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Posts Tagged ‘Australian Policy Online’

Green Gold Rush

Posted in Research by Maeztri on November 11th, 2008

This abstract was recently listed on Australian Policy Online. To see the original document visit Green gold rush: How ambitious environmental policy can make Australia a leader in the race for green jobs .

Green gold rush: How ambitious environmental policy can make Australia a leader in the race for green jobs
Australian Conservation Foundation and Australian Council of Trade Unions
Posted: 30-10-2008

Australia could become a world leader in creating ‘green industries generating up to a million green collar jobs by 2030 and multi-billion dollar export opportunities in green technology, according to this report from ACF and ACTU.

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Innovation and the city: challenges for the built environment industry

Posted in Research by Devin Maeztri on November 5th, 2008

This abstract was recently listed on Australian Policy Online. To see the original document visit Innovation and the city: challenges for the built environment industry.

Innovation and the city: challenges for the built environment industry
Simon Pinnegar, Jane Marceau and Bill Randolph / City Futures Research Centre
Posted: 16-10-2008

The built environment, especially our largest cities, faces substantial change in the next twenty years if it is to meet the increasing demands for carbon neutrality, reduced water consumption and more efficient resource consumption. The industries that design, build, retrofit, manage and maintain the built environment face equally significant changes in organisation, working practices and skills development, approaches to design and construction and materials development if they are to meet these challenges.

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A national energy efficiency program to assist low-income households

Posted in Research by Devin Maeztri on October 20th, 2008

This abstract was recently listed on Australian Policy Online. To see the original document visit A national energy efficiency program to assist low-income households.

A national energy efficiency program to assist low-income households
KPMG, Brotherhood of St Laurence and Ecos Corporation

Posted: 25-09-2008

This report recommends the federal government implements a national energy efficiency program for 3.5 million low-income households over the next seven years. Although the government has committed to CPI indexation and cash assistance, cash assistant alone does not represent the best long-term solution for low-income households and government.

The program would involve a home visit that would determine the most appropriate package of energy efficiency measures for each household. Each household would receive energy efficiency improvements up to the value of $2,000 (including the cost of the visit). The energy efficiency improvements may include, compact fluorescent light bulb (CFL) light bulbs, efficient shower roses, weather proofing, curtains, ceiling insulation and efficient refrigerators. Some households with special circumstances that need energy efficient water heating or air-conditioning may receive a grant of up to $6,000.

This report finds that the costs of energy will rise substantially even without the introduction of the CPRS. An improvement in energy efficiency provides an opportunity for an effective demand side response by households that can shield households from the impact of rising energy costs through a reduction of energy consumption.

To read the full document visit A national energy efficiency program to assist low-income households – download full document


Troubled waters: confronting the water crisis in Australia’s cities

Posted in Policies by Devin Maeztri on October 17th, 2008

This abstract was recently listed on Australian Policy Online. To see the original document visit Troubled waters: confronting the water crisis in Australia’s cities.

Troubled waters: confronting the water crisis in Australia’s cities
Patrick Troy (ed) / ANU E Press
Posted: 02-10-2008

Australian cities have traditionally relied for their water on a ‘predict-and-provide philosophy that gives primacy to big engineering solutions. In more recent years privatised water authorities, seeking to maximise consumption and profits, have reinforced the emphasis on increasing supply. Now the cities must cope with the stresses these policies have imposed on the eco-systems from which they harvest water, into which they discharge wastes, and on which they are located. Residents are having to pay more for their water, while the cities themselves are becoming less sustainable. Must we build more dams and desalination plants, or should we be managing the demand for urban water more prudently? This book explores the demand for urban water and how it has changed in response to shifting social mores over the past century. It explains how demand for centralised provision of water might be reshaped to enable the cities to better cope with expected changes in supply as our climate changes. And it discusses the implications of property rights in water for proposals to privatise water services.

To read the full document visit The Australian National University E Press – download full document


Who are the (un)intended losers from emissions trading?

Posted in Research by Devin Maeztri on October 15th, 2008

This abstract was recently listed on Australian Policy Online. To see the original document visit Who are the (un)intended losers from emissions trading?.

Who are the (un)intended losers from emissions trading?
David Richardson / The Australia Institute

Posted: 23-09-2008

The Introduction of an Emissions Trading Scheme has the potential to significantly reduce Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions, but the issue of which groups should be compensated, and by how much, is yet to be addressed. In this paper the Institute makes the case for providing substantial compensation to community groups, state and local governments, and even Commonwealth Departments. It argues that the increased cost of electricity, combined with the increase in prices more generally, will result in an increase in the cost of providing government and community services. Rather than providing greater compensation to the big polluters, this paper spell out the need to instead provide compensation to those organisations that provide essential services to some of the most vulnerable groups in the community.

To read the full document visit Who are the (un)intended losers from emissions trading? – download full document


“Impacts of climate change on human settlements” report

Posted in Research by Ferne Edwards on August 6th, 2008

The article below is republished from the Australian Policy Online website. To view the original article, please click here.

Impacts of climate change on human settlements in the western port region: people, property and place
Peter Kinrade and Benjamin Preston / CSIRO, Marsden Jacob Associates and WPGA, Australia
Posted: 23-07-2008

This report examines the nature and extent of potential impacts of climate change to the Western Port region of Victoria. The report’s focus is on the impacts of climate change on the built environment, the social and economic implications of the impacts and the vulnerability of different localities and groups. It is one part of a wider integrated assessment of climate change in the region that covers:

  • regional climate changes and biophysical impacts;
  • socio-economic and infrastructure impacts (this report);
  • risk assessment; and
  • adaptation response.

> Read full text, [7.63 MB, PDF]