneurs, creative individuals, smart food businesses and even local government across Australia to celebrate the work of Australia’s fair food pioneers – the women and men doing the vital work of creating a fairer food system for all of us.

“It’s a new national event, Fair Food Week”, said Australian Food Sovereignty Alliance spokesman, Nick Rose. Across the country during Fair Food Week there’s a wonderful diversity of events that will attract, intrigue and entertain you: food forums, food workshops, food films, farmers’ fairs, food swaps, community garden and farm tours.

“What we call ’fair food’ is food that is produced in ways that are fair to all and that guarantee nutritional health to everyone in Australia’s food supply chain – Australian farmers, Australian food processors, small to medium size food retailers and, most importantly, we who eat the products of these enterprises”, explained Mr Rose. “Fair food that the farmer has been paid properly for and that is sold through a retail system that is not dominated by the supermarket duopoly that controls 80 percent of Australia’s grocery sales, but that is sold through a truly free market that includes thriving small to medium food businesses to give us – Australia’s eaters – authentic true choice in what we buy and where we but it. It’s good, healthy and tasty food that all Australians have access to irrespective of their income and where they live. This includes Australians living with disability, illness, those living on a government allowance, such as pensioners,  and those in remote indigenous communities… the more then five percent of our people who presently live with an insecure and unhealthy food supply”.

Fair Food Week will highlight the fresh, innovative ideas found in the Australian Food Sovereignty Alliance’s Peoples’ Food Plan, Australia’s first crowdsourced policy directions document and the result of democratic, consultative forums held across the country.

>>> Australia’s First Fair Food Week will be held 19-25 August 2013.
>>> You can learn more about Fair Food Week events or add your own on their website.


Open Table: The first success!

Posted in Movements by Kate Archdeacon on June 27th, 2013

OpenTable2
Photo from Open Table.

On the first Sunday of every month at the Brunswick Neighbourhood House, De Carle St, Open Table welcomes friends, families, neighbours and anyone up for a free Sunday feast, and Sunday June 2nd was the first official event. The night was a great success, with around 60 people contributing to the great atmosphere of the evening.  Families, elderly locals, residents from nearby community housing, people from community organisations, and other interested locals mingled, sharing food prepared by Open Table’s chef from donations from food rescue organisations and local gardeners.  Event collaborator Georgia Hutchison says that “everyone was beaming”.

The next event will be held on July 7, and the organisers will be continuing to develop connections with local community organisations in the month until then, ensuring the invitation to come and share in a Sunday feast is spread as widely as possible.  The organisers are also planning a special feast during Fair Food Week to coincide with the launch of the People’s Food Plan.

>>> Stay updated through their website or facebook page.

 

About Open Table:

Australians discard $8 billion of edible food every year in our homes, this is roughly 350kg of food per year in the bin (Source: NSW EPA, 2012). Sadly, this does not even take into account edible food wasted in production, distribution and point of sale. Food that goes to landfill doesn’t biodegrade like it does in your compost – as it rots it releases methane and other greenhouse gases.

Open Table is a not-for-profit food redistribution and community connectedness project. They hold monthly Sunday dinners at the Brunswick Neighbourhood house, using excess food that would otherwise go to waste. The dinners are inclusive, accessible and free. This project addresses the need for greater community connectedness and participation, as well as providing for the material needs of more disadvantaged members of the community. Open Table seeks to bring together disparate groups within Brunswick to greater links and understanding.

Open Table is based on collaboration within: our working group, the Brunswick community, local businesses and supporting organisations. Through the generosity of the Brunswick Neighbourhood house they have a permanent home for the monthly dinners. With support and guidance from Moreland City Council they are able to use the community kitchen to cook delicious vegetarian meals.


Dehydrator in Degraves Street

Posted in Models by Kate Archdeacon on June 24th, 2013

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Photo by avlxyz via Flickr CC

From Enterprise Melbourne:

The City of Melbourne is working with businesses in Degraves Street and Centre Place to implement a shared recycling program, which aims to divert plastics, paper, cardboard, aluminum, glass and organic waste from commercial bins. The waste materials are collected from the businesses and processed on site at the Degraves Street Recycling Facility in Ross House, which hosts a food waste dehydrator, a cardboard baler and co-mingled recycling bins. [The dehydrator turns organic waste into pellets that can then be used as compost for gardens. -JB] The objective of the project is to increase recycling and promote positive environmental outcomes within the Degraves Street precinct.  The project will reduce the environmental and amenity impacts of waste collection and disposal in this busy and popular area of the city. The Degraves Street Recycling Facility is a demonstration project jointly funded by the City of Melbourne and Metropolitan Waste Management Group.

>>> The Degraves Street Recycling Facility is located in Ross House.
>>> You can read the original article on Enterprise Melbourne.


