Posts Tagged ‘climate change’

‘Chasing Ice’ film Screening at Port Phillip EcoCentre

Posted in Events by EcoCentre on October 18th, 2013

21 October , 2013
7:00 pmto9:00 pm


Follow National Geographic photographer James Balog across the Arctic documenting the world’s changing glaciers and gathering undeniable evidence of our changing planet.

Central to this film is the belief that we cannot divorce civilisation from nature. This vision is rendered in James Balog’s extraordinary photographs of ice and his compilation of video footage of glaciers melting at an unnatural rate. The film argues that global warming promises to turn sublime beauty on its head.

“This portrait of a man on a mission moves us, not by showing us what we’ve already lost, but what’s still at stake.”

Date: Monday 21 October, 7pm sharp start.
Venue: Port Phillip Ecocentre, Cnr Blessington & Herbert Streets, St Kilda(in the St Kilda Botanical Gardens)
Cost: $2 recommended minimum donation on the door.
Enquiries: Paula or Yas – 9534 0670


Climate of Change – Port Phillip EcoCentre film night

Posted in Events by EcoCentre on July 8th, 2013

15 July , 2013
7:00 pmto10:00 pm


The film Climate of Change is showing at Port Phillip EcoCentre on Monday 15 July, 7pm.

Narrated by Tilda Swinton, this optimistic film introduces regular people from around the world who are taking action in the fight against global warming. Poetry that details the beauty of earth’s soil, forests, water and bounty is interwoven with scenes of committed people who want to make a difference, from India, to Papua New Guinea, to Norway.

Venue: Port Phillip EcoCentre
(within the St Kilda Botanical Gardens)
Cnr Blessington & Herbert Streets
St Kilda

Enquiries: 9534 0670

>>>Tickets are $2 on the door, and you can book online.

Ethical Paper Pledge: Seeking Signatories!

Posted in Movements, Policies, Visions by ethicalpaper on March 27th, 2013

Ethical Paper

Paper production is the main driver of native forest logging in Australia. Native forest logging destroys crucial habitat for our native wildlife, degrades water catchments and releases vast amounts of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere.

The main domestic purchaser of native forest pulp logs in Victoria is Australian Paper. Australian Paper produces Reflex brand office papers. Companies and individuals that have taken the Ethical Paper Pledge are making a commitment not to purchase Reflex papers until Australian Paper commits to moving out of irreplaceable native forests and into plantation resources. This will send a strong message to Australian Paper that it is time to move towards a sustainable future.

To sign the Ethical Paper Pledge or to find out more, please visit or send an email to

Transitions Film Festival 2013

Posted in Events, Movements by Jessica Bird on February 14th, 2013

15 February , 2013 10:00 amto23 February , 2013 10:00 pm


TRANSITIONS FILM FESTIVAL, 15 to 23 February 2013
“See the change you want to be in the world”

Featuring an amazing line-up of films including Matt Damon and Gus Van Sant’s feature narrative Promised Land, The Sundance Institute’s A Fierce Green Fire and the highly anticipated Chasing Ice, the Transitions Film Festival runs from February 15-23rd at Federation Square, ACMI and Cinema Nova. The program also features introductions and panel discussions with international filmmakers and Australia’s sustainability leaders. Key guests include Bob Brown (former leader of The Australian Greens), Drew Hutton (Lock The Gate), John Wiseman (Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute), Anna Rose (AYCC) and Velcrow Ripper via satellite (Director of Occupy Love).

Transitions Film Festival is dedicated to showcasing powerful, inspiring and ground-breaking films from around the world that highlight the awe-inspiring global transformations that are taking place every day. Covering topics such as social entrepreneurship, energy politics, climate change, social justice and technological innovation, the festival hopes to inspire the transition to a sustainable world. To encourage low emissions transport, audience members riding bikes to Cinema Nova screenings will receive cyclist’s concession prices.

Important Dates:
Federation Square Free Screenings: 15-16 February 2013
Cinema Nova Program: 17 -23 February 2013
ACMI Shorts: 18 February 2013

>>> For more information and to view the program visit the Transitions Film Festival website.

Creative Suburbs Forum

Posted in Events by Jessica Bird on February 12th, 2013

15 February , 2013
2:00 pmto3:00 pm

6. Creative Suburbs

Are growing, liveable cities and neighbourhoods achievable? Join this interactive forum to find out.

How old will you be in 2040? What sort of place do you want Melbourne to be? It is now obvious that Melbourne’s population will continue to grow. It is also obvious that climate change will have a major effect on how we live. The changes to our lives, and costs, are likely to be significant. Think: transport, electricity, gas and water. However, population growth can be comfortably accommodated, and can positively lead to thriving communities within existing urban growth boundaries. Many of the necessary processes and technologies already exist. The catch is: we must effectively plan now.

