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Posts Tagged ‘cooling’

Passive Design for Ventilation in Apartments

Posted in Models by Kate Archdeacon on May 16th, 2012

Photo by John Gollings

From Maitiú Ward’s “Lilli Apartments” on Australian Design Review:


Despite the challenges of working mainly within the tight constraints of high-rise residential development, it is Elenberg Fraser’s stated ambition to introduce one new environmental feature into every building it designs.

As Fraser describes it, to date Lilli is the most successful exploration of the wind-model driven, passive systems approach it has been developing. While aesthetically striking, the distinctive scalloped striations of Lilli’s balconies have actually been carefully designed to draw air into the apartment interiors.

Working with engineering company VIPAC from data on site-specific solar and wind patterns, the facade elements have been modelled to not only provide sunshading, but also emphasise pressure differentials between the balconies off the living rooms and windows in the bedrooms.

In effect, rather than cross ventilation, what this creates is ‘through’ ventilation, as wind is trained across the facade and then sucked laterally through the apartment interior, in one opening and out the other.

Leaving the window to the surprisingly deep balcony open a crack, Fraser pops the casement window in the main bedroom, and sure enough, from my spot in the centre of the living room I feel a distinct breeze begin to play across my skin. It seems like such a small thing – a gentle eddy so subtle that many occupants may not even notice it; enough, perhaps, to keep them just those few degrees shy of reaching for the air conditioner remote – but it has wide implications.


Read the full article by Maitiú Ward.

Greening a Changing City: Urban forest, health, liveability

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on July 27th, 2011

28 July , 2011
6:00 pmto7:30 pm

Image: stevendepolo via flickr CC

Greening a changing city: urban forest, health, liveability:

As Melbourne inevitably grows, central to its environmental and economic sustainability, is its capacity to have green spaces that can be the lungs of the city. Appropriate tree planting can serve to reduce the heat island effect, as climate change affects our city. The benefits of an enhanced urban forest and green infrastructure will be part of the solution to future changes, as we grow and old trees need replacement. Commentators will discuss how a future urban forest might evolve. Better places and spaces, healthy trees and water storage contribute to human health, wellbeing and economic sustainability.

Panellists include: Dr Cecil C. Konijnendijk, Danish Centre for Forest, Landscape and Planning, University of Copenhagen; Dr Kate Auty, Commissioner for Environmental Sustainability, Melbourne; Rod Marsh from Net Balance, Joy Murphy AO a Wurundjeri elder and traditional owner and GP Dr Dimity Williams the Secretary of Doctors for the Environment Aust.

Thursday July 28, 6 – 7:30 pm

Melbourne Town Hall

No RSVP required

Keeping cool this summer: Moreland Solar City

Posted in Movements by Kate Archdeacon on November 16th, 2009

Source: Zero Carbon Moreland

Image: cristeenq via flickr CC

Air conditioning is not an essential requirement to keeping your home cool in summer. By using passive cooling techniques, you can keep the temperature of your home down.  Some easy actions to stay cool in summer are:

* Use outside shading such as adjustable blinds, awnings, shutters or even grow vines on a trellis to shade the windows, reducing heat transfer through the window glass.

* Avoid using heat producing appliances during the hottest parts of the day.

* If you have to use an air conditioner; make sure you avoid using it all day, switch it on for a few hours if and only when it is necessary. Also set your thermostat between 24 and 26 degrees.

To read more about staying cool in summer visit the Moreland Solar City webpage.