Archive for the ‘Visions’ Category

Visions refer to ideas for a sustainable future in Melbourne. Visions links in strongly with the overall Victorian Eco-Innovation Lab (VEIL) project, which designs visions to change our current direction towards a more sustainable future. Posts here on Sustainable Melbourne relate to visions produced by people and organisations based in Melbourne, while more information can be found about the VEIL visions on the VEIL website. If you are involved with a local environmental visioning project you are welcome to post information about your work on Sustainable Melbourne. To do so visit the “How to use this site” page and follow the prompts.



Human Effect: Public Installation

Posted in Events, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on October 9th, 2012

11 October , 2012 7:00 pmto27 October , 2012 12:00 am

Presented by Experimenta in association with Melbourne Festival

Yandell Walton (Australia)

HUMAN EFFECT

IN A QUIET SIDE STREET, IN THE HEART OF THE CBD, A LITTLE PIECE OF THE CONCRETE JUNGLE HAS BEEN RECLAIMED BY THE WILD. BUT THIS DELICATE NEW GROWTH, VULNERABLE AND EPHEMERAL, CANNOT SURVIVE OUR DESTRUCTIVE TOUCH.

Accomplished projection installation artist Yandell Walton has collaborated with animator Tobias J Edwards and software developer Jayson Haebich to bring Festival-goers a spectacular new interactive artwork.

Mapping the contours of an urban laneway, Walton repurposes it as a canvas for a series of vibrantly animated projections, creating a paradise of verdant growth. Flowering vines twine up pipes, moss and ferns spread across the walls, while vividly coloured butterflies alight on window ledges.

An echo of ages before human inhabitation, the scene entices viewers to move closer: an approach that sees the new life wither and slowly die, destroyed by the human presence, only to be renewed once more in a riot of foliage and motion as viewers move away.

Make the discovery of this remarkable loop of growth and decay, a visual arts gem hidden amid Melbourne’s secluded backstreets and laneways.

>>Find out more here.


CERES Global working with Women’s groups in India

Posted in Movements, Visions by ceres on August 14th, 2012

Women cooking pirchandikulum

Each year CERES Global spends 6 weeks in India and invites interested people to join us on a socio-environmental and cultural journey focused on mutual learning and exchange. As a past participant explains, “I took away a sense of humanity of possibility, a beautiful sense of how big the world is”.

CERES Global works with communities and organisations in India to generate solutions that are community driven and meet the needs identified by members of the community. Project sustainability is a key aspect of successfully engaging with communities and projects are designed and implemented with these principles in mind.

We will be holding a number of information sessions for people interested in learning more about our trips and how they can get involved:

Information sessions
6.30pm 23rd August
6.30pm 20th September
6.30pm 18th October
6.30pm 8th November

All information sessions are held in the CERES Eco house, crn Roberts and Stewart Streets, East Brunswick, VIC (enter via the Lee street gates). Please RSVP to the contacts below

For more information contact Sophie on – (03) 9389 0183 or ceresglobal@ceres.org.au
Or visit our website http://www.ceres.org.au/global

Our projects in India, often involve working with women’s groups. A past participant explains her experience:

Read the rest of this entry »


VEIL Exhibition: Sunshine 2032, Stage three

Posted in Events, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on June 12th, 2012

13 June , 2012 10:00 amto17 June , 2012 5:00 pm


Image credit: Jack Pu

The city of Sunshine was designed according to the principles of Ebenezer Howard’s Garden City. The suburban layout combined back yards adequate for a vegetable patch, fruit trees and chickens, with regularly placed public parks for social recreation. The layout remains intact today, but the expansion of transport infrastructure over the years has fractured much of the social space in the suburb. The Garden City layout of Sunshine is suited to the intensification of sustainable programs including urban agriculture, shared water and energy harvesting systems, increased pedestrian and bike access through the neighbourhood and shared public spaces for increased social cohesion.

Following on from our exhibition of ‘Vision: Sunshine 2032’ projects in 2011, VEIL took the design process further and held the studio in the community as a Studio Atelier. Sunshine Plaza Shopping Centre generously provided a vacant shop for the duration of the semester, and we constructed the furnishings as we went along. Being in Sunshine every week has allowed us to become better acquainted with the project sites, the community, and the experience of working, shopping, eating and travelling in the area.  The studio door has literally been kept open, and we have had locals and past residents come in to speak to us, deliver brief lectures on the area, and request inclusions in the projects. VEIL hopes to continue using the Studio Atelier as a model for teaching and co-creating innovative design projects for the future.

This exhibition of selected design projects, developed as part of the Victorian Eco-Innovation Lab (VEIL) Eco-Acupuncture studio program 2009-2012, includes selected Architecture and Landscape Architecture Design projects envisioning a sustainable future for Sunshine [stage one, two and three].

