Posts Tagged ‘design’

May the force be with you – Service design for invisible connections

Posted in Events by emma.gerard on August 28th, 2013

29 August , 2013
6:00 pmto8:00 pm
Yodandy

Image from SDNM

From the Service Design Network Melbourne (SDNM) by Yoko Akama

The innocuous seeming arrows and lines in organisational charts and process diagrams often represent time, context, and connections that are essential to the experiences people have with those organisations. The problem is that arrows and connecting lines are so ubiquitous in diagrams that they seem invisible and are often overlooked.

It is much easier–and human nature—to focus effort on “things” because they represent tangible touchpoints, such as a website, ticket machine, and so on. As a result, many forget to attend to designing the experience of the arrows and lines—the transitions from one touchpoint to the next. They are too important to let just happen. Too important they are.

This talk with Dr. Andy Polaine and discussion explores how thinking about and designing the space and time between touchpoints can help bridge the silos within organisations that prevent engaging and positive service experiences from happening.

Dr. Andy Polaine has been involved in interaction design since the early 90s and was co-founder of the award-winning new media group, Antirom, in London. He was a creative producer at Razorfish, UK and later Interactive Director at Animal Logic, Sydney. Andy was Senior Lecturer and Head of the School of Media Arts at The University of New South Wales, Sydney before moving to Germany and holds a PhD from the University of Technology, Sydney in which he examined the relationship between play and interactivity. He now divides his time between being a Lecturer and Researcher in Service Design at the Lucerne School of Art and Design in Switzerland and his work as a service/interaction design consultant and writer, working with clients such as Telenor, VW Germany and live|work. He has written over 160 articles and papers and co-authored the Rosenfeld Media book, Service Design: From Insight to Implementation. He can be found online at polaine.com and on Twitter as @apolaine.

Time: August 29, 2013 from 6pm to 8pm
Location: Multipurpose Room (Level 1), RMIT Design Hub
Street: Victoria Street, corner of Swanston Street
City/Town: Melbourne
Event Type: talk
Organized By: Service Design Melbourne Network read more on their website


Premier’s Sustainability Awards 2013

Posted in Seeking by Jessica Bird on June 26th, 2013

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Cape Paterson Eco Village, winner of the Design category, Premier’s Sustainability Awards, 2012.

From the media release ‘Eco-leaders encouraged to enter Premier’s Sustainability Awards':

Individuals, businesses, community or government groups who have shown commitment to sustainability are encouraged to enter the Premier’s Sustainability Awards as positive role models for all Victorians. Now in their 11th year, the Premier’s Sustainability Awards celebrate efficient use of water, resources and energy, better waste management and recycling practices, the enhancement of the environment and effective, practical community action. The winner of last year’s Premier’s Sustainability Awards, Brightgreen, is urging Victorians who have developed a sustainable product or service to enter this year’s awards program, saying “it is a real thrill to be recognised on a state level… We entered the awards last year because they celebrate sustainable innovation – the whole driving force behind Brightgreen. We’re on a mission not just to make the most efficient or the brightest light but to actually change the way people think about lighting – encouraging them to see it as investment rather than something that’s disposable,” said Brightgreen Co-founder and CEO, David O’Driscoll. “The Premier’s Sustainability Awards align perfectly with everything that we set out to achieve.”

CEO of Sustainability Victoria, Stan Krpan, said that the awards are a great way to recognise and celebrate leadership in sustainability. This year the awards provide even more opportunities for recognition. Entries are open in eight categories: Infrastructure and Buildings, Tourism, Environmental Protection, Education, Innovative Product and Services, Small and Medium Enterprises (SME), Large Business, and Community.

>>> Entries close at 2pm Monday 15 July, 2013.
>>> Visit sustainabilityawards.vic.gov.au for entry criteria and kits, and queries.

