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Posts Tagged ‘discussion paper’

Future Housing in Melbourne – Discussion paper

Posted in Models, Seeking by Kate Archdeacon on July 2nd, 2013

Pages from future_living_discussion_paper

From the City of Melbourne website:

The City of Melbourne is growing quickly. By 2031, it is estimated that an additional 42,000 homes will be built within the municipality to house an additional 80,000 people. Our aspiration is for an inner and central city where housing is affordable, well-designed and meets the diverse needs of our residents. Our housing will play a critical role in realising our urban renewal areas as sustainable, liveable and welcoming places for future living.

Future Living opens a discussion on the role of the City of Melbourne and other key influencers, including the Australian and Victorian Governments, developers, investors and residents in meeting these goals.

>>> You can download the discussion paper from the City of Melbourne website.
>>> You can participate in the discussion and find out about the ‘Future Living’ pop up homes online.

Melbourne’s Metropolitan Strategy: Discussion paper open for contributions

Posted in Policies, Seeking by Kate Archdeacon on December 3rd, 2012

Photo by elizabethdonoghue via flickr CC

Information drawn from Urbis Think Tank and Plan Melbourne:

The Discussion Paper, “Melbourne – let’s talk about the future,” is part of the work currently underway in preparation for a new Metropolitan Strategy for Melbourne’s next 3 decades of growth and change.  The paper is intended to stimulate dialogue across the community, private sector and industry around a series of ideas and principles for the future of the city. A draft Metropolitan Plan will then be shaped from the current consultation around these principles, due for release in Autumn 2013.

The Government is calling for input on the proposed principles, which raise fundamental issues around the growth and structure of the city, including:

  • The structure and location of job clusters in the new economy;
  • Opportunities for strategic renewal in areas that are ripe for urban transformation;
  • Partnership opportunities to realise new ways of funding for urban infrastructure;
  • The potential for long term containment of the city by a permanent green belt.

The 9 principles are focused around three key themes:

  • “What most people value about Melbourne”, (principles 1 to 5) exploring ideas that could inform a future vision for Melbourne,
  • “What needs to change”, (principles 6 & 7), focusing on how Melbourne’s urban form should be managed at a metropolitan and local scale.
  • Implementation considerations (principles 8 & 9), focusing on leadership and partnerships.
Opportunities to comment through online forums or event attendance are currently open, with comments closing on March 1, 2013.
>> Read the Discussion Paper
>> Get Involved

National Urban Policy: Open for Public Comment

Posted in Policies, Seeking by Kate Archdeacon on December 17th, 2010

“Our Cities – building a productive, sustainable and liveable future” is open for comments and feedback. This discussion paper is accompanied by a Background and Research Paper “Our Cities – the challenge of change”Our Cities sets out the Australian Government’s thinking on a national approach to urban development and the challenges we must address for our cities to become more productive, sustainable and liveable.  The purpose of the discussion paper is to frame the Australian Government’s policy approach to cities as the basis for a National Urban Policy to be released in 2011. It will establish national directions and objectives for our cities as we prepare for the decades ahead.  The discussion paper outlines the Australian Government’s aspirations under the themes of productivity, sustainability and liveability, and recognises the importance of good planning and governance. It aims to stimulate a national discussion on the outcomes we need for our cities.

Your feedback will guide how we make our cities more productive, sustainable and liveable. Following consideration of your comments, the Australian Government will set out the policy and program actions that are needed to achieve what we want for our cities.  The Australian Government has prepared a list of 28 questions in the discussion paper. You can respond in two ways:

1. Download and fill out the Discussion Paper Feedback Survey, fill in your contact details and press the ‘submit’ button at the bottom of the form, or
2. Register your details and upload a written submission. This option will be available from Tuesday 4 January 2011 until the consultation period ends.

Open for Public Comment until 1 March 2011