Archive for the ‘Models’ Category

Models refer to existing sustainable models or frameworks of action that are occurring in Melbourne. A model could possibly be applied elsewhere in a different context. For example, “permablitz” is a model of urban agriculture installation that many people are applying in different parts of Victoria. Sustainable Melbourne strongly encourages environmental organisations and institutions to post their own environmental initiatives (ie. “models”) on the site to share with others. To do so visit the “How to use this site” page and follow the prompts.

Premier’s Sustainability Award Winners 2013

Posted in Models, Movements by Jessica Bird on October 28th, 2013


From the media release ‘Moonee Valley City Council and Wingate Avenue Community Centre win Premier’s top sustainability award‘:

A project by Moonee Valley City Council and Wingate Avenue Community Centre has won the top Premier’s Recognition Award in the Premier’s Sustainability Awards 2013 for introducing recycling to a community housing estate. The Ascot Vale Housing Estate Household Recycling project defied previous failed attempts to introduce recycling and established a successful, ground-breaking model using targeted and broad-ranging community engagement of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) and lower Socio Economic Status (SES) groups.

The project won the Community category of the awards and then went on to win the night’s overall award. […]

Sustainability Victoria CEO, Stan Krpan, congratulated the Moonee Valley City Council and Wingate Avenue Community Centre project team for their innovative work which delivered recycling to estate’s residents, of whom 55 per cent were born overseas. “A key initiative of this project was the focus on engaging residents from many cultural backgrounds with varying competency in English, in the importance of recycling,” he said. In its first six months, 52 tonnes of recyclables were recovered. Three of the 11 residents who worked on the project secured jobs as a result of their experience.

Now in their eleventh year, the Premier’s Sustainability Awards celebrate efficient use of water, resources and energy, better waste management and recycling practices, the enhancement of the environment and effective, practical community action. The full list of winners of the Premier’s Sustainability Awards 2013 are:

The Premier’s Recognition Award – Moonee Valley City Council and Wingate Avenue Community Centre, taking recycling to public housing residents
The Premier’s Regional Recognition Award – Victoria Carpets, for their work in energy and emissions reduction in their Bendigo plant
Innovative Products or Services Award – ModWood Technologies for development of Flame Shield®, a wood-plastic composite for building in bushfire areas
Infrastructure and Buildings Award – RMIT University for their Swanston Academic Building: a progressive tertiary learning environment
Environmental Protection Award – Mallee Catchment Management Authority’s project: Restoring the balance in the drought-riven Hattah Lakes
Education Award – Bentleigh Secondary College – a world recognised, very sustainable school
Small and Medium Enterprises Award – Rae-Line for embedding sustainability practices in manufacturing soft trim components for trucks
Large Business Award – Victoria Carpets
Community Award – Moonee Valley City Council and Wingate Avenue Community Centre.

>>> For more information on the winners and finalist entries visit the Premier’s Sustainability Awards website.

Urban food security, urban resilience and climate change: Australian report

Posted in Models, Research by Kate Archdeacon on August 2nd, 2013

Guerrilla Garden_fullyreclined_BY
Photo by fullyreclined via flickr CC

The National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF) report on urban food and climate change is now available for download.

Food security is increasingly recognised as a problem in developed countries like Australia as well as in developing countries of the global south, and as a problem facing cities and urban populations in these countries. Despite producing more food than is consumed in Australia, certain groups in particular, places are finding it increasingly difficult to access nutritious and healthy food at affordable prices. Moreover, whole urban populations have found their food supply lines severely compromised by major disasters such as floods and cyclones which are expected to have greater impacts as the climate changes.

This changing landscape of food production, distribution and consumption has drawn attention to the nature of contemporary urban food systems in general and to the security and resilience of urban food systems in particular. This has in turn highlighted the extent of urban agriculture and its potential to play a greater role in strengthening the food security of Australian cities and building urban resilience in a changing climate.

This report presents the results of a synthesis and integrative research project that explored these issues through a critical review of relevant literature and case study research in two cities. It had three main aims:

  • to increase our knowledge of the current extent of urban agriculture in Australian cities;
  • to review its capacity to play a more prominent role in enhancing urban food security and urban resilience and;
  • to assess the impacts of climate change on the capacity of urban agriculture to enhance food security and urban resilience.

The research provides much needed up-to-date information on the extent of current urban agricultural practices, a critical review of good practice in Australia and beyond and an analysis of the opportunities and barriers to the expansion of these practices, especially in the face of climate change.

Visit the website to download the full report.

