Posts Tagged ‘environment’

Premier’s Sustainability Award Winners 2013

Posted in Models, Movements by Jessica Bird on October 28th, 2013

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From the media release ‘Moonee Valley City Council and Wingate Avenue Community Centre win Premier’s top sustainability award‘:

A project by Moonee Valley City Council and Wingate Avenue Community Centre has won the top Premier’s Recognition Award in the Premier’s Sustainability Awards 2013 for introducing recycling to a community housing estate. The Ascot Vale Housing Estate Household Recycling project defied previous failed attempts to introduce recycling and established a successful, ground-breaking model using targeted and broad-ranging community engagement of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) and lower Socio Economic Status (SES) groups.

The project won the Community category of the awards and then went on to win the night’s overall award. […]

Sustainability Victoria CEO, Stan Krpan, congratulated the Moonee Valley City Council and Wingate Avenue Community Centre project team for their innovative work which delivered recycling to estate’s residents, of whom 55 per cent were born overseas. “A key initiative of this project was the focus on engaging residents from many cultural backgrounds with varying competency in English, in the importance of recycling,” he said. In its first six months, 52 tonnes of recyclables were recovered. Three of the 11 residents who worked on the project secured jobs as a result of their experience.

Now in their eleventh year, the Premier’s Sustainability Awards celebrate efficient use of water, resources and energy, better waste management and recycling practices, the enhancement of the environment and effective, practical community action. The full list of winners of the Premier’s Sustainability Awards 2013 are:

The Premier’s Recognition Award – Moonee Valley City Council and Wingate Avenue Community Centre, taking recycling to public housing residents
The Premier’s Regional Recognition Award – Victoria Carpets, for their work in energy and emissions reduction in their Bendigo plant
Innovative Products or Services Award – ModWood Technologies for development of Flame Shield®, a wood-plastic composite for building in bushfire areas
Infrastructure and Buildings Award – RMIT University for their Swanston Academic Building: a progressive tertiary learning environment
Environmental Protection Award – Mallee Catchment Management Authority’s project: Restoring the balance in the drought-riven Hattah Lakes
Education Award – Bentleigh Secondary College – a world recognised, very sustainable school
Small and Medium Enterprises Award – Rae-Line for embedding sustainability practices in manufacturing soft trim components for trucks
Large Business Award – Victoria Carpets
Community Award – Moonee Valley City Council and Wingate Avenue Community Centre.

>>> For more information on the winners and finalist entries visit the Premier’s Sustainability Awards website.


Mullum Mullum Festival AGM and Lecture

Posted in Events by Jessica Bird on October 9th, 2013

12 October , 2013
4:00 pmto6:00 pm

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Notice of Annual General Meeting for the Mullum Mullum Festival.

Plans for the 2014 festival will be discussed. The meeting will be held at 5pm this Saturday 12 October, 2013, Yarran Dheran Information Centre, Mitcham. Mel 49 B6.

The Meeting will be preceded by a presentation by Paul Mahony titled ‘Omissions of emissions: Our environment, livestock and the climate crisis’ between 4pm-5pm.

>> For more information, please see the Mullum Mullum Festival website.


2013 Mullum Mullum Festival

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on April 12th, 2013

20 April , 2013
21 April , 2013
27 April , 2013
28 April , 2013

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The annual Mullum Mullum Festival celebrates the ecological and cultural values of Mullum Mullum Creek Valley.

The catchment of the Mullum Mullum Creek in the municipalities of Maroondah, Whitehorse and Manningham is home to more than 60,000 people, but it also encompasses some of the largest and best preserved areas of remnant bush in urban Melbourne. This bush contains more than 300 species of indigenous flowering plants and more than 120 species of indigenous birds, as well as many mammals and reptiles, and countless insects.

The Festival was inaugurated in 1995 by concerned individuals in the local community who opposed the Eastern Freeway extension through the valley and who wanted to play an active role in promoting the natural values of the local area. During the Festival you will have the opportunity to learn about the biodiversity of the Mullum Mullum Valley, as well as the cultural heritage of the area.

The walks organised for this Festival cover a wide range of aspects of the valley; there is always something new to see.

The Mullum Mullum Valley supports valuable habitat for a range of indigenous flora and fauna and forms an important connection, linking the foothill forests of Maroondah to the Yarra river in Templestowe. The continued preservation and enhancement of this corridor is vital for the survival of the plants and animals that depend on it, and for ensuring that future generations retain an environment to enjoy. We hope that you will come away from the Mullum Mullum Festivals with greater understanding and knowledge of this beautiful native bushland and the flora and fauna within.

