Posts Tagged ‘discussion group’

Printing Australia’s Largest Solar Cells: Dr Scott Watkins, CSIRO

Posted in Events by Mark Ogge on August 30th, 2013

2 September , 2013
6:30 pmto8:00 pm
Image: CSIRO

Image: CSIRO

Dr Scott Watkins (Stream Leader, Organic Photovoltaics, Materials Science and Engineering at CSIRO), is developing next generation organic solar cells. He will talk about the new manufacturing facility in Melbourne printing solar cells at the size of an A3 sheet of paper, which are one of the largest in the world.

The Victorian Organic Solar Cell Consortium (VICOSC) has developed processes that use spray coating, reverse gravure and slot-dye coating as well as screen printing, and the technology that has gone from producing solar cells the size of a fingernail to 10cm square in three years. Dr Watkins says the new $200,000 printer has allowed the VICOSC team to jump to producing solar cells on sheets 30cm wide – right here in Melbourne!

The flexible, organic PV cells have applications in consumer devices and small integrated electronics, and into the future, they could be coated onto buildings, into windows and on roofs. Dr Watkins will join us to explain organic PV technology and how the printing process works.

Time: 6:30 – 8pm Monday 2 September 2013 

Fritz Loewe Theatre (entry via level 2)
McCoy Building
University of Melbourne
Cnr Elgin & Swanston Streets, Carlton

http://bze.org.au/events/discussion-group

Entry: Gold coin donation

Thank you to the University of Melbourne, Melbourne Energy Institute, our Zero Carbon Australia project partners for supporting us in bringing you this event.

 


May the force be with you – Service design for invisible connections

Posted in Events by emma.gerard on August 28th, 2013

29 August , 2013
6:00 pmto8:00 pm
Yodandy

Image from SDNM

From the Service Design Network Melbourne (SDNM) by Yoko Akama

The innocuous seeming arrows and lines in organisational charts and process diagrams often represent time, context, and connections that are essential to the experiences people have with those organisations. The problem is that arrows and connecting lines are so ubiquitous in diagrams that they seem invisible and are often overlooked.

It is much easier–and human nature—to focus effort on “things” because they represent tangible touchpoints, such as a website, ticket machine, and so on. As a result, many forget to attend to designing the experience of the arrows and lines—the transitions from one touchpoint to the next. They are too important to let just happen. Too important they are.

This talk with Dr. Andy Polaine and discussion explores how thinking about and designing the space and time between touchpoints can help bridge the silos within organisations that prevent engaging and positive service experiences from happening.

Dr. Andy Polaine has been involved in interaction design since the early 90s and was co-founder of the award-winning new media group, Antirom, in London. He was a creative producer at Razorfish, UK and later Interactive Director at Animal Logic, Sydney. Andy was Senior Lecturer and Head of the School of Media Arts at The University of New South Wales, Sydney before moving to Germany and holds a PhD from the University of Technology, Sydney in which he examined the relationship between play and interactivity. He now divides his time between being a Lecturer and Researcher in Service Design at the Lucerne School of Art and Design in Switzerland and his work as a service/interaction design consultant and writer, working with clients such as Telenor, VW Germany and live|work. He has written over 160 articles and papers and co-authored the Rosenfeld Media book, Service Design: From Insight to Implementation. He can be found online at polaine.com and on Twitter as @apolaine.

Time: August 29, 2013 from 6pm to 8pm
Location: Multipurpose Room (Level 1), RMIT Design Hub
Street: Victoria Street, corner of Swanston Street
City/Town: Melbourne
Event Type: talk
Organized By: Service Design Melbourne Network read more on their website


Transport Systems and Governance: Melbourne Emergence Monthly Meetup

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on July 31st, 2013

8 August , 2013
5:30 pmto7:00 pm
Image via sourceable.net

Image via sourceable.net

How can ideas from complex systems and multiple scales inform the governance and decision-making around transport systems and infrastructure?

The focus of this Emergence Meetup will be a follow-up to the previous month’s theme of urban planning and design, but this time applied to transport systems in particular.  We believe this is a timely theme given the current debate around several possible major transport infrastructure investments in Melbourne that may shape our region for decades to come.

  • Dr Russell Thompson will join us to give a talk on “Investigating sustainable transport in Melbourne using information portals”. This will provide illustrations of how we can discover how sustainable our local areas are using publicly available databases and analysis tools such as the VISTA portal, ABS Census and VicRoads CrashStats.
  • Tony Smith’s presentation will be focused on the western tunnel portal of the proposed East-West motorway, and consequent disruption of showcase areas of Royal Park West, significant Parkville West housing assets and ‘black comedic duplication of the lower Moonee Ponds Creek disaster zone’.

After presentations and discussion we expect to head to a nearby cafe/restaurant for those interested in a meal and further conversation.

Thursday, August 8, 2013, 5:30 PM
RMIT Room 56.06.87 (Building 56, Level 6, Room 87), cnr. Queensberry and Lygon St, Carlton South
Info and RSVP at: www.meetup.com/emergence-24


Do You Know What Your Home is Doing Right Now?