That’s where you come in. This is not just a matter for the government, developers, and planning ‘experts’. This forum gives you the chance to nurture the positive ideas, put a blowtorch to the negative ideas, and learn about what can be done to maintain Melbourne as a sustainable and liveable city.

Forum collaborators include: Urban Design Forum, Urban Rethink, Heart Foundation, Deakin University and Planning Institute of Australia and Creative Suburbs.

When:  2pm – 3pm, Friday 15th February
Where: The Shed
River Promenade, Fed Square
>>> This forum is being held as part of the Sustainable Living Festival, check the website to find out more.

BZE presents David Spratt: climate change and extreme weather

Posted in Events by Mark Ogge on January 31st, 2013

4 February , 2013
6:30 pmto8:00 pm


Monthly discussion group hosted by Beyond Zero Emissions focusing on energy solutions to climate change. Featuring David Spratt, co-author of the ground breaking Climate Code Red.


Time: 6:30- 8pm, Monday 4 February,  2013

Fritz Loewe Theatre (entry via level 2)
McCoy Building
University of Melbourne
Cnr Elgin & Swanston Streets, Carlton

Entry: Gold coin donation

Co-author of Climate Code Red, David Spratt will present the latest climate science and its links to increasing extreme weather events worldwide. Australia has experienced record high temperatures, heatwaves and bushfires already this year with the Bureau of Meteorology adding two new colours to its weather forecasting chart to take the highest temperature up from 50 to 54 degrees. In 2012 climate science observations saw a record summer Arctic sea ice melt, record Greenland ice sheet melt, record permafrost warming, as well as increasing floods, cyclones, droughts and heatwaves. With climate scientists predicting more extreme events, David also shows what we can expect at the 2 and 4 degree warming scenarios. David is also an experienced activist and will talk about the urgent action we can take to tackle the climate emergency.

Thank you to the University of Melbourne Energy Institute, our Zero Carbon Australia project partners for supporting us in bringing you this event.

For those outside Melbourne: LIVE streaming of this event in HD720 video is available.  For further reading follow the links to these articles: Climate Code Red,  Temperatures off the charts as Australia turns deep purpleThe 2013 climate change wake-up call,  Heat waves exacerbated by climate change.

Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037

Posted in Research, Visions by Jessica Bird on October 23rd, 2012

Image by D. Armellin

A local resilience-building project about climate extremes.

Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 is part of a larger research project Transforming Institutions for Climate Extremes. This project is led by Che Biggs at the Victorian Eco-Innovation Lab (VEIL) at the University of Melbourne. It aims to understand how communities and institutions can prepare and become more resilient to disruptive climate conditions. Anglesea was chosen as an ideal case-study site because it faces multiple climate hazards such as fire, drought and sea level rise but it also has a creative community and a strong local identity.

What is the Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 blog about?

The images and articles you see on the Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 blog are glimpses of possible futures. They depict strategies and ideas about how Anglesea could become more resilient to the more extreme possible impacts of climate change. The ideas represented have been developed from a workshop involving Anglesea community members. In the workshop people were asked to propose adaptation strategies in response to a series of challenging future scenarios that describe Anglesea in the year 2037. These scenarios were built from an assessment of climate model projections, historical records from along the Great Ocean Road and interviews with Anglesea residents. The small number of glimpses you see were combined and synthesised from more than 100 ideas developed in the workshop. Treat them as a window into a range of possible futures that might exist. We encourage you to comment on what is good or not good about the way they respond to challenges from climate change.

Why this project? When managing disaster risk, government and private sector organisations often rely heavily on ‘probability’ or ‘expert’ assessments of the likely type, extent and frequency of negative impacts. This can come unstuck when disasters occur outside what has been predicted and planned for. Transforming Institutions for Climate Extremes is a response to this problem. It responds to the call for new methods to improve community resilience and help communities improve disaster planning. It seeks to explore how prepared our communities, our decision-makers and decision-making processes are for the challenges of ‘new’ climate conditions. It will consider what institutional changes are needed to meet those challenges whilst ensuring community ownership.

Climate change in Anglesea? Anglesea lies in an area of southern Australia that will be affected by climate change in many ways. Climate models project that the most likely direct impacts will include changes to rainfall (drier but with more intense rainfall events), changes in temperature (warmer with more heatwaves), increasing acidity of oceans and rising sea levels. In-turn, these impacts are expected to affect a whole range of factors including increases in coastal erosion and days of extreme fire danger to increased risk of heat-stroke and changes to when plants flower and birds migrate. Climate Change is the effect of heat from the sun being trapped in the Earth’s atmosphere by gases produced by human activity. While some of these gases (like carbon dioxide) are found naturally in the atmosphere, as we increase their concentration above natural levels, they trap more heat from the sun – a bit like an insulation blanket.

