Posts Tagged ‘climate change’

The Island President: Premiere Screening and Q&A

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on April 27th, 2012

27 May , 2012
6:30 pmto8:30 pm

The Human Rights Art & Film Festival (HRAFF) presents the Australian premiere of The Island President.

Jon Shenk’s The Island President is the story of President Mohamed Nasheed of the Maldives, a man confronting a problem greater than any other world leader has ever faced—the literal survival of his country and everyone in it. After bringing democracy to the Maldives after thirty years of despotic rule, Nasheed is now faced with an even greater challenge: as one of the most low-lying countries in the world, a rise of three feet in sea level would submerge the 1200 islands of the Maldives enough to make them uninhabitable.

The Island President captures Nasheed’s first year of office, culminating in his trip to the Copenhagen Climate Summit in 2009, where the film provides a rare glimpse of the political horse-trading that goes on at such a top-level global assembly. Nasheed is unusually candid about revealing his strategies—leveraging the Maldives’ underdog position as a tiny country, harnessing the power of media, and overcoming deadlocks through an appeal to unity with other developing nations. When hope fades for a written accord to be signed, Nasheed makes a stirring speech which salvages an agreement. Despite the modest size of his country, Mohamed Nasheed has become one of the leading international voices for urgent action on climate change.

On February 7, 2012, Mohamed Nasheed resigned the presidency under the threat of violence in a coup d’état perpetrated by security forces loyal to the former dictator. This film is the story of his first year in office.

Mr Nasheed, often referred to as “the Mandela of the Maldives”, has been a human rights campaigner and a global warming activist throughout his life. He will participate in a Live Video Q&A at HRAFF following The Island President screening on the 27th of May 2012 at the ACMI Cinemas.

Australian Premiere HRAFF Closing Night: The Island President
Sunday, 27 May 2012, 6:30 pm
ACMI Cinemas

For more information and to book tickets: http://hraff.org.au/film-event/closing-night-the-island-president


Australia’s transition to a post carbon future: Post Carbon Pathways report

Posted in Movements, Research by Jessica Bird on April 11th, 2012


Image source: AAP 

From What Australia can learn from the world’s best de-carbonisation policies by John Wiseman and Taegen Edwards

Around the world an increasing number of detailed policy road maps are demonstrating the possibility, necessity and urgency of a rapid transition to a just and sustainable post carbon future. The key barriers to this transition are social and political, not technological and financial.

The Post Carbon Pathways report, published by the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, University of Melbourne and the Centre for Policy Development has reviewed 18 of the most comprehensive and rigorous post carbon economy transition strategies. As Australia enters the next phase of the climate change policy debate, this report will provide vital information on how other jurisdictions are designing and implementing large-scale plans to remove carbon from their economies. The review focuses on transition road maps produced by governments with the strongest emissions reduction targets, such as Germany, Denmark and the UK. It also looks at the most comprehensive and influential non-government authored strategies such as Zero Carbon Britain, Zero Carbon Australia and World in Transition (German Advisory Council on Global Change). Our analysis of these diverse ways of reaching a post-carbon future highlights several key lessons.

The window is closing fast
A wide range of detailed national and global level strategies demonstrate the technological and economic feasibility of rapidly moving to a post carbon economy. This goal can still be achieved at the scale and speed required to significantly reduce the risk of runaway climate change. But the gateway for effective action is rapidly closing. Decisive action in the next five to ten years will be critical. There is a crucial difference between transition strategies that advocate a pragmatic and evolutionary approach and those that advocate more rapid and transformational change. […]

Technology is not the most significant barrier
Analysis of these strategies shows that technological barriers are not the most significant obstacles to a fair and swift transition to a post carbon economy. The integrated suite of technological and systemic changes needed to reach a just and sustainable post carbon future will clearly need to include:

  • rapid reductions in energy consumption and improvements in energy efficiency
  • rapid replacement of fossil fuels by renewable energy
  • significant investment in forests and sustainable agriculture to draw down and sequester carbon into sustainable carbon sinks.

We already have the technologies to achieve emission reductions at the required speed and scale. Soaring investment in technological innovation, particularly in the United States, China and Germany, is driving down the price of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies at a remarkable speed.

Financial and economic barriers: significant but not insurmountable
The economic and social costs of failing to take action to reduce emissions are becoming increasingly clear – as are the multiple employment, health and environmental co-benefits of a swift transition to a post carbon economy. Most strategies advocate a mix of market based and regulatory mechanisms, underpinned by clear long-term emissions reduction targets. Some authors however remain cautious of relying too much on carbon pricing. They recommend additional, more direct interventions such as:

  • binding renewable energy targets
  • feed-in tariffs
  • eliminating fossil fuel subsidies
  • allocating the funds to close fossil fuel power stations.