Please cite this report as:
Burton, P, Lyons, K, Richards, C, Amati, M, Rose, N, Desfours, L, Pires, V, Barclay, R, 2013, Urban food security, urban resilience and climate change, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, Gold Coast, pp.176.

Future Housing in Melbourne – Discussion paper

Posted in Models, Seeking by Kate Archdeacon on July 2nd, 2013

Pages from future_living_discussion_paper

From the City of Melbourne website:

The City of Melbourne is growing quickly. By 2031, it is estimated that an additional 42,000 homes will be built within the municipality to house an additional 80,000 people. Our aspiration is for an inner and central city where housing is affordable, well-designed and meets the diverse needs of our residents. Our housing will play a critical role in realising our urban renewal areas as sustainable, liveable and welcoming places for future living.

Future Living opens a discussion on the role of the City of Melbourne and other key influencers, including the Australian and Victorian Governments, developers, investors and residents in meeting these goals.

>>> You can download the discussion paper from the City of Melbourne website.
>>> You can participate in the discussion and find out about the ‘Future Living’ pop up homes online.

Dehydrator in Degraves Street

Posted in Models by Kate Archdeacon on June 24th, 2013

Photo by avlxyz via Flickr CC

From Enterprise Melbourne:

The City of Melbourne is working with businesses in Degraves Street and Centre Place to implement a shared recycling program, which aims to divert plastics, paper, cardboard, aluminum, glass and organic waste from commercial bins. The waste materials are collected from the businesses and processed on site at the Degraves Street Recycling Facility in Ross House, which hosts a food waste dehydrator, a cardboard baler and co-mingled recycling bins. [The dehydrator turns organic waste into pellets that can then be used as compost for gardens. -JB] The objective of the project is to increase recycling and promote positive environmental outcomes within the Degraves Street precinct.  The project will reduce the environmental and amenity impacts of waste collection and disposal in this busy and popular area of the city. The Degraves Street Recycling Facility is a demonstration project jointly funded by the City of Melbourne and Metropolitan Waste Management Group.

>>> The Degraves Street Recycling Facility is located in Ross House.
>>> You can read the original article on Enterprise Melbourne.

Get smart: ATA’s Consumer guide to smart Meters

Posted in Models, Research by Jessica Bird on June 17th, 2013

Source: The Alternative Technology Association

ata_consumer_guide_to smart_meters

The Alternative Technology Association’s (ATA) Consumer Guide to Smart Meters helps households and small businesses understand and take advantage of products and services associated with smart meters. The guide provides easy-to-understand information. Some of the smart meter products and services exist now, and some are expected to become available in the next two to three years.

>>> You can download the guide from the ATA’s website.

Living Green Workshops at CERES

Posted in Models by Kate Archdeacon on June 5th, 2013

Have a look at this screen grab of some of the workshops coming up at CERES – they just get better and better.
What are you doing on the weekend?

CERES Workshops

>> download the March-June 2013 brochure 

Singing the Changes? Melbourne Mussel Choir

Posted in Models, Research, Visions by Kate Archdeacon on May 27th, 2013

The ATA flagged this project in their recent ReNew newsletter as being worth a look, and we agree!

Melbourne mussel choir_Natalie Jeremijenko
Photo: Natalie Jeremijenko

From the Melbourne Mussel Choir:

The Melbourne Mussel Choir enables members of the public to monitor and celebrate the tremendous environmental services these organisms can provide.

Carbon Arts is working with the Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) and artist Natalie Jeremijenko to realise her concept for a public artwork that uses marine organisms to collect data about and represent the real-time water quality – or, as Jeremijenko, likes to call it, the Qualities of Water – of the Melbourne Docklands’ aquatic ecosystem.

One mussel can filter as much as 6-9 litres of water/ hour. By instrumenting mussels with hall effect sensors, which indicate the opening and closing of their shells, and by giving them each a voice, converting the data into sound, the artwork uses the behavior of the organisms themselves as a biologically meaningful measure of pollutant exposure in order to produce a public spectacle.

Storm water run-off, local weather, and seasons will have evident effects on the Choir’s performances. The songs will map parameters such as water depth to sound pitch, presence of pollutants to sound timbre, and the rate of the opening and closing of mussel shells to sound tempo, for example. The mussels will become rock stars.

Planning work has begun with a final launch expected in 2014. The Melbourne Mussel Choir was the winning work of the Echology: Making Sense of Data initiative, a partnership between Carbon Arts, the Australian Network of Art and Technology and developer, Lend Lease.