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Getting Creative in the Suburbs

Posted in Events by Creative Suburbs on May 6th, 2013

9 May , 2013
7:00 pmto9:00 pm

Words

How can suburbs get creative and engaging? Talking about the role engagement plays in spatial justice, Alvaro Maz will be exploring ways cities can use -cool- marketing examples to design and interact with our parks, buildings and streets.

We will examine the way we engage with the urban form of our cities and  imagine the potential of having an inclusive, sustainable and creative places to live.

Alvaro is a former international development devotee interested in spreading ideas, examining and connecting places and people and feeding his new chocolate addiction; an urban thinker exploring new media with a beer and cheese appetite and passion for informal, vibrant communities. He lives, eats and blogs from Melbourne.  Alvaro is also the founder of Creative Suburbs, a community consultation platform to share and support ideas to enhance Melbourne’s suburbs.

Date: Thursday 9 May, 2013 
Time: 7.00pm
Venue: Elisabeth Murdoch Building, Victorian College of the Arts (Southbank campus), 234 St Kilda Road, Melbourne

Refreshments provided/gold coin donations welcome!

http://urbantalks.blogspot.com.au/2013/04/alvaro-maz-on-creative-suburbs-thursday.html


Reclaim the Curb Competition

Posted in Movements, Seeking, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on April 5th, 2013

rtc_competitionflyer

We like food fresh, fair and free. We like curb-sides that enrich and connect people. We’d like to support people that are inspired by the same things.

Reclaim the Curb, with support from Cultivating Community is making a minimum of $1,500 available to share across 3 exciting projects that put people and food, together, on curb-sides across Australia.

Competition entries should address the following requirements:

  • The project must use food as a way to activate an existing curb-side, or build on already active curb-sides. For example, planting fruit trees or making planter boxes that enhance curb-sides and streetscapes.
  • Must be implemented by October 2013
  • Projects should consider how simple infrastructure can support social exchange around food – or example, a food box for protecting food stuffs that can be swapped and shared by passersby, or a table and chairs that people can sit at and enjoy
  • Demonstrate that residents and businesses local to the project have been consulted, and are supportive of the plan
  • Demonstrate that the plan complies with local council requirements, or at a minimum:
    • Is safe
    • Does not obstruct passing foot or vehicle traffic, including space for opening car-doors
    • Has a maintenance plan to ensure the space is well kept
  • And include:
    • Details of the site including the address, photos, video’s or drawings
    • Details of the project plan including visual and verbal descriptions
    • Documentation that shows the project requirements listed above have been addressed

Three winners will be selected by a panel with representatives across the food activist field (more details on this to come, tune into the blog and facebook).

The prize money is currently $1,500 and will grow by the time the finalists are announced in May 31. The money will be used to pay for trees, seeds and manure/compost/clean soil. Winners will be expected to source their own materials including timber, spades, tools and other equipment used to build structures required for the project. If you wish to support this project please email reclaimthecurb (at) gmail.com Send questions and entries to reclaimthecurb (at) gmail.

Deadline is 5pm 31st May 2013.

>> http://reclaimthecurb.org/competition/


Speed Date a Sustainable Designer

Posted in Events by sashashtargot on February 15th, 2013

17 February , 2013
3:00 pmto5:00 pm

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It’s back in 2013! If you missed Speed Date a Sustainable Designer last year, this is your chance to discuss home renovation/building plans and ideas with leading green architects and designers. Held by the Alternative Technology Association with support from bankmecu, it’s free and part of the Sustainable Living Festival.

Ten minutes per ‘date’. All questions asked and answered!

When: Sunday February 17, 3pm

Where: The Green House, Birrarung Marr, Melbourne

Bookings essential. For more information on the event, designers available on the day and bookings, go to sdsd.ata.org.au

 


Life Beyond Single Use: eco-crafternoon

Posted in Events by TransitionTownPortPhillip on February 15th, 2013

23 February , 2013
12:00 pmto4:00 pm

Pre-loved PET pig

A local Sustainable Living Festival event, hosted by Transition Port Phillip.