Strategies with emissions reduction targets that are more strongly informed by climate science also commonly advocate a significant shift towards economic priorities which focus on improving social and ecological wellbeing rather than unconstrained growth in material consumption.  […]

There is no solution to climate change without climate justice
Intergenerational justice – the need to respect and protect the livelihoods and opportunities of future generations – remains the most powerful ethical justification for taking prudent and decisive climate change action now. There is also widespread recognition that political support for a rapid transition to a post carbon economy depends on implementing policies to overcome key social equity challenges – within and beyond national borders.

The key barriers are social and political
The biggest barriers preventing a rapid transition to a post carbon future are social and political – not technological and financial. The difficulty of securing and sustaining broad social and political support is widely recognised as the greatest barrier to a swift transition to a post carbon economy. The most significant gap in post carbon economy transition strategies is a lack of detailed game plans for mobilising political leadership and public support. Worryingly, even the most optimistic of the social change theories underpinning these strategies, tend to rely on a variety of ‘Pearl Harbor’ scenarios in which one or more catastrophic ecological events would provide the necessary wake up call. […] The development and communication of inspiring stories and compelling images of a just and sustainable post carbon future will be particularly crucial.

Australia’s post carbon pathway leadership challenge
The Australian Government’s 2020 emissions reduction target (a 5% decrease on 2000 levels) is clearly still far from the level required for Australia to make a responsible and fair contribution to global emissions reductions. Australia’s 2050 target (an 80% decrease on 2000 levels) is more robust. But there is no detail as yet as to how this target will be achieved. Evidence from the most promising transition strategies elsewhere suggests we need a more informed and thoughtful debate about the kind of economic growth and industry mix that Australia should aim for. We need to talk about the fairest approaches to mobilising the required levels of financial, human and social capital. Most importantly, a far more visionary level of political leadership will be required in order to drive an Australian climate change debate informed primarily by climate science rather than short-term calculations of political and economic feasibility. […]

Read the article in full on The Conversation.
Read the Post Carbon Pathways briefing paper, summary report or full report.


Forget Superheroes: Local Government to the Rescue

Posted in Movements, Research by Jessica Bird on March 6th, 2012


Image from: CDP Cities

CDP Cities is a voluntary reporting platform for cities around the world to document their actions on climate change. An initiative of the Carbon Disclosure Project, CDP Cities have produced this neat infographic compiling data from the 48 participating cities in 2011. Melbourne features in the section on individual cities, citing ‘creating urban and rooftop gardens, lighter buildings, and lightening roof and road colours to lessen urban heat island effect’ as actions being taken by the City council.


Transition Darebin hosts Nicole Foss (The Automatic Earth)

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on January 20th, 2012

19 February , 2012

Nicole Foss is one of those big picture people who understands and explains the links between the converging pressures affecting the globe (peak oil, climate change, financial crisis) and the implications for our everyday lives. Nicole explains why a period of deflation is likely and discusses household and community preparation strategies. Nicole is a systems analyst who lives in Canada and blogs under the name Stoneleigh with writing partner “Ilargi” at The Automatic Earth.

Transition Darebin is cohosting an all day workshop with Nicole and Steve Keen on Sun 19th February.

>>Flyer and Booking details

Check out the Transition Darebin post for information about other Nicole Foss events in Melbourne.


City Square Seminars: Climate Change & Environmental Politics

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on December 12th, 2011

13 December , 2011
7:00 pmto8:30 pm

Melbourne Free University at City Square in collaboration with Occupy Melbourne


Climate Change Adaptation National Congress

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on September 15th, 2011

13 October , 2011
14 October , 2011


Photo by benzpics63 via flickr CC

Climate change presents planners and decision-makers with unique challenges. How, when and at what scale climate change will impact us remains uncertain. What is clear is that adaptation needs to be part of our planning and risk management now.

3 Pillars Network in partnership with Net Balance, the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility and CSIRO Climate Adaptation Flagship present the 2nd Climate Change Adaptation Congress, a landmark event exploring the policy, strategies and business models needed to enable a climate resilient future for Australia. Planning for adaptation remains an outstanding challenge for the vast majority of Australian organisations. This is why we believe a practical and collaborative approach to addressing this issue is required. The Congress will create a space for knowledge sharing and ‘peer learning’ – drawing on the collective and unique expertise of organisations at all stages of adaptation planning. See About the Congress Structure for more details.

October 13 & 14, Melbourne Town Hall

Register now – early bird registration closes September 22.  Download the Event Program.


