Posts Tagged ‘behaviour change’

Tassivore tasting trail – for bike riders and foodies

Posted in Models, Movements by Jessica Bird on December 14th, 2012


Photo from the Tassivore Tasting Trail Map.

From the Tassivore Eat Local Challenge:

If you live in southern Tasmania, or are just passing through, and love eating fantastic local food and zipping around on your treadlie (bicycle) then this is the trail for you!

Eight of our best eateries and Hobart’s fabulous Farm Gate Market will be showcasing at least one Tassievore dish (see definition below) for four months from the first of January until the end of April 2013. […]

How does it work? The venues listed on the map are all passionate about Tasmanian produce and have committed to supplying at least one Tassievore dish for the duration of the trail. How you follow the trail is up to you. You can aim for a big day and ride the length of the trail to MONA and back (a 50km commitment) and drop in at the venues that suit your need to rest and eat, or you can pick and choose, and take your time to visit a range of the fabulous establishments involved. Equally you can take pot luck with what Tasmanian delights await you or phone ahead to work out what type of dishes there are to suit your mood.

What is a Tassievore dish? A Tassievore dish is totally Tasmanian (exceptions for minor ingredients such as spices and raising agents) and will be identified by the Tassievore logo or enquiry with staff at the venue. Updates about dishes on offer will be posted on the Tassievore Eat Local Challenge facebook page and Tassievore twitter feed.

Riding notes: If you are an inexperienced rider, or don’t have many gears on your bike, stick to the restaurants around the waterfront and along the bike path to MONA. If you have a bit more experience, and more gears, then the whole trail is up for grabs. […]

>> You can find out more on the Tassivore blog.
>> You can also download the Tasting Trail map and notes.


Social Enterprise Conference: Global Shifts 2012

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on November 12th, 2012

12 December , 2012 8:30 amto14 December , 2012 7:00 pm

Global Shifts 2012 – Social Enterprise Conference

Bringing together change-makers, entrepreneurs and high-profile leaders from Australia and abroad the conference will discuss, debate and demonstrate ways in which pushing the boundaries of existing business models can contribute to positive social change.

The conference builds on the groundswell of activity and commitment in the social enterprise space in our region and beyond, and aims to coalesce this energy into a powerful movement for change.

Held over three days the conference will not only stimulate and engage you in ideas and actions, you will have the opportunity to explore social enterprise Melbourne, network, and converse with people from all over the world who are seeking to bring about change.

12 – 14 December

9 workshops; 17 panel sessions; 1 debate and 1 real-live (Social) Dragon’s Den. 5 keynote sessions. 70+ speakers from Cambodia, India, United States, Bhutan, Vietnam, Africa, Palestine, Israel, the UK and Europe; as well as from all over Australia – from cities and from the outback. From philanthropic not-for-profits to big businesses making big changes… this is the Social Enterprise ecosystem in all its diversity and complexity.

If you’ve ever wondered if it’s possible to make a difference…

If you want to find out more about how social enterprises function and what models really work…

If you want to be inspired; learn; debate; discuss; argue; and be amazed…

Then this is the conference for you: 3 days in Melbourne, 12-14 December…might just change your life.

>> www.rmit.edu.au/globalshifts


Ride to Work Day: October 17

Posted in Events, Movements by Kate Archdeacon on October 11th, 2012

17 October , 2012


Photo: Matt Biddulph via flickr CC

The Ride2Work Program aims to get people started and keep them riding to work.

Ride2Work Day 2012 is Wednesday 17 October.

The Ride2Work Program is a nationally run, year round program that actively encourages thousands of Australians thinking of commuting by bicycle to give it a try. Existing riders can share their knowledge and experience with peers, as well as support and encourage those starting out.

Ride2Work has a strong influence in the dramatic increase of people choosing to ride to work, with 38% of new riders registered in 2011 still riding to work five months later.

The big event on the Ride2Work calendar is Ride2Work Day, the only nationally recognised event of its kind which provides an opportunity for individuals and organisations to join over 150,000 Australians celebrating riding to work and encourages people that don’t currently ride to give it a go. Register, and then see if there’s a Community Breakfast on the day near you.

>>Ride2Work

How can instinctive preferences improve policy outcomes?

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on August 6th, 2012

21 August , 2012
6:00 pmto7:00 pm


Photo by bupowski via flickr CC

Hosted by Grattan Institute and The Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG)

Why do people in some countries donate organs more than in others? Why do we not save enough for retirement even when we can afford to? Why don’t we buy energy-efficient appliances that save us money in the long run? How can more people be encouraged to live healthily?

Around the world, policy makers have begun to pay attention to the growing field of behavioural economics. Instead of assuming that citizens are the rational, interest-maximising agents of economics textbooks, behavioural economics starts with the more realistic assumption that people are shaped by cognitive biases, complications and limitations. Our rationality, self-control and self-interest are all bounded in ways that have implications for the way we design and implement public policies.

In this seminar John Daley will discuss with Donald Low and George Argyrous how behavioural economics can be applied to the design of public policy.

August 21, 6pm – 7pm
BMW Edge, Federation Square

>> Register to attend this free event here.