The 2013 festival will be on 20, 21 (opening day) 27 and 28 April.

>> mullummullumfestival.org.au

>> Download the 2013 Mullum Mullum Festival Brochure


EcoXpo Melbourne 19-21 April 2013

Posted in Events by aymeric on April 9th, 2013

19 April , 2013 10:00 amto21 April , 2013 6:00 pm

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Sustainable products on Australian supermarket shelves have more than doubled in the past year. Buying sustainable products means creating a positive impact through the complete life cycle of the product: from the moment the materials are extracted to make the product, to the way these are shipped are assembled, right down to the final packaging, and life after disposal.

Eco living means we care about our impact on our environment. The most effective way to buy eco and sustainable products is to buy those which have been certified for their sustainability credentials.
EcoXpo Melbourne, a three-day sustainability expo to be held from the 19th to the 21st of April 2013 at the Royal Melbourne Showgrounds, goes through a rigorous screening process to ensure that only such products and services are showcased.

Over 150 of Australia’s best eco-friendly exhibitors will be showcasing their wares. There are 9 pavilions at EcoXpo: eco baby, organic food & wines, health, beauty, sustainable fashion, eco building materials, eco gardens, sustainable transport and environmental protection. There will be a range of mouth-watering organic food and wine stalls available to tuck into. Engaging eco living workshops will be held throughout the EcoXpo weekend on sustainable food, recycling, environmental conservation, gardening, eco baby, green living, well-being and much more! There will also be a kids’ zone to keep the little ones entertained.

We encourage green business involved with anything green & eco to be part of EcoXpo: Melbourne (19-21 April 2013), Sydney with Dr. David Suzuki (20-22 September 2013) and Perth (17-20 October 2013).
Place: Melbourne Showground, located just 10 minutes from Melbourne’s CBD
Opening Times: 10am – 6:00pm

>>> For more information and discount tickets see the EcoXpo website and follow EcoXpo on Facebook.


Potential Urban Orchards: City of Melbourne’s Urban Forest Consultations

Posted in Events, Seeking by Kate Archdeacon on April 4th, 2013

6 April , 2013
10:00 amto11:00 am
20 April , 2013
10:00 amto11:00 am
4 May , 2013
10:00 amto11:00 am

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Photo: Roots to Fruit

If we want council to consider productive street trees in Melbourne, we need to ask for them – that was the message when some of the Urban Forest team participated in the EcoCity Food Forum a couple of weeks ago, and it was also clear that they are really keen to get diverse and plentiful public feedback on the Urban Forest Strategy.  There are three more workshops left to run in the consultation process.  Feedback can also be posted directly to the Urban Forest website.

From the Urban Forest Conversation website:

We invite you to share your thoughts and opinions about the development of the City of Melbourne’s Urban Forest.

The City’s Urban Forest Strategy provides a robust framework for the evolution and longevity of our urban forest but what will that look like at an individual street level? Join the conversation to influence the plan for your neighbourhood’s trees. In 2013, we are developing the plans for the urban forest in Carlton, East Melbourne, South Yarra and the CBD.

Join the conversation online through this forum, post your comments on our urban forest map or participate in a workshop to influence the plans for your neighbourhood’s trees. You can register for a workshop via the key links on the right hand side of the Urban Forest page.

Register for Upcoming Workshops:

 

Food for thought? Some thoughts on productive trees in public space:

“Edible Street Verge Gardening is something that has been going on for the past 20 years or so in our cities but is now capturing the public imagination such that the number of plantings is rapidly increasing.  For advocates of edible landscaping in our cities, this is good news but for local government the practice can be confusing. What has become apparent during the recent upsurge in the popularity of edible footpath planting is that a set of design and planting guidelines are desperately needed.  Most verge plantings to date have been created by gardeners who know what they are doing. The possibility emerging from the current boost in popularity is that those less knowledgeable will create gardens with inappropriate plants and without considering other footpath users.”

“The biggest objections to planting food-bearing plants in public spaces have always been, and will likely continue to be, maintenance and aesthetics.  Public officials are quick to point out that edibles are messy and difficult to maintain, precluding their use in the urban environment. … These concerns are often based largely on misconception and subjectivity.  still, many of these concerns can be addressed with an understanding that maintenance and aesthetics can be balanced by choosing certain plants over others, mixing edibles with ornamentals, utilizing existing maintenance staff and methods, and properly gauging community demand for fresh, local produce.”

