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Posts Tagged ‘food waste’

Open Table: The first success!

Posted in Movements by Kate Archdeacon on June 27th, 2013

OpenTable2
Photo from Open Table.

On the first Sunday of every month at the Brunswick Neighbourhood House, De Carle St, Open Table welcomes friends, families, neighbours and anyone up for a free Sunday feast, and Sunday June 2nd was the first official event. The night was a great success, with around 60 people contributing to the great atmosphere of the evening.  Families, elderly locals, residents from nearby community housing, people from community organisations, and other interested locals mingled, sharing food prepared by Open Table’s chef from donations from food rescue organisations and local gardeners.  Event collaborator Georgia Hutchison says that “everyone was beaming”.

The next event will be held on July 7, and the organisers will be continuing to develop connections with local community organisations in the month until then, ensuring the invitation to come and share in a Sunday feast is spread as widely as possible.  The organisers are also planning a special feast during Fair Food Week to coincide with the launch of the People’s Food Plan.

>>> Stay updated through their website or facebook page.

 

About Open Table:

Australians discard $8 billion of edible food every year in our homes, this is roughly 350kg of food per year in the bin (Source: NSW EPA, 2012). Sadly, this does not even take into account edible food wasted in production, distribution and point of sale. Food that goes to landfill doesn’t biodegrade like it does in your compost – as it rots it releases methane and other greenhouse gases.

Open Table is a not-for-profit food redistribution and community connectedness project. They hold monthly Sunday dinners at the Brunswick Neighbourhood house, using excess food that would otherwise go to waste. The dinners are inclusive, accessible and free. This project addresses the need for greater community connectedness and participation, as well as providing for the material needs of more disadvantaged members of the community. Open Table seeks to bring together disparate groups within Brunswick to greater links and understanding.

Open Table is based on collaboration within: our working group, the Brunswick community, local businesses and supporting organisations. Through the generosity of the Brunswick Neighbourhood house they have a permanent home for the monthly dinners. With support and guidance from Moreland City Council they are able to use the community kitchen to cook delicious vegetarian meals.


The Brotherhood of Saint Laurence Wholesale Food Security Community Enterprise

Posted in Models, RDAG by Virginia on April 15th, 2009

The Brotherhood of Saint Laurence (BSL) is an independent organisation with strong Anglican and community links that was established during the Great Depression to end social injustice and fight for an Australia free of poverty.

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The Brotherhood’s mission is to deliver services, develop policy and support social change to help empower people, build community capacity as part of the community by creating and developing enterprise projects and ventures as catalysts for individual and community transformation.

BSL is currently conducting a feasibility study as part of its Community Enterprise Development Initiative into establishing a Wholesale Food Security Community Enterprise (also called “Food PAD”) to source produce for redistribution for local community organizations. This project aims to support the development of food related community enterprises to address issues of food insecurity and provide a pathway for social engagement and skill building while benefiting the environment.

The project intends on establishing and facilitating new sets of relationships between producers and consumers, placing the focus foremost on community benefits, whilst supporting the creation of sustainable new community initiatives. BSL, the Victorian Government and other stakeholders will provide the catalyst for the project while the impetus and ownership of the community enterprise will rest with community organizations. BSL is also supporting the development of two other food projects, the Western and Northern Metro Distribution Systems, in addition to the Food PAD project.

For more information about this project visit www.bsl.org.au or www.communityenterprise.org.au.

This is from “Social Innovations in Victorian Food Systems” case studies by Ferne Edwards.


Lincoln Smith, Sustainable Cities Round Table, Sustainable Sharing, Thursday 26th February 2009

Posted in SCRT Videos, Sustainable Cities Round Tables by Virginia on March 24th, 2009

Lincoln Smith, Founder of Growlocal, seeks to localise food production by sharing food.  He seeks to add passion, culture and connectivity from individuals to formulate a model that will increase the sustainability of food produce. GrowLocal is an online food swapping websit that reduces food waste.


Food Waste Workshop Outcomes 4, Sustainable Cities Round Tables, 24 September 2008

Posted in Sustainable Cities Round Tables by Ferne Edwards on October 27th, 2008

A Food Waste Workshop was held at the Sustainable Cities Round Table – Waste Not Want Not, 24 September 2008. Three key organisations redistribute food that is still edible to people in need: SecondBite, FareShare (previously One Umbrella) and VicRelief Foodbank. Participants at the Sustainable Cities Round Table received a five minute explanation of the key issues of the growing food waste issue that links to poverty, hunger and urban environmental issues, and then worked together in small teams to answer the following four questions.