13 – 17 June
Shop 34, Sunshine Plaza 324-328 Hampshire Rd Sunshine
Open Wednesday-Sunday 10am-5pm.

Exhibition launched by Professor Philip Goad, Director of the Melbourne School of Design, Faculty of Architecture Building and Planning, University of Melbourne.

www.ecoinnovationlab.com


Streetscape Raingarden Design Principles: Guide

Posted in Models, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on May 28th, 2012


From the reference guide.
-

Sourced from Clearwater :

This A3 Quick Reference Guide will introduce the reader to the basics of streetscape raingarden design. The guide indentifies the critical elements for a good design as well as some tips for what to watch out for. Links are provided for more technical guidance and to video clips on how to build a raingarden.

http://www.clearwater.asn.au/content/streetscape-raingarden-design-principles


CERES Global: Travel with Purpose

Posted in Events, Seeking, Visions by ceres on May 2nd, 2012

3 May , 2012
6:30 pmto8:00 pm
24 May , 2012
6:30 pmto8:00 pm

CERES Global is offering the opportunity for students and professionals interested in areas of environment, sustainability, community development, global equity, health and education to travel to Indonesia in July this year and contribute to local village societies by sharing skills in a range of community engagement areas.

To find out more attend and Information Session

Thursday 3rd May 6.30pm
Thursday 24th May 6.30pm

All information sessions are held in the CERES Eco house, Crn Roberts and Stewarts Streets, East Brunswick.

Alternatively, you can read more information below.

Background to CERES
CERES is an environmental community organisation in East Brunswick, Melbourne. It has become an icon of locally based education and action on environmental and social justice issues. CERES aims to create awareness and action on issues of environmental sustainability and social equity – engaging the community in the process and celebrating the diversity of cultures making up our local community and world.

Background to CERES Global
CERES Global is a project within CERES aiming to engage with the issue of global inequities and the well being of all people on the planet and the environments in which they live. CERES Global runs trips India, Indonesia and Arnhem Land with the aim to engage Australian people with the issues of developing countries whilst enjoying the richness of their cultures and the wisdoms they can add to our understanding of sustainable wellbeing. The trips are also valuable in establishing ongoing relationships and links between remote communities and the resources and skills of our part of the world.

Indonesia 1 – 17th July 2012
This cultural volunteer program offers interested people the opportunity to take part in a socio-environmental and cultural journey focused on mutual learning and exchange. The aim of the trip is to harness connections and build cross cultural friendships, share ideas, skills and experiences, and create understanding between people from diverse backgrounds. Travellers will experience daily village life and work alongside community organisations implementing fresh approaches to sustainability and community development.

Most of our time in Indonesia will be spent working alongside the organisation Yayasan Usaha Mulia (YUM)

“Yum’s community based projects aim to provide a better standard of living for those families living in poverty. They work in a number of sectors including water and sanitation, agriculture and microcredit for women. YUM aims to create a foundation for long-term stability and growth by promoting cooperation between members of each community and show communities what can be achieved when they work together.” 

How participants can get involved:

  • English teaching (kindergarten to adult)
  • English teacher training
  • Organic/permaculture farming/training
  • Community Library activities
  • Environmental/outdoor education
  • Art, drama, dance, sport, music classes
  • Waste Education (project development and implementation with staff)
  • Maternal Health
  • Recycling program
  • Possibly – researching the implementation of hydro electricity generation (they already have the site and plans, but no funding or feasibility study)
  • Organise activities and workshops with the local community (mostly children) or with the YUM staff
  • Undertaking maintenance around the grounds

CERES provides a fully supported program including pre-trip information sessions and post-trip debriefs. We organise all internal transport, accommodation, and food and facilitate projects with the groups we visit. We will even help you raise funds to get over there.

Please note that there is a cost to participate in this program of $2000 including all internal food, accommodation and transport. This does not include flights to and from Indonesia.

How to express interest

To get involved and for more information please contact Sophie with your area of interest:

Email: ceresglobal@ceres.org.au

Phone: 03 9389 0183

Or visit our website: http://www.ceres.org.au/global/exchange/indonesia


A smart and resilient water system for a liveable, sustainable and productive Melbourne

Posted in Policies, Research, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on April 26th, 2012


Image from the Implementation Plan summary

The Living Melbourne, Living Victoria Roadmap was released in March 2011. It outlined the recommended priorities for reform to support achievement of the Government’s objectives for urban water. The newly released Living Melbourne Living Victoria Implementation Plan outlines the [Ministerial Advisory Council] MAC’s final recommendations for changes needed to the urban water system to achieve a more sustainable, liveable Melbourne and Victoria.

From “Sense breaks through water debate” by Carolyn Boyd:

[A] new report in Victoria finds this: “the current system does not adequately support the use of alternative water sources (e.g. rainwater and storm water) for non-drinking needs”.