Learning from European Cities

Posted in Models, Opinion by Kate Archdeacon on July 12th, 2012

 Source: The Fifth Estate


Photo by Jason Pier in DC via flickr CC

From “Sexy … as in small: the European angle on cities” by Robin Mellon, Green Building Council Australia (GBCA):

[…]

In Australia, we have borrowed much from Europe in the evolution of our cities, not least some of the names. But the majority of Australia’s urban development has occurred during the era of the motor car, and so our towns and cities are much less dense and much more sprawled. And with that broad expanse of country on which to build have come larger and larger homes.

On a worldwide scale, Australia already has five of the 20 least affordable cities, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit’s 2012 Worldwide Cost of Living survey. Energy prices are rising fast, mostly due to under-investment in infrastructure over the past 25 years, and water and landfill charges will be tracking in a similar direction.

Europe is similarly undergoing its own financial worries, with significantly higher levels of unemployment, inflation and national debts than Australia. But can we learn from our European cities? What have I taken away from the last few weeks? The lessons I’ve learned can be grouped into four areas:

It’s not the size that counts.

First and foremost is the question of building size – it really isn’t how much you’ve got, it’s what you do with it that counts. Many of the offices, houses and apartments I saw were simply smaller – there was less space available and a much greater demand for what there was, and so small apartments were the rule rather than the exception. There were also many more good design and good technology solutions for coping with small spaces – whether new development or retrofits. The bottom line is that smaller homes are cheaper to run – how much less would a 100 square metre apartment cost to operate than a 150 square metre apartment?

Small equals savings.

The cars you see in European capital cities are also smaller on average than those in Australia. Whole days would go by without me seeing a big 4WD or people-mover, with everyone using bicycle share schemes, public transport or chic little cars (many of which were, in turn, either car share schemes or rechargeable cars). Small cars are just cheaper to run, and often have a comparable safety rating to larger cars, especially when considering where and how they are most often driven.

Old world ideas for a new age.

Most of Europe’s older buildings were built at a time when ‘sustainability’ was not a buzz-word – they depended upon natural ventilation and natural daylight, shading from the sun, eaves, shutters, balconies on which to grow plants, dry washing and sit outside, and thick walls and insulated roofs to keep the buildings cool in summer and warm in winter. Many of these older buildings, therefore, have good opportunities for retrofitting, now that we can combine good passive design with good technologies and good behaviour.

Adjusting expectations.

Because smaller apartments and cars, and often older buildings, are the norm, people have different expectations. Sure, they might want the latest in modern convenience, but what was most readily available was small and traditional and so the expectations were lower. Certainly the dreams of a European first-time home owner do not equal a 250 square metre house and land package with double garage thrown in, but a small apartment in a walk-up block close to public transport. In Europe I heard many times that the percentage deposit needed for a mortgage was much higher; in turn this helps to keep expectations lower because the smaller the purchase, the smaller the deposit needed.

[…]

Read the full article by Robin Mellon on the Fifth Estate.


If you don’t understand habits, how can you hope to change them? Seminar

Posted in Events by jmcurtis on July 9th, 2012

24 July , 2012
5:30 pmto6:30 pm

Why do we behave the way we do? Why does it seem so difficult to change behaviour? Common sense suggests, and many behaviour change programs optimistically assume, that we weigh up the pros and cons of a behaviour before we decide to perform it. But in reality, many of the behaviours that we undertake in our daily lives are “habits”, which are performed without much conscious thought or deliberation. As a result, conventional approaches to influencing behaviour (e.g., information and incentives) are less likely to be effective when behaviours are habitual.

In a seminar to be held on Tuesday 24 July in Melbourne, one of the world’s leading experts on habits—Professor Bas Verplanken—will discuss the importance of understanding habits when developing interventions to influence behaviour (with a particular focus on environmental sustainability). He will highlight how habits can be measured, broken and created, and will offer guidance on timing interventions at key “moments of change” when habits are particularly vulnerable. Bas will argue that habits can serve as barriers as well as opportunities, and should take centre stage in behaviour change interventions.

Tuesday, 24 July 2012
5.30 – 6.30 pm

The 242 Telstra Conference Centre
242 Exhibition Street
Melbourne

This is a free public event.
All welcome

RSVP james.curtis@monash.edu by 20 July 2012

About the speaker: Bas Verplanken is a professor of psychology and the head of the Department of Psychology at the University of Bath, England. He specialises in theory-informed applied research, with a particular emphasis on habits in the health, consumer and environmental behaviour fields. Bas Verplanken is being hosted by BehaviourWorks Australia—a collaboration between the Monash Sustainability Institute, EPA Victoria, The Shannon Company and Sustainability Victoria that brings together interdisciplinary researchers with leading practitioners who share an interest in behaviour change research and environmental sustainability


DIY Project: Video competition

Posted in Seeking by sashashtargot on July 6th, 2012


Rocket Stove photo by eustatic via flickr CC

Do you have a creative, quirky or interesting DIY project you’d like to share? Maybe you’ve done an inspiring house retrofit, rigged up a unique greywater system, made a gadget or converted a petrol car to electric.