Compost Revolution: Online Quiz and Tutorial

Posted in Models by Kate Archdeacon on May 20th, 2013

Image: Compost Revolution

The Mount Alexander Shire Council has signed up for a Compost Revolution – your ‘one-stop-shop for composting and wormfarming':

“Composting and wormfarming is easy to do and prevents the wasteful transport of food scraps to landfill where they produce harmful greenhouse gases. You can halve your rubbish and return vital nutrients to the soil to grow your veggies in. You can learn all the basics of composting and wormfaring at our online tutorial, then take the quiz.

After that [if you live in Mt Alexander] you’re eligible for a discounted compost bin or worm farm!

The Compost Revolution is a community initiative that promotes home composting, growing food locally and connecting with your neighbours. Get involved, learn, test yourself and start turning food scraps into healthy soil for growing food.”


Royal Park Stormwater Harvesting: Case Study

Posted in Models by Kate Archdeacon on May 17th, 2013

Photo: Michael Wright, David Simmonds via Landezine

It’s nearly winter and hopefully time to replenish some of our urban water sources.  Clearwater has recently published a great case study on the Royal Park Stormwater Harvesting project, which has evolved since its launch in 2006:

“The 1984 Royal Park Master Plan proposed the development of a wetland, which would provide a range of benefits to the local community. In 1998, following on from this preliminary idea, a stormwater harvesting system was included in the Master Plan, and the conceptual design was finalised in 2004. When Melbourne hosted the Commonwealth Games in 2006, there was a strong push for environmental initiatives. Given that the chosen site for the Athlete’s Village was adjacent to the proposed wetland location, the construction of the Village became the main driver to implement the wetland and stormwater harvesting project. It was completed in time for the 2006 Commonwealth Games and the area was included in the secure recreation zone of the Athlete’s Village.

Stormwater is diverted from an open Melbourne Water stormwater drain, which collects water from a 187ha catchment area. The diversion structure, which also acts as a sediment trap, allows only low flows into the constructed wetland which is 0.8ha in size. The treated water then flows into a 12ML storage basin, which allows overflow into Moonee Ponds Creek. This storage space was supplemented in 2008 by a 5ML underground tank, situated below one of the sporting fields. To ensure the water is fit-for-purpose, it is treated with UV light and held in a distribution tank prior to use for irrigation of the neighbouring golf course, sports ovals and parkland. To minimise human health risks, the water is applied at night-time through spray irrigation. The system has a back-up supply with a connection to potable mains water. Two water hydrants are also located in an adjacent street to allow trucks to fill up and use the treated water for irrigation of streetscape features.”

Read the full article on Clearwater’s site for more details and great pictures, or to download the case study as a PDF.


Making Cities: A Synopsis of the Melbourne Roundtable Event

Posted in Models by missleeder on April 19th, 2013

Degraves II_¡kuba!_BY_NC_SA
Photo by ¡kuba! via flickr CC

The IFPH (International Foundation for Housing and Planning) are celebrating their centenary this year, with a series of worldwide events to discuss important urban design matters from local to global scale. They are focusing on the seven foundations they see to be crucial to creating more sustainable cities: ‘Making Cities: Smarter, Grow Green, Climate Resilient, Healthier, Globally Connected, Socially Cohesive and Safe and Secure.’

Melbourne was the location for the ‘Making Cities: Safer?‘ Roundtable event, moderated by Dr.Soren Smidt-Jensen of the Danish Architecture Centre, with panellists Jan Gehl (Gehl Architects,Denmark), Rob Adams (Director of City Design, City of Melbourne Council), Hugh Nicholson (Principal Urban Designer at Christchurch City Council, New Zealand) and Khoo Teng Chye (Centre for Liveable Cities (CLC), Singapore). An easy camaraderie, ensuing, no doubt from their numerous walking tours around the city in the previous days, added to the enjoyment of the evening.

Some key themes were addressed; the importance of both Government and Community approaches, the Docklands, small versus big developers, strategic retreats and most pertinently for its location, the implications, problems and ideas for Melbourne’s predicted growth.

This intriguing latter topic was expansive with ideas; one being the threat that a lack of social cohesion can have during growth, leading to a disparate city of the ‘haves and have-nots,’ according to Rob, who suggested mixed use, public realm, good connectivity and local character instead. Another threat, to both the aforementioned mixed use and public realm qualities, as well as active street frontages, was raised; that being the demise of the high street shop, in part due to supermarkets, the internet and out of town malls. Jan suggested new opportunities could arise from this, such as spaces for smaller scale businesses, voluntary organisations and creative outlets, whilst acknowledging that these would involve a new type of tenancy, and to a certain degree, economy. The work of Renew was mentioned as showing viable alternatives and opportunities to combat this issue, whilst Rob implored a move away from our current throw-away culture, to better, longer lasting products.

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