1. Can you think of ways to help better manage these issues of food waste redistribution
2. Can you think of opportunities that could occur across the city system? ie. in terms of transport, water, urban planning, etc
3. Can you think of ways to reduce the amount of food that is generated further up the chain
4. Can you think of new opportunities or businesses that could emerge from the topics mentioned above?

The responses from the fourth question are listed below.

Key issues:
1. Awareness – that food rescue agencies exist and have the capacity to collect surplus food, so we can start making a dint on the amount of good quality nutritious food that goes to waste.
2. Funding – the cost to run our organisation is increasing, and will continue to do so. This is of vital importance as we begin to tackle to problem on a much larger scale. Collaboration, information sharing and pooling of resources will be key in addressing this.
3. Logistics – Not so much a problem but an area that will need a lot of focus (money!) and collaboration as we implement statewide strategies, incorporating multiple agencies and both internal and external logistics companies.

4. Can you think of new opportunities or businesses that could emerge from the topics mentioned above?
Start producing organic varieties so as to encourage people to go for healthy food instead of junk food
Set up brown fields with in house treatment of various types of waste and set up a centralized distribution network for recycled products
Opening as business/restaurant, sourcing form “dumpster”
Council compost business
More urban garden spaces

Read the rest of this entry »


Food Waste Workshop Outcomes 3, Sustainable Cities Round Tables, 24 September 2008

Posted in Sustainable Cities Round Tables by Ferne Edwards on October 27th, 2008

A Food Waste Workshop was held at the Sustainable Cities Round Table – Waste Not Want Not, 24 September 2008. Three key organisations redistribute food that is still edible to people in need: SecondBite, FareShare (previously One Umbrella) and VicRelief Foodbank. Participants at the Sustainable Cities Round Table received a five minute explanation of the key issues of the growing food waste issue that links to poverty, hunger and urban environmental issues, and then worked together in small teams to answer the following four questions.

1. Can you think of ways to help better manage these issues of food waste redistribution
2. Can you think of opportunities that could occur across the city system? ie. in terms of transport, water, urban planning, etc
3. Can you think of ways to reduce the amount of food that is generated further up the chain
4. Can you think of new opportunities or businesses that could emerge from the topics mentioned above?

The responses from the third question are listed below.

Key issues:
1. Awareness – that food rescue agencies exist and have the capacity to collect surplus food, so we can start making a dint on the amount of good quality nutritious food that goes to waste.
2. Funding – the cost to run our organisation is increasing, and will continue to do so. This is of vital importance as we begin to tackle to problem on a much larger scale. Collaboration, information sharing and pooling of resources will be key in addressing this.
3. Logistics – Not so much a problem but an area that will need a lot of focus (money!) and collaboration as we implement statewide strategies, incorporating multiple agencies and both internal and external logistics companies.

3. Can you think of ways to reduce the amount of food that is generated further up the chain?
Impart training to restaurants/chefs etc. to design/devise energy efficient recipes which can be easily adapted even in households
Change farmer contract –overproduction of crops
Eating seasonally
Restaurants (less over supplying, reduced portion, better storage)
Cultural change (what people think is acceptable to buy ie. blemishes on fruit/veg)

Read the rest of this entry »


Food Waste Workshop Outcomes 2, Sustainable Cities Round Tables, 24 September 2008

Posted in Sustainable Cities Round Tables by Ferne Edwards on October 27th, 2008

A Food Waste Workshop was held at the Sustainable Cities Round Table – Waste Not Want Not, 24 September 2008. Three key organisations redistribute food that is still edible to people in need: SecondBite, FareShare (previously One Umbrella) and VicRelief Foodbank. Participants at the Sustainable Cities Round Table received a five minute explanation of the key issues of the growing food waste issue that links to poverty, hunger and urban environmental issues, and then worked together in small teams to answer the following four questions.

1. Can you think of ways to help better manage these issues of food waste redistribution
2. Can you think of opportunities that could occur across the city system? ie. in terms of transport, water, urban planning, etc
3. Can you think of ways to reduce the amount of food that is generated further up the chain
4. Can you think of new opportunities or businesses that could emerge from the topics mentioned above?

The responses from the second question are listed below.