Grab your camera or even your phone, and send ReNew Magazine a video of under five minutes showing the steps you took in your DIY project, and how it improves your life, saves energy or water, or reduces waste.

Submissions will feature on the Alternative Technology Association’s (ATA) YouTube channel to help inspire others. The winner will receive a $500 EnviroShop gift certificate. To enter, click here.

Entries close on July 31, 2012.

ReNew: Technology for a sustainable future is published by the ATA, a not-for-profit organisation promoting renewable energy, sustainable design and water saving.


Inclusive Growth, Welfare and Development Policy: International Forum

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on May 29th, 2012

29 June , 2012



This one-day Forum will be hosted by the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences in partnership with the Brotherhood of St Laurence. The Forum aims to bridge the divide between welfare and social policy, and development practice through the prism of ‘inclusive growth’.

Drawing upon the expertise of leading international policymakers and academics in the field, the Forum will explore the following salient themes:

  1. Critiquing the theoretical underpinning of growth and development
  2. Examining welfare state perspectives on inclusive growth and social/economic development
  3. Presenting lessons learned and best practices from developing and developed economies

These themes will be explored at four sessions during the one-day Forum titled:

  • The Inclusive Growth Paradigm
  • Inclusive Growth and Development
  • Inclusive Growth and Welfare
  • Development, Welfare and Policy Practice
Friday 29 June 2012

Public Lecture Theatre Old Arts Building, University of Melbourne

$60 per person including morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea.

Register at http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/bslforum

For enquiries contact Tamsin Courtney tamsinc@unimelb.edu.au


The Island President: Premiere Screening and Q&A

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on April 27th, 2012

27 May , 2012
6:30 pmto8:30 pm

The Human Rights Art & Film Festival (HRAFF) presents the Australian premiere of The Island President.

Jon Shenk’s The Island President is the story of President Mohamed Nasheed of the Maldives, a man confronting a problem greater than any other world leader has ever faced—the literal survival of his country and everyone in it. After bringing democracy to the Maldives after thirty years of despotic rule, Nasheed is now faced with an even greater challenge: as one of the most low-lying countries in the world, a rise of three feet in sea level would submerge the 1200 islands of the Maldives enough to make them uninhabitable.

The Island President captures Nasheed’s first year of office, culminating in his trip to the Copenhagen Climate Summit in 2009, where the film provides a rare glimpse of the political horse-trading that goes on at such a top-level global assembly. Nasheed is unusually candid about revealing his strategies—leveraging the Maldives’ underdog position as a tiny country, harnessing the power of media, and overcoming deadlocks through an appeal to unity with other developing nations. When hope fades for a written accord to be signed, Nasheed makes a stirring speech which salvages an agreement. Despite the modest size of his country, Mohamed Nasheed has become one of the leading international voices for urgent action on climate change.

On February 7, 2012, Mohamed Nasheed resigned the presidency under the threat of violence in a coup d’état perpetrated by security forces loyal to the former dictator. This film is the story of his first year in office.

Mr Nasheed, often referred to as “the Mandela of the Maldives”, has been a human rights campaigner and a global warming activist throughout his life. He will participate in a Live Video Q&A at HRAFF following The Island President screening on the 27th of May 2012 at the ACMI Cinemas.

Australian Premiere HRAFF Closing Night: The Island President
Sunday, 27 May 2012, 6:30 pm
ACMI Cinemas

For more information and to book tickets: http://hraff.org.au/film-event/closing-night-the-island-president


Do pro-environmental behaviours spill over? BehaviourWorks Seminar

Posted in Events, Research by Kate Archdeacon on April 13th, 2012

23 April , 2012
5:30 pmto6:30 pm

Environmental organisations, governments and businesses often rely on “positive spillover strategies” to drive pro-environmental behaviour change.

These strategies rest on the assumption that targeting simple and painless actions can spillover into motivating other related and more ambitious environmental behaviours. But such endeavours might also lead to “negative spillover effects”, where the adoption of one particular pro-environmental behaviour decreases the prospects of other related actions being performed.

In this seminar, one of the world’s leading experts on this topic—Professor John Thøgersen—will give an introduction to spillover, discuss evidence supporting and challenging spillover effects, and offer a number of tips to optimise the chances of achieving positive spillover effects in behaviour change programs.

About the speaker: John Thøgersen is a professor of economic psychology at Aarhus University, Denmark. In addition to spillover, his research interests include social and environmental marketing, social and moral norms in the environmental field, media influences on consumer behaviour and sustainability, and the inter-generational transfer of pro-environmental values, attitudes and behaviour.

John Thøgersen is being hosted by BehaviourWorks Australia—a joint venture between the Monash Sustainability Institute, EPA Victoria, The Shannon Company and Sustainability Victoria that brings together interdisciplinary researchers with leading practitioners who share an interest in behaviour change research and environmental sustainability.

Monday, 23 April 2012 5.30 – 6.30 pm

Village Roadshow Theatrette State Library of Victoria
Entry 3, 179 La Trobe Street Melbourne

This is a free public event. All welcome

RSVP james.curtis@monash.edu by 18 April 2012