“The City of Yarra recognises the importance of urban agriculture in supporting community sustainability, especially in times of changing climate and the myriad of associated issues such as food security due to diminishing oil supplies. Neighbourhood gardening using productive trees1 is recognised by Council as a form of Urban Agriculture that can be used by local communities to create sustainable, resilient and liveable neighbourhoods in an effective and meaningful way. Planting productive trees is considered by Council to be an effective, means of inspiring and enabling community food production in the City of Yarra by generating environmental, social and economic wellbeing from the ground up – created for and by local people. Planting productive trees can be initiated, operated and maintained by the local community with support from Council. Council’s Guidelines and registration process will assist in making neighbourhood gardening with productive trees effective, enjoyable and safe for all.”

“We’ve all seen trees over laden with fruit that the trees owner isn’t eating. Generally the tree is in somebody’s garden where it can’t be reached from the street, and in these days of lost community and increasing crime it’s kind of hard to randomly approach people for fruits. There must be a way that more community food can be grown. There are many families where the kids don’t get enough nutrition, especially in the form of fruit, where dinner is straight from the freezer into the microwave. Yuck! I know of two parks where fruit is grown for the public to eat. One is Gourley Park in East Freo, the other is King William Park in South Freo. There must be scope for more. I know some people are concerned about fruit fly (and others who unfortunately aren’t concerned enough), but not all fruit attracts those rotten pests. It’s already common to see tasty loquats ignored in gardens , so we don’t need to add to the burden of fruit fly. There’s plenty of other varieties to choose from and if it was well known that the fruit was available and folk were educated about when to pick it there wouldn’t be lots of rotten fruit around to attract nasties. […]

Free fruit could be the only fruit so what can be grown that wouldn’t cause problems? Some nuts would be a good start. Almonds are good and grow well around here. Macadamias do well in some areas around Perth. They’ll also feed black cockatoos. Bunya pine nuts are pretty good, but need cordoning off in autumn (as they do in Hyde Park, Perth) because people have been killed when the huge cones of seeds drop on their head! Not a tree to sit under at the best of times with their wickedly spiny leaves, but much more useful that its oft’ planted relative the Norfolk Island pine!! Many kinds of citrus would be suitable with the right care. […] There’s a fantastic tree called Ziziphus jujuba, commonly called Chinese date, which grows numerous little apple like fruit about the size of olives. They are a tough species which provide a common meeting place in some desert countries, providing shade and food that can be eaten fresh or preserved for later use. Olives are good public trees with very useful fruit (though obviously not good for hand to mouth browsing). There are a few bush tucker foods that could be grown too, such as muntries/muntari (Kunzea pomifera), a creeping member of the Myrtaceae family, which has pretty white flowers followed by tasty little apple like berries. It grows on the east coast and is often sold in Perth. Quandongs are a native species which has deep red skins on pretty nuts. Some bush foods require some retraining of the taste buds, but they are generally pest and disease free, and don’t need help once established. Obviously somebody would need to be looking after these things, but if parks had more community input and a little council money to feed the trees a few times a year and have them drip irrigated they could become important meeting and snacking places. Parks could even be designed to be useful on purpose!!”

 

 


Parks Victoria’s Junior Rangers holiday program

Posted in Movements by John Myers on March 28th, 2013

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Kids who have an interest in nature, history, animals and the outdoors have the opportunity this Easter holiday (29 March – 14 April) to join a Park Ranger for fun activities. Parks Victoria is putting on its exciting Junior Ranger Program in many parks around Victoria throughout the school holidays including Serendip Sanctuary, Croajingolong National Park, Point Nepean National Park, Werribee Park, Wilsons Promontory National Park, State Coal Mine (Wonthaggi), Dandenong Ranges National Park and the National Rhododendron Gardens (Free Family Fun Day), Great Otway National Park, Mornington Peninsula National Park, Coolart Wetlands and River Red Gum Parks.

Ideal for kids aged 6-12, Parks Victoria’s Junior Rangers holiday program is all about having hands-on fun while learning more about the environment, Victoria’s history and how parks protect native animals and plants. If your child likes exploring forests and beaches with a Park Ranger, or even dressing up in period costume then a Junior Ranger activity is not to be missed. There will be a wealth of activities to choose from to ensure kids are entertained, challenged and inspired by a program that celebrates nature and the great outdoors.

Junior Rangers is all about celebrating nature and encouraging kids to discover more about the environment and the part that parks play in protecting animals, plants and Victoria’s history.