Food-Security and Water-Security in the Urban Context

Posted in Research, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on June 20th, 2013

 

Image: CRC for Water-Sensitive Cities

Image: CRC for Water-Sensitive Cities

From The urban water-energy-food nexus by Prof. Tony Wong:

[…]

Australia’s water consumption is dominated by agricultural uses, followed by consumptions in cities (domestic and industrial) and for electricity generation principally to meet demands in our cities. Our communities have an important role in managing demands. Our consumption of food, energy and water remains inefficient. We waste more than 30% of food produced, we are only beginning to recycle our wastewater for non-drinking purposes, and we do not capture and use the ‘waste heat’ from our electricity production. Transforming our cities to a more sustainable and efficient consumption of resources require socio-technical approaches, starting with a concerted effort to foster community awareness and behavioural change for efficient consumption of water, energy and food. Exploiting the water-energy nexus in urban development, such as district-level tri-generation and the further utilisation of available heat for water disinfection and production of district-level reticulation of hot water, are simple cathartic initiatives to lead this transformation.

The creation of productive landscapes is emerging as a core element of urban green infrastructure strategies. Our cities are water supply catchments with the combined stormwater and wastewater resources exceeding the water consumption in most Australian cities. These resources may be exploited to support a greener city for a multitude of liveability objectives, including the support of productive landscapes ranging from community gardens, to orchards and urban forests.

>> Read the full article by Prof. Tony Wong on the CRC for Water-Sensitive Cities website.


Twisted Tucker: Sustainable Table

Posted in Events by Riki Edelsten on June 13th, 2013

23 June , 2013
11:45 amto4:00 pm

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On Sunday 23rd June Sustainable Table are hosting a unique and inspiring event that will teach us all how to grow and cook with Australian native plants. The event will explore why native edibles are an important part of the sustainable food movement.

Warm yourself with bush tea and wattleseed cookies and take a guided educational talk and tour of the CERES native gardens and nursery. You’ll learn about the environmental and health benefits of growing native edibles and get a run-down of what to grow and how to grow it so that you can enjoy our native cuisine in your own home.

Then enjoy an aperitif and canapés before indulging in a native two-course Sunday roast lunch – think wild bush spices, succulent wallaby and nourishing native greens.

Founder of ‘Outback Chef’ Jude Mayall will demonstrate how to cook with native foods. You’ll also learn how to mix fun and creative drinks using native botanicals and hear from the makers, growers and change makers.

You might like to read an interview with Jude on why we should eat native foods here.

Lunch will be served at The Merri Table, prepared by chef Kiran Kilmartin, and matched with Australian-made, botanically-enriched Maidenii Vermouth and West Winds Gin.

Tickets normally cost $110 but for a limited time only you can recieve a 10% discount on bookings of 4 people or more.
What the ticket price includes:

Ticket price includes a native edibles tour and talk, cooking demonstration, canapes, two-course seasonal lunch,  alcoholic drinks as well as a take-home native seedling and guide.
WHEN: 11.45am – 4.00pm, Sunday 23 June

WHERE: The Merri Table, CERES, Cnr Roberts and Stewarts Streets, East Brunswick. For transport options (Bus, Tram, Bike, Car parking) click here.

Buy your ticket online here.

We hope to see you there!


Living Green Workshops at CERES

Posted in Models by Kate Archdeacon on June 5th, 2013

Have a look at this screen grab of some of the workshops coming up at CERES – they just get better and better.
What are you doing on the weekend?

CERES Workshops

>>www.ceres.org.au/Training/workshop.html 
>> download the March-June 2013 brochure 


March Against Monsanto: Melbourne

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on May 23rd, 2013

25 May , 2013
2:00 pmto4:00 pm

March Against Monsanto

This event is for the fight for our food!! We deserve to know what we are eating. Food sovereignty and food security starts with us. Biotech companies are slowly killing the world with their patented seeds, domination of the distribution of food and deadly DNA interrupting chemicals, which we ingest everyday.

The day commences at 2pm, we have expert guest speakers, acoustic entertainment, a seed swap/giveaway and public discussion forum…it’s going to be huge!

STATE LIBRARY of VICTORIA at 2PM
328 Swanston Street Melbourne

>> March Against Monsanto global site

>> Melbourne’s March Against Monsanto facebook site


Compost Revolution: Online Quiz and Tutorial

Posted in Models by Kate Archdeacon on May 20th, 2013

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Image: Compost Revolution

The Mount Alexander Shire Council has signed up for a Compost Revolution – your ‘one-stop-shop for composting and wormfarming':

“Composting and wormfarming is easy to do and prevents the wasteful transport of food scraps to landfill where they produce harmful greenhouse gases. You can halve your rubbish and return vital nutrients to the soil to grow your veggies in. You can learn all the basics of composting and wormfaring at our online tutorial, then take the quiz.

After that [if you live in Mt Alexander] you’re eligible for a discounted compost bin or worm farm!

The Compost Revolution is a community initiative that promotes home composting, growing food locally and connecting with your neighbours. Get involved, learn, test yourself and start turning food scraps into healthy soil for growing food.”

>> compostrevolution.com.au/mountalexander/