You can view the glimpses of a resilient Anglesea in 2037 and comment at You can also like the Facebook page to be kept up to date with the project.

Agroecology versus Industrial Agriculture: Infographic

Posted in Models by Jessica Bird on September 27th, 2012

Source: Nourishing The Planet

Infographic by The Christiansen Fund

From the Infographic ‘Soil to Sky: of agroecology versus industrial agriculture’ by The Christiansen Fund

In order to feed our world without destroying it, an holistic type of agriculture is needed, and we have a choice. Here we compare the current high-input industrial system with a renewed vision for agriculture: the agroecolocial system. […]

Agroecological strategies can better feed the world, fight climate change and poverty, and protect soil and water while maintaining healthy, liveable communities and local economies. Industrial agriculture contributes to climate change, malnutrition and ecosystem degradation around the planet. It has not delivered on its promise to feed the world.

Climate Change Science: Impacts and Adaptation for Victoria Public Lecture & Symposium

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on August 24th, 2012

20 September , 2012
21 September , 2012
Climate Change Science: Impacts and Adaptation for Victoria Public Lecture & Symposium

This is one of a series of annual Royal Society Victoria Symposia on Scientific issues of importance to Victoria. It will consist of formal presentations and panel discussions on three aspects of the science of climate change.

  • The Physical Science
  • Impacts on Victoria
  • Adaptation to Climate Change

Speakers are leading academics from Universities, CSIRO, Bureau of Meteorology and the State Government. Most speakers have played leading roles in the assessments of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

The intended audience is University staff and students, Royal Society of Victoria members, representatives of planning authorities and the state government, and the general public.


Understanding and managing the risks of climate extremes are important challenges for Australian scientists as well as for planners and politicians.

  • The Physical Science: Talks and panel sessions on the observational record, on the major climate drivers for Victoria, on the science of climate change projections and on the science of extreme weather events.
  • Impacts on Victoria: Talks have been invited on the impacts on health, on water supply for cities and agriculture, and on sea-level rise and coastal inundation
  • Adaptation to Climate Change: Adaptation addresses options for reducing exposure and vulnerability to changing climate and its impacts. It also addresses options for increasing resilience to the potential adverse impacts of climate extremes.

The proceedings of the Symposium will appear as a special issue (in 2013) of the peer-reviewed journal: Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria.

Symposium: Friday 21 September 9.00 am – 5.00 pm and Saturday 22 September 9.30 am – 1 p.m

>> Click here to find out more about the symposium.

Free Public Lecture: Thursday 20 September 

>> Click here for registration for the free lecture.

The Symposium and Lecture will be held at University of Melbourne in the Basement Theatre, Spot Building, (cnr Berkeley and Pelham Streets, Parkville) University of Melbourne.

Social justice and adaptation to sea-level rise in Gippsland East: Seminar

Posted in Events, Research by Kate Archdeacon on May 10th, 2012

24 May , 2012
12:00 pmto1:00 pm

Photo by F.d.W. via flickr CC

The Brotherhood of St Laurence, Research & Policy Centre invites you to attend these free lunchtime seminars:

Professor Jon Barnett, Resource Management and Geography, University of Melbourne

As knowledge and modeling of the risks of sea-level rise builds momentum so too does the need to begin processes to adapt to avoid these risks. This seminar will be an informal discussion of an ongoing ARC Linkage Project in Gippsland East which aims to understand the equity dimensions of climate change for small coastal communities. Amongst the research locales are Lakes Entrance, Port Albert, Seaspray, Manns Beach and McLoughlins Beach. We will present findings about policy-makers’ views of the ‘problem’ in this area, and emerging insights about the nature of social justice with respect to adaptation to sea-level rise.

Jon Barnett is a Professor in the Department of Resource Management and Geography at Melbourne University. He is a political geographer whose research investigates the impacts of and responses to climate change on social systems, with a focus on risks to human insecurity, hunger, violent conflict, and water stress. He has done extensive field-work in the South Pacific, China, and East Timor. Jon is convenor of the national research network on the social, economic and institutional dimensions of climate change, which is part of the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, and is a Lead Author for the forthcoming Fifth Assessment Report of the IPCC. Jon is co-lead investigator on this project, along with Professor Ruth Fincher from the Geography program at the University of Melbourne, and Dr Anna Hurlimann, who is a Senior Lecturer in Urban Planning at Melbourne University.

12noon-1pm, Thursday 24 May

Brotherhood of St Laurence, 67 Brunswick Street, Fitzroy in Father Tucker’s Room

>>RSVP to attend this event here