Join us for an afternoon of creative workshops and transform waste into art. Learn how to make preloved PETs – upcycled clothing & jewellery – fused plastic flowers, purses & flags –  knit with plastic yarn (plarn)

Date: Saturday 23 February, 12-4pm.

Location: Port Phillip Eco Centre, 55a Blessington St, St Kilda

Bookings essential $5 earlybird (by 14 Feb) or $10 TryBooking.com

Transition Port Phillip is part of the Transition Town Network – our vision is to inspire and enhance connectedness and sustainable living.


Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037

Posted in Research, Visions by Jessica Bird on October 23rd, 2012


Image by D. Armellin

A local resilience-building project about climate extremes.

Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 is part of a larger research project Transforming Institutions for Climate Extremes. This project is led by Che Biggs at the Victorian Eco-Innovation Lab (VEIL) at the University of Melbourne. It aims to understand how communities and institutions can prepare and become more resilient to disruptive climate conditions. Anglesea was chosen as an ideal case-study site because it faces multiple climate hazards such as fire, drought and sea level rise but it also has a creative community and a strong local identity.

What is the Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 blog about?

The images and articles you see on the Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 blog are glimpses of possible futures. They depict strategies and ideas about how Anglesea could become more resilient to the more extreme possible impacts of climate change. The ideas represented have been developed from a workshop involving Anglesea community members. In the workshop people were asked to propose adaptation strategies in response to a series of challenging future scenarios that describe Anglesea in the year 2037. These scenarios were built from an assessment of climate model projections, historical records from along the Great Ocean Road and interviews with Anglesea residents. The small number of glimpses you see were combined and synthesised from more than 100 ideas developed in the workshop. Treat them as a window into a range of possible futures that might exist. We encourage you to comment on what is good or not good about the way they respond to challenges from climate change.

Why this project? When managing disaster risk, government and private sector organisations often rely heavily on ‘probability’ or ‘expert’ assessments of the likely type, extent and frequency of negative impacts. This can come unstuck when disasters occur outside what has been predicted and planned for. Transforming Institutions for Climate Extremes is a response to this problem. It responds to the call for new methods to improve community resilience and help communities improve disaster planning. It seeks to explore how prepared our communities, our decision-makers and decision-making processes are for the challenges of ‘new’ climate conditions. It will consider what institutional changes are needed to meet those challenges whilst ensuring community ownership.

Climate change in Anglesea? Anglesea lies in an area of southern Australia that will be affected by climate change in many ways. Climate models project that the most likely direct impacts will include changes to rainfall (drier but with more intense rainfall events), changes in temperature (warmer with more heatwaves), increasing acidity of oceans and rising sea levels. In-turn, these impacts are expected to affect a whole range of factors including increases in coastal erosion and days of extreme fire danger to increased risk of heat-stroke and changes to when plants flower and birds migrate. Climate Change is the effect of heat from the sun being trapped in the Earth’s atmosphere by gases produced by human activity. While some of these gases (like carbon dioxide) are found naturally in the atmosphere, as we increase their concentration above natural levels, they trap more heat from the sun – a bit like an insulation blanket.

You can view the glimpses of a resilient Anglesea in 2037 and comment at www.anglesea2037.com. You can also like the Facebook page to be kept up to date with the project.


How can instinctive preferences improve policy outcomes?

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on August 6th, 2012

21 August , 2012
6:00 pmto7:00 pm


Photo by bupowski via flickr CC

Hosted by Grattan Institute and The Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG)

Why do people in some countries donate organs more than in others? Why do we not save enough for retirement even when we can afford to? Why don’t we buy energy-efficient appliances that save us money in the long run? How can more people be encouraged to live healthily?

Around the world, policy makers have begun to pay attention to the growing field of behavioural economics. Instead of assuming that citizens are the rational, interest-maximising agents of economics textbooks, behavioural economics starts with the more realistic assumption that people are shaped by cognitive biases, complications and limitations. Our rationality, self-control and self-interest are all bounded in ways that have implications for the way we design and implement public policies.