Seeking Program Partners: 13th Sustainable Living Festival

Posted in Seeking by Kate Archdeacon on September 15th, 2011

IT’S THE CELEBRATION THAT SUSTAINS A NATION

You are invited to join in the celebrations of the 13th annual Sustainable Living Festival. We want your ideas, imagination and insights into community education and mobilisation to help create the 2012 Festival program. This is the critical decade and we all know we need to help Australians achieve a new scale and speed of action for a safe climate and safe environment. The Festival’s role in helping to communicate this direction and showcase leading groups and solutions is a pivotal one in gaining community support for a mass transition to aid sustainability. The Festival’s program format is rapidly expanding to reach new audiences and develop fresh and more creative ways of engaging with people from all walks of life. We invite you to become a program partner today and help shape this direction and kick start the programming for Festival 2012.

  • BE A PART OF THE PROGRAM
  • PROMOTE YOUR WORK
  • LAUNCH YOUR NEW CAMPAIGNS
  • CONNECT WITH NEW AUDIENCES
  • JOIN THE TEN YEAR TRANSITION

FOR MORE INFORMATION Contact: Luke Taylor, Sustainable Living Foundation – luke@slf.org.au

Apply: Online Event Application Form – http://www.slf.org.au/festival

SUSTAINABLE LIVING FESTIVAL 2012 EVENT DATES 11 – 26 FEBRUARY


The Climate Reality Project

Posted in Events, Movements by Kate Archdeacon on September 8th, 2011

14 September , 2011

24 Hours of Reality

24 Presenters. 24 Time Zones. 13 Languages. 1 Message. 24 Hours of Reality is a worldwide event to broadcast the reality of the climate crisis. It will consist of a new multimedia presentation created by Al Gore and delivered once per hour for 24 hours, representing every time zone around the globe. Each hour people living with the reality of climate change will connect the dots between recent extreme weather events — including floods, droughts and storms — and the manmade pollution that is changing our climate. We will offer a round-the-clock, round-the-globe snapshot of the climate crisis in real time. The deniers may have millions of dollars to spend, but we have a powerful advantage. We have reality.

24 Hours of Reality will be broadcast live online from September 14 to 15, over 24 hours, representing 24 time zones and 13 languages.

From Tonga to Cape Verde, Mexico City to Alaska, Jakarta to London, people living with the impacts of climate change every day will tell their story. You can experience as much as you like without even leaving your home. Click here to find the location — or locations — where you would like to watch a presentation. Due to logistical considerations, three of the presentations will be broadcast remotely from New York — Tonga, the Solomon Islands and French Polynesia — but will include local footage and information. All other presentations will be filmed on location around the world. In Australia, people will congregate in each State and Territory to watch the Australian element of the event unfold. Click the link below to find out more about the event, and how you can hold your own viewing party or join another.

RSVP to the event on Facebook here


Exhibition Launch: Land is Life

Posted in Events by bencampbell on August 25th, 2011

4 September , 2011
1:00 pmto4:00 pm

Exhibition Launch: Land is Life, a free photographic exhibition by Oxfam Australia

Award winning photographer Rodney Dekker travelled with Oxfam to the Pacific Islands nations of Tuvalu and Kiribati, recording images and interviews with people whose daily lives and livelihoods are being affected by climate change.  This striking series of images shows aspects of daily life and culture, the impact of rising sea levels on local food crops and fresh water supplies and how people are adapting to climate change. The photos also tell of a spirit of determination and innovation as they prepare for their futures.

Additional to the photographs, we will be exhibiting climate change related art created by local artists. There will also be live music and finger food at the event. The exhibition will be officially launched by Federal Member for Kooyong, Josh Frydenberg.  Following the launch event, Land is Life will be held at Kew Library from Monday 5th September to Wednesday 5th October.

You can preview some of the photographs here: http://www.oxfam.org.au/act/events/land-is-life

Date: Sunday 4th September 2011
Time: 1.00pm to 4.00pm
Location: QPO, 186 High Street, Kew
RSVP: By Monday 31st August to Ben Campbell – benc@oxfam.org.au or 0416 305 004

 


“Anima Mundi”: Film screening

Posted in Events by TransitionTownPortPhillip on August 19th, 2011

12 September , 2011
8:00 pmto10:00 pm

Will you survive the transition of human industrial civilization happening now due to peak oil and climate change? Can you see the forest for the trees, the earth for the dream, the universe for the seed?

Join us Monday 12 September @ 7.30pm for 8pm screening of “ANIMA MUNDI”,  a new & innovative Aussie documentary about Permaculture, Peak Oil, Climate Change & the Soul of the World. with guest speakers, Filmmaker Peter Charles Downey & Integrative Medicine expert, Dr Mark O’Meadhra

SLOWdown restaurant cafe bar, 56 Acland Street, St Kilda (opp McDonalds)

Tickets $10 online or $11 on the door (subject to availability). Includes locally sourced produce nibblies & glass of wine. Sustainable pre-screening menu  available beforehand.

Proudly presented in partnership with SLOWdown eco-friendly cafe bar & Transition Town Port Phillip, supported by Port Phillip Urban Fresh Food Network & Veg Out Community Gardens.