Led by a park ranger, children and their families will have the opportunity to go on a range of activities including:

  • Quarantine Me – Find out what it was like to be quarantined in the late 1800’s at Point Nepean Quarantine Station.
  • Bush Detective - Become a bush detective and help the park rangers track the secretive animals in the park.  Look for clues that the animals have left behind including tracks, skulls, scats and territorial markings.  Keep your eyes open for the furry culprits!
  • Rockpool Rambles - Join a park ranger to explore a hidden underwater world and discover the creatures that live on our rocky shores.
  • Play Games of the early 1900’s – Long before computers there were three-legged races, bocce, horse shoe throw, quoits, tunnel races, hoop’n’stick, fill the skip, sack races, hopscotch, skipping races and skittles.
  • Birdwatching - Learn how to use binoculars and get a close look at some of Victoria’s birds! Take a walk with the park ranger where you’ll learn ‘What bird is that? How do they fly? Where do they nest? What do they eat?’
  • Water Watch/Mini Beast Discovery – Have fun exploring the park with a park ranger and discover which little beasties make it their home.  Dip your nets into the water, see what critters you can find and what part they play in the world of wetlands.
  • Heritage Days - Celebrate our history by being part of it at Werribee Mansion. Experience the wringer and dolly in the laundry, are you as good as our laundry maid? Play old fashioned games on the lawn and find out who Aunt Sally is. Make some rope with our hand operated contraption and find out how to spin with a spinning wheel. You can chat to experts about our Victorian clothes and try your hand at writing with a slate pen
  • Craft – Get inspired by the plants and animals in the park and create some cool craft.
  • Dreamtime Discovery – Spend some time with an Indigenous park ranger. Be inspired by Dreamtime Stories and discover the connection Aboriginals have with Country.

Those taking part are reminded to bring a hat, sunscreen, sturdy footwear and a sense of adventure.

Most activities require a booking and children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian at all sessions. Junior Rangers is not a club; no membership is required to take part. Junior Ranger programs are run mostly during school holidays and on some weekends.

Keep an eye on the website for activities at individual parks.

www.juniorrangers.com.au


Life Beyond Single Use: eco-crafternoon

Posted in Events by TransitionTownPortPhillip on February 15th, 2013

23 February , 2013
12:00 pmto4:00 pm

Pre-loved PET pig

A local Sustainable Living Festival event, hosted by Transition Port Phillip.

Join us for an afternoon of creative workshops and transform waste into art. Learn how to make preloved PETs – upcycled clothing & jewellery – fused plastic flowers, purses & flags –  knit with plastic yarn (plarn)

Date: Saturday 23 February, 12-4pm.

Location: Port Phillip Eco Centre, 55a Blessington St, St Kilda

Bookings essential $5 earlybird (by 14 Feb) or $10 TryBooking.com

Transition Port Phillip is part of the Transition Town Network – our vision is to inspire and enhance connectedness and sustainable living.


Transitions Film Festival 2013

Posted in Events, Movements by Jessica Bird on February 14th, 2013

15 February , 2013 10:00 amto23 February , 2013 10:00 pm

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TRANSITIONS FILM FESTIVAL, 15 to 23 February 2013
“See the change you want to be in the world”

Featuring an amazing line-up of films including Matt Damon and Gus Van Sant’s feature narrative Promised Land, The Sundance Institute’s A Fierce Green Fire and the highly anticipated Chasing Ice, the Transitions Film Festival runs from February 15-23rd at Federation Square, ACMI and Cinema Nova. The program also features introductions and panel discussions with international filmmakers and Australia’s sustainability leaders. Key guests include Bob Brown (former leader of The Australian Greens), Drew Hutton (Lock The Gate), John Wiseman (Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute), Anna Rose (AYCC) and Velcrow Ripper via satellite (Director of Occupy Love).

Transitions Film Festival is dedicated to showcasing powerful, inspiring and ground-breaking films from around the world that highlight the awe-inspiring global transformations that are taking place every day. Covering topics such as social entrepreneurship, energy politics, climate change, social justice and technological innovation, the festival hopes to inspire the transition to a sustainable world. To encourage low emissions transport, audience members riding bikes to Cinema Nova screenings will receive cyclist’s concession prices.

Important Dates:
Federation Square Free Screenings: 15-16 February 2013
Cinema Nova Program: 17 -23 February 2013
ACMI Shorts: 18 February 2013

>>> For more information and to view the program visit the Transitions Film Festival website.


Sustainable Living Festival 2013

Posted in Events, Movements by Jessica Bird on February 7th, 2013

9 February , 2013to24 February , 2013
Source: Sustainable Living Festival 2013.

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Poster from the SLF 2013 wesbsite.

From “A guide to unpacking your festival program” by Festival Team 2013.