In this seminar John Daley will discuss with Donald Low and George Argyrous how behavioural economics can be applied to the design of public policy.

August 21, 6pm – 7pm
BMW Edge, Federation Square

>> Register to attend this free event here.


Learning from European Cities

Posted in Models, Opinion by Kate Archdeacon on July 12th, 2012

 Source: The Fifth Estate


Photo by Jason Pier in DC via flickr CC

From “Sexy … as in small: the European angle on cities” by Robin Mellon, Green Building Council Australia (GBCA):

[…]

In Australia, we have borrowed much from Europe in the evolution of our cities, not least some of the names. But the majority of Australia’s urban development has occurred during the era of the motor car, and so our towns and cities are much less dense and much more sprawled. And with that broad expanse of country on which to build have come larger and larger homes.

On a worldwide scale, Australia already has five of the 20 least affordable cities, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit’s 2012 Worldwide Cost of Living survey. Energy prices are rising fast, mostly due to under-investment in infrastructure over the past 25 years, and water and landfill charges will be tracking in a similar direction.

Europe is similarly undergoing its own financial worries, with significantly higher levels of unemployment, inflation and national debts than Australia. But can we learn from our European cities? What have I taken away from the last few weeks? The lessons I’ve learned can be grouped into four areas:

It’s not the size that counts.

First and foremost is the question of building size – it really isn’t how much you’ve got, it’s what you do with it that counts. Many of the offices, houses and apartments I saw were simply smaller – there was less space available and a much greater demand for what there was, and so small apartments were the rule rather than the exception. There were also many more good design and good technology solutions for coping with small spaces – whether new development or retrofits. The bottom line is that smaller homes are cheaper to run – how much less would a 100 square metre apartment cost to operate than a 150 square metre apartment?

Small equals savings.

The cars you see in European capital cities are also smaller on average than those in Australia. Whole days would go by without me seeing a big 4WD or people-mover, with everyone using bicycle share schemes, public transport or chic little cars (many of which were, in turn, either car share schemes or rechargeable cars). Small cars are just cheaper to run, and often have a comparable safety rating to larger cars, especially when considering where and how they are most often driven.

Old world ideas for a new age.

Most of Europe’s older buildings were built at a time when ‘sustainability’ was not a buzz-word – they depended upon natural ventilation and natural daylight, shading from the sun, eaves, shutters, balconies on which to grow plants, dry washing and sit outside, and thick walls and insulated roofs to keep the buildings cool in summer and warm in winter. Many of these older buildings, therefore, have good opportunities for retrofitting, now that we can combine good passive design with good technologies and good behaviour.

Adjusting expectations.

Because smaller apartments and cars, and often older buildings, are the norm, people have different expectations. Sure, they might want the latest in modern convenience, but what was most readily available was small and traditional and so the expectations were lower. Certainly the dreams of a European first-time home owner do not equal a 250 square metre house and land package with double garage thrown in, but a small apartment in a walk-up block close to public transport. In Europe I heard many times that the percentage deposit needed for a mortgage was much higher; in turn this helps to keep expectations lower because the smaller the purchase, the smaller the deposit needed.

[…]

Read the full article by Robin Mellon on the Fifth Estate.


Water Sensitive Cities Tour 2012: Project snapshots

Posted in Research by Kate Archdeacon on June 21st, 2012


Photo of the Isar River in Munich by Marcio Cabral de Moura via flickr CC

From “Water Sensitive Cities 2012 Study Tour Group return home“:

The Water Sensitive Cities 2012 Study Tour group, comprising of 18 young water professionals from across Australia, have now completed the overseas leg of their trip. The group travelled to Singapore, the UK, Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands to develop their knowledge of integrated water management and to draw out relevant learnings that can aid Australia in moving towards a Water Sensitive City.

Tour participant Nicole Sexton, Senior Planner Strategy and Sustainability from Barwon Water, produced a poster presentation for the Healthy Cities Conference in Geelong on 6-8 June. The poster provides a snapshot of the sites that the group visited.

Click here to view the poster.