[…]

Among a raft of other suggestions, the findings push for stronger building controls to catch stormwater at its source and store it – in some cases in rainwater tanks at properties, and in others in storage tanks big enough for a whole urban precinct. When we have situations where more storm water flows out of a city each year than the city consumes (as is the case in Melbourne), it does seem crazy not to be tapping into the stuff as it falls from the sky.

The strategy aims to reduce the demand for mains water by using stormwater for non-drinking functions such as flushing toilets and washing clothes, and continues to support greater water efficiency in homes through low-use appliances and tap fittings.

The report suggests improved standards should apply to all new and significantly renovated buildings in Victoria. The report models the outcomes of capturing more storm water and provides some interesting insights. One of the scenarios uses a combination of enhanced household water efficiency and rainwater tanks to provide water for toilets, laundry and gardens. In this scenario, mains water was assumed to be used for personal washing and in the kitchen.

The modelling estimated these changes would cut potable water demand by 24 per cent, and lead to a 9 per cent drop in stormwater runoff and an 11 per cent fall in the amount of wastewater being discharged across greater Melbourne by 2050.

In another scenario, domestic rainwater was used for hot water and laundry, while storm water was collected and stored at a precinct or suburb-level, and supplied to households for toilet flushing and gardens. The modelling shows the above would deliver a 38 per cent cut in mains water demand, an 11 per cent drop ?in stormwater runoff and a 32 per cent fall in the wastewater being discharged across greater Melbourne by 2050.

Putting the argument for better water collection in residences, the report noted that larger infrastructure, such as dams and desal plants had a “lumpy, long lead time” and run “much higher risks of saddling customers and/or taxpayers with excessive or unneeded investment” – as many residents across Australia are arguing they are now finding with various desalination plants.

Read the full article by Carolyn Boyd, or read more about Living Melbourne, Living Victoria.


Blog of the Year Competition: Renew

Posted in Seeking, Visions by sashashtargot on December 19th, 2011

Calling all keen sustainability e-scribes! Enter your blog in ReNew Magazine’s Blog of the Year Competition for your chance to win a pair of 110-watt solar panels! We’re looking for blogs about sustainable homes on a budget, energy efficiency, DIY projects or wider issues to do with climate change or environmental policy. The blog should provide new details or insights for those seeking information on sustainability and should have been regularly updated in 2011.

To enter, simply email renew@ata.org.au with your blog’s URL, your contact details, your goals when you started blogging on this topic and a little about your audience, such as their age bracket, skill levels and level of engagement with you and your blog.

Email entries (under 200 words) to renew@ata.org.a

Entries close Friday, February 3, 2012. For more details: www.renew.org.au


Vision Sunshine 2032: VEIL Exhibition

Posted in Events, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on December 2nd, 2011

6 December , 2011 10:00 amto11 December , 2011 5:00 pm

This exhibition is being hosted by the Victorian Eco Innovation Lab (VEIL). It includes work from University of Melbourne Architecture and Landscape Architecture studios envisioning a sustainable future for Sunshine, as well as a selection of student works from previous studios as part of VEIL’s Eco-Acupuncture studio program 2009-2011.

The exhibition will be launched by Professor Thomas Kvan, Dean, Faculty of Architecture Building and Planning, University of Melbourne.

6 – 11 December
Shop 51, Sunshine Plaza Shopping Centre
324-328 Hampshire Rd
Sunshine

The exhibition is easy to get to via public transport. Download a map.

Open Tuesday-Sunday 10am-5pm.

Sustainable Melbourne is a VEIL project.


Queen of the Sun: Film Screening

Posted in Events, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on September 20th, 2011

4 October , 2011
6:00 pmto8:00 pm

http://www.rosshouse.org.au/node/162


Green Your Laneway: City of Melbourne Guide

Posted in Models, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on September 14th, 2011

Source: City of Melbourne


Photo by Tokyo Green Space

Green Your Laneway

Do you live or work off a laneway? Are you interested in laneway greening? Anyone can improve their laneway for the benefit of everyone. Many people in the central city don’t have traditional gardens but that doesn’t mean you can’t have any plants. There are many opportunities to green your home or business; you just need to know where to start. Green Your Laneway is a guide to inform laneway communities on greening using planter boxes, wall creepers and green roofs and walls within their properties.

The article includes links and further information:

  • What can I green?
  • What can I plant in my laneway garden?
  • Have you considered maintenance?
  • Do I need permission for greening?
  • Have you considered access and safety?
  • Are you seeking funding?  (!!!)
Check out the page on the CoM website for more information, and check out Tokyo Green Space for more inspiration.


Photo by Tokyo Green Space



Photo by Tokyo Green Space