Posted in Events, Movements by Mark Ogge on March 1st, 2013

4 March , 2013
6:30 pmto8:00 pm

thermal-image

Do You Know What Your Home is Doing Right Now? – BZE Discussion Group 6.30pm Monday 4th March.

Thermal Imaging Secrets Revealed! As a volunteer with the Bayside Climate Change Action Group, Tim Forcey has conducted energy assessments on over 30 homes, many with a thermal imaging camera. Tim will reveal the many thermal secrets that our homes have been keeping from us – until now! Vermin in the roof, 42 degree bedroom walls at 11 AM, electrical equipment gone mad, the deep dark inner workings of heat pumps! Roll up, roll up!

Tim Forcey has been employed for over thirty years as a chemical engineer working at Exxon Mobil, BHP Billiton, Jemena, and the Australian Energy Market Operator. Tim was a major contributor to BZE’s Zero Carbon Australia (ZCA) 2020 Stationary Energy Plan and is currently working with the Buildings Plan team.

Time: 6:30 – 8pm Monday 4 March 2013

Fritz Loewe Theatre (entry via level 2)
McCoy Building
University of Melbourne
Cnr Elgin & Swanston Streets, Carlton

LIVE streaming of this event will be available for those that cannot attend in person.

>>> For more info on the discussion group see the Beyond Zero Emissions website.


BZE presents David Spratt: climate change and extreme weather

Posted in Events by Mark Ogge on January 31st, 2013

4 February , 2013
6:30 pmto8:00 pm

climate_code_red_cover_lr-774923

Monthly discussion group hosted by Beyond Zero Emissions focusing on energy solutions to climate change. Featuring David Spratt, co-author of the ground breaking Climate Code Red.

 

Time: 6:30- 8pm, Monday 4 February,  2013

Fritz Loewe Theatre (entry via level 2)
McCoy Building
University of Melbourne
Cnr Elgin & Swanston Streets, Carlton

Entry: Gold coin donation

Co-author of Climate Code Red, David Spratt will present the latest climate science and its links to increasing extreme weather events worldwide. Australia has experienced record high temperatures, heatwaves and bushfires already this year with the Bureau of Meteorology adding two new colours to its weather forecasting chart to take the highest temperature up from 50 to 54 degrees. In 2012 climate science observations saw a record summer Arctic sea ice melt, record Greenland ice sheet melt, record permafrost warming, as well as increasing floods, cyclones, droughts and heatwaves. With climate scientists predicting more extreme events, David also shows what we can expect at the 2 and 4 degree warming scenarios. David is also an experienced activist and will talk about the urgent action we can take to tackle the climate emergency.

Thank you to the University of Melbourne Energy Institute, our Zero Carbon Australia project partners for supporting us in bringing you this event.

For those outside Melbourne: LIVE streaming of this event in HD720 video is available.  For further reading follow the links to these articles: Climate Code Red,  Temperatures off the charts as Australia turns deep purpleThe 2013 climate change wake-up call,  Heat waves exacerbated by climate change.


Professor John Wiseman presents Post Carbon Pathways

Posted in Events by Mark Ogge on November 28th, 2012

3 December , 2012
6:30 pmto8:00 pm
Post Carbon Pathways: Learning from the most innovative and promising post carbon economy transition plans and strategies

Professor John Wiseman is Professorial Fellow, Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute (MSSI) at The University of Melbourne.

Professor Wiseman has recently returned to Australia following a period of travel meeting with and interviewing a wide range of leading researchers, policy makers and activists working on post carbon economy transition plans and strategies. This work is part of the broader Post Carbon Pathways project being undertaken with MSSI Research Fellow Taegen Edwards and Dr Kate Luckins. Professor Wiseman will share the key outcomes and learnings from this work.

The Post Carbon Pathways project aims to show that  transformational changes required to rapidly reduce greenhouse gas emissions depend on broad recognition that alternative, more desirable futures and pathways are indeed possible. Post Carbon Pathways project aims to strengthen understanding of the actions needed to create rapid, large-scale transitions to a just and sustainable post carbon future.

Time: 6:30- 8pm Monday 3 December 2012

Fritz Loewe Theatre (entry via level 2)
McCoy Building
University of Melbourne
Cnr Elgin & Swanston Streets, Carlton

Further reading:

http://www.sustainable.unimelb.edu.au/content/people/john_wiseman

http://www.postcarbonpathways.net.au/

Click Here for LIVE streaming of this event in HD720 video.


Concentrating Solar Thermal (CST) Power and Dispatchable Storage

Posted in Events, Research by Mark Ogge on November 7th, 2012

12 November , 2012
6:30 pmto8:00 pm

Dr Keith Lovegrove

Beyond Zero Emissions Discussion Group guest:

Dr Keith Lovegrove Senior Consultant – Solar Thermal at IT Power.

Dr Keith Lovegrove is a world leading expert in Concentrating Solar Thermal (CST) technology and has more than 20 years experience in leading solar thermal research – including 15 years teaching at the Australian National University (ANU) as head of the Solar Thermal Group.