Key issues:
1. Awareness – that food rescue agencies exist and have the capacity to collect surplus food, so we can start making a dint on the amount of good quality nutritious food that goes to waste.
2. Funding – the cost to run our organisation is increasing, and will continue to do so. This is of vital importance as we begin to tackle to problem on a much larger scale. Collaboration, information sharing and pooling of resources will be key in addressing this.
3. Logistics – Not so much a problem but an area that will need a lot of focus (money!) and collaboration as we implement statewide strategies, incorporating multiple agencies and both internal and external logistics companies.

2. Can you think of opportunities that could occur across the city system? Ie. in terms of transport, water, urban planning, etc.
    Edible landscape – trees with edible fruits and parks
    Community gardens
    Grow your own
    Information systems about where excess food is to cut down the length and time of transport (something similar to the op shop blog)

Read the rest of this entry »


Food Waste Workshop Outcomes 1, Sustainable Cities Round Tables, 24 September 2008

Posted in Sustainable Cities Round Tables by Ferne Edwards on October 27th, 2008

A Food Waste Workshop was held at the Sustainable Cities Round Table – Waste Not Want Not, 24 September 2008. Three key organisations redistribute food that is still edible to people in need: SecondBite, FareShare (previously One Umbrella) and VicRelief Foodbank. Participants at the Sustainable Cities Round Table received a five minute explanation of the key issues of the growing food waste issue that links to poverty, hunger and urban environmental issues, and then worked together in small teams to answer the following four questions.

1. Can you think of ways to help better manage these issues of food waste redistribution
2. Can you think of opportunities that could occur across the city system? ie. in terms of transport, water, urban planning, etc
3. Can you think of ways to reduce the amount of food that is generated further up the chain
4. Can you think of new opportunities or businesses that could emerge from the topics mentioned above?

The responses from the first question are listed below.

Key issues:
1. Awareness – that food rescue agencies exist and have the capacity to collect surplus food, so we can start making a dint on the amount of good quality nutritious food that goes to waste.
2. Funding – the cost to run our organisation is increasing, and will continue to do so. This is of vital importance as we begin to tackle to problem on a much larger scale. Collaboration, information sharing and pooling of resources will be key in addressing this.
3. Logistics – Not so much a problem but an area that will need a lot of focus (money!) and collaboration as we implement statewide strategies, incorporating multiple agencies and both internal and external logistics companies.

1. Can you think of ways to help better manage these issues of food waste redistribution?
Bring the people to the food
Community kitchens for both rich and poor, ie. all sections of societies
Target big users, ie. colleges

Read the rest of this entry »


Stop Food Waste campaign!

Posted in Events by Ferne Edwards on September 3rd, 2008

Please find a post below from the Notebook editor, Caroline Roessler, who is spearheading the Stop Food Waste campaign.

Food waste in this country is an environmental and financial disaster. In an economic climate of rising fuel costs and interest rates, not to mention disastrous food shortages in the Third World and the enormous environmental implications, throwing away good food seems like utter madness. When you consider that we are throwing away at least one out of five bags of groceries every time we go shopping, we might as well throw away the money it was bought with– over $5 billion annually in Australia. Furthermore, when food rots in landfill, it produces methane, a greenhouse gas 23 times more potent than the carbon dioxide pouring from your cars exhaust. If we dont acknowledge and mend our wasteful habits, we will destroy an environment that can sustain and support future generations.

It is for this reason that Notebook: magazine has teamed up with Planet Ark founder, Jon Dee, to launch the Stop Food Waste! campaign in our September issue. Our objective is to serve up the practicalities of dealing with an issue that has global and personal, financial implications. We are also inviting Australians to share their creative solutions for minimizing the amount of food that is thrown in the rubbish bin. Do you have any ideas? Please post them on www.notebookmagazine.com/stopfoodwaste

Caroline Roessler
(Editor of Notebook Magazine)


Kevin Huang speaks about BinIt! at the Sustainable Cities Round Table

Posted in SCRT Videos, Sustainable Cities Round Tables by Ferne Edwards on September 2nd, 2008

Kevin Huang is a student at Monash University who has designed “BinIt! – A Compostable Bin“. Kevins design offers a sleek product that encourages people to compost their food waste at home. His presentation provided a useful example of the different stages of sustainable entrepreneurship, talking about his experiences in designing a new product which has yet to fully commercialised. Kevin’s project is an outcome of the VEIL project, a collaboration between design academics and their students to realise sustainable outcomes in universities across Victoria. You can read more about Kevin’s “BinIt” at his website: http://www.k-huang.com/. Please view Kevin’s presentation below.