Australia’s largest sustainable living celebration is back with a jam-packed program with more than 300 events over two weeks across Victoria. This year’s diverse program includes delightfully different perspectives bound to challenge, engage and inspire action. As a guide to this ocean of events, we hope this blog post will help you navigate the program better.

Big Weekend: At the heart of the Festival, the Big Weekend program at Federation Square on 15 -17 Feb includes high quality food for thought in The Great Debate, influential thought leaders, such as Annie Leonard behind the widespread online animation The Story of Stuff, and a laughter guarantee at the Steaming Toad Variety Show with HG Nelson and Dan Ilic. By buying a ticket to these key Festival events, curated by the Festival’s operations team itself, you’re supporting the future of this non-profit Festival. Other event highlights of this year’s Big Weekend program we are really excited about bringing to you include Jason Roberts’ Better Block Keynote, The World’s Biggest Organic Feast hosted by ABC TV’s Costa Georgiadis, the Fix it! Workshop. While forums, talks and interactives like The Heat is On, Activating Community Energy, Playing God with the Planet, Green Inventors, The Gratitude Box and No Place like Homelands are sure to inspire and educate. Over the Big Weekend, Birrarung Marr and River Promenade are transformed into a bustling mini-village, complete with The Green Market and Bikefest Treadlie Market. In the weekend’s open community program stream, there’s a multitude of exhibitions, forums, kids activities, performances and workshops to discover.

Melbourne CBD: The second layer of the Festival takes place across Melbourne’s CBD, as the city comes to life with events throughout 9 – 24 Feb. This year, the Sustainable Living Festival, together with City of Melbourne and CrowdSpot, are launching My EcoCity Map, a collaborative online map for residents and visitors to capture and share sustainable projects, events, shops and organisations in the city. Check out the map and add you own favourite EcoCity spots! As part of the Festival’s film program, the Transition Film Festival kicks off on 15 Feb and runs til 24 Feb with solutions focused movies at several cinemas across town. Sign up to be part of the nationwide synchronised screening of Transition 2.0, a movie that tells an inspiring story of Transition Towns initiatives from around the world.

Statewide: In the second week of the statewide Festival program, the Festival’s first ever regional Victorian tour program – The Better Block Tour – heads out to regional locations (18 – 24 Feb) to help kickstart a revitalization of neighborhoods and communities across Victoria by inspiring, connecting and supporting local changemakers. Across the State of Victoria, there are a huge range of events taking place, feeding conversations and generating new ideas on how you can find and create your own ‘state of sustainability’!

>>> You can read the original post here.
>>> You can find out more about SLF 2013 on the website or via the festival program.


Coral: Rekindling Venus

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on October 3rd, 2012

15 October , 2012
7:30 pmto9:00 pm
9:30 pmto11:00 pm

Presented by Melbourne Festival and Museum Victoria

Lynette Wallworth (Australia)

CORAL: REKINDLING VENUS

WE LOOK TO THE NIGHT SKY FOR MYSTERIES OF INEFFABLE WONDER – BUT THE OCEANS CONTAIN A MAGIC JUST AS DEEP.

In November each year, on the night of the full moon, the hundreds of millions of coral beings that make up the Great Barrier Reef spawn in unison – a blinding, awe-inspiring whorl of colour and light. It is here that our greatest natural wonder stands in harmony with the Solar System, here that it stakes a claim to its continued existence.

Australian installation artist Lynette Wallworth has spent the last five years surveying the majesty of our coral reefs for Coral: Rekindling Venus, an immersive, kaleidoscopic journey through the glowing underwater forests of Australia, Papua New Guinea and Indonesia. Presented in the enveloping full dome of Melbourne’s Planetarium, Coral: Rekindling Venus takes us deep into a world that only a handful of humans have ever seen before – the infinitely complex, vibrant aquatic kingdoms of this planet’s coral reefs.

Featuring jaw-dropping cinematography from Emmy Award-winner David Hannan and a hypnotic, ethereal soundtrack featuring specially recorded songs from Antony (of Antony and the Johnsons), legendary film composer Max Richter and our very own Gurrumul, Coral: Rekindling Venus is a staggering cinematic experience and an ecological call-to-arms.

Mon 15 Oct at 7.30pm & 9.30pm

Melbourne Planetarium at Scienceworks
2 Booker Street, Spotswood

>> Bookings and more information here or visit the project website.

“Audible gasps filled the room, audience members clasped their hands to their chests and a few left the planetarium in tears… Wallworth offered audience members an opportunity to gain a personal connection to our oceans.”– Huffington Post

“We were all spellbound, gasping with joy… The journey is riddled with astronomical metaphor, occasional bursts of the familiar, and things recognisable only from science fiction.” – New Scientist