Keith led the design and construction of the ANU Big Dish, the  largest concentrating solar dish in the world (at 500m2). He is a key contributor to the IEA Solar PACES program, which is an international cooperative network developing CST and chemical energy systems. Keith will present a CST and storage technology update from the latest Solar PACES conference (that he attended in September 2012), as well as research carried out on the potential of CSP in India.

Date/Time: 6:30- 8pm Monday 12 November 2012

Entry: gold coin donation

Fritz Loewe Theatre (entry via level 2)
McCoy Building
University of Melbourne
Cnr Elgin & Swanston Streets, Carlton

This event will also be streamed live online. Click here to view it.

For more information about our guest visit the discussion group page on the BZE website.


Zero Carbon Australia Buildings Plan

Posted in Events by Mark Ogge on September 28th, 2012

1 October , 2012
6:30 pmto8:00 pm

http://beyondzeroemissions.org/events/discussion-group

The Zero Carbon Australia (ZCA2020) Buildings Plan is set to launch in the coming months. The ZCA2020 Buildings Plan aims to demonstrate that there are no technical barriers to zero emission buildings in Australia. Project Director, Trent Hawkins, will take us through energy efficiency retrofits, thermal modelling software, implementation timelines, economic case studies, and the renewable energy strategies, that will make every building energy self-sufficient (i.e. zero net energy consumption) by the year 2020.

Whatever your incentive, energy efficient building design and sustainable performance is an absolute no-brainer. It would reduce Australia’s total carbon emissions. It would present energy savings for bill payers and more healthy and comfortable homes. This also has reciprocal benefits for government spending: a healthier population and more breathing room for the transition to renewable energy.

Time: 6:30- 8pm Monday 1 October 2012 

Fritz Loewe Theatre (entry via level 2)
McCoy Building
University of Melbourne
Cnr Elgin & Swanston Streets, Carlton

Plus LIVE webcast.

Trent is a Mechanical Engineer with a background in renewable energy and computational modelling. He previously held the position of Technical Manager at the sustainable energy consultancy, Enhar.

For participants outside Melbourne, live streaming of this event will be available here. You can ask questions and make comments during the webcast via a chatbox below. We will begin streaming the event at 6:25pm AEST (Australian Eastern Standard Time).

During live streaming we will provide a chatbox which can be signed into using various social media accounts like twitter and openID.

Thank you to the University of Melbourne, Melbourne Energy Institute and Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, our Zero Carbon Australia project partners, for joining us in bringing you this event.

Entry: Gold coin donation

Further reading:

http://beyondzeroemissions.org/buildings

http://beyondzeroemissions.org/media/newswire/queensland-awaits-new-bze-…


The New Resource Game in the Indo-Pacific

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on August 22nd, 2012

23 August , 2012
7:30 pmto8:30 pm

From the history the 17th Century Nutmeg Wars between the British and the Dutch in Indonesia, through the 19th century Opium Wars between the British, French and Chinese, and past the 20th century Oil Wars between the US and the Arabs, the tactics of the New Game players have not changed much because the market imperative forbids it.

In the markets of resources and raw materials, Australia depends for its survival in competition with the interests of Russia, China, India, and several African states. If these market dynamics do not make the level playing field which Australian governments claim they expect and demand from the global trading system; if force, fraud, corruption and subversion are pervasive in deciding who wins, what then are the scenarios for Australia’s future as a resource exporter?

What do Australian policymakers need to know and do to say in the game?

What lessons, what demands do Indian policymakers insist Canberra should learn, or else?

About the speaker:

John Helmer is visiting professor at the University of Melbourne and this semester he is teaching investigative journalism at the Institute of Advanced Journalism. He is the longest continuously serving foreign correspondent in Russia, and the only Western journalist to direct his own bureau independent of single national or commercial ties. Born and educated in Australia, then at Harvard University, he has also been a professor of political science, and an advisor to government heads in Greece, United States, and Asia. He has published several books and anthologies of essays.

7:30pm 23 August 2012

Institute of Postcolonial Studies

78-80 Curzon Street North Melbourne 3051

Charges: Waged: $5, Unwaged:$3, Members free


How can instinctive preferences improve policy outcomes?

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on August 6th, 2012

21 August , 2012
6:00 pmto7:00 pm


Photo by bupowski via flickr CC

Hosted by Grattan Institute and The Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG)

Why do people in some countries donate organs more than in others? Why do we not save enough for retirement even when we can afford to? Why don’t we buy energy-efficient appliances that save us money in the long run? How can more people be encouraged to live healthily?

Around the world, policy makers have begun to pay attention to the growing field of behavioural economics. Instead of assuming that citizens are the rational, interest-maximising agents of economics textbooks, behavioural economics starts with the more realistic assumption that people are shaped by cognitive biases, complications and limitations. Our rationality, self-control and self-interest are all bounded in ways that have implications for the way we design and implement public policies.

In this seminar John Daley will discuss with Donald Low and George Argyrous how behavioural economics can be applied to the design of public policy.

August 21, 6pm – 7pm
BMW Edge, Federation Square

>> Register to attend this free event here.