Archive for October, 2012

Sunshine in 2032: Short Films from VEIL

Posted in Visions by Kate Archdeacon on October 31st, 2012

In February 2011, the Victorian Eco Innovation Lab (VEIL) released a series of one-minute films showcasing the work of design students and practitioners looking at a sustainable future for Melbourne.  Now VEIL has released another set of short movies, this time focusing on the suburb of Sunshine, in Melbourne’s West.  The films show work from landscape architecture and architecture students at the University of Melbourne.  Check them out on the VEIL website or on Vimeo!

Sustainable Melbourne is a project of the Victorian Eco Innovation Lab.


PlantCatching: Website for sharing garden stuff

Posted in Models by Kate Archdeacon on October 29th, 2012


Ever wonder what to do with all your spare herb cuttings, or plants that have outlived their time in your limited garden space?   Nicolas Cadilhac, in Montreal, has developed a website to help with just these issues – PlantCatching.

PlantCatching connects you with gardeners in your area and lets you do two very simple things:

1. Find plants, seeds and bulbs, gardening materials and even fruits and vegetables given by fellow gardeners, either anonymously in a public area, or personally at or near their property.

2. Share your passion by giving your plants, seeds, bulbs and your own harvest crops so that existing members of the site or even passers-by can catch, plant and admire them, or eat them.

The site works here in Melbourne, although it’s sparsely populated at the moment.

http://plantcatching.com/en


How to build a raingarden: Workshop

Posted in Events by kheffer on October 26th, 2012

30 October , 2012
4:30 pmto6:30 pm

Hobsons Bay City Council’s My Smart Garden program helps residents use their backyards or balconies to grow their own food, shade their homes, use water wisely and recycle wastes.  For more free events, gardening advice, prizes and discounts from local nurseries join My Smart Garden at www.mysmartgarden.org.au


Raingardens popping up at tram and bus Stops

Posted in Models, Movements by Jessica Bird on October 25th, 2012

Source: Melbourne Water


Photo by Melbourne Water via flickr CC

From the Melbourne Water media release ‘Be part of the count toward 10,000 Raingardens

A new public awareness campaign is encouraging Melburnians to build stormwater-filtering ‘raingardens’ to prevent pollution from entering our rivers and creeks. As part of Melbourne Water’s 10,000 Raingardens campaign, commuters will sit among larger-than-life raingarden simulations at tram stops across Melbourne, showing how easily they can help protect local waterways at home.

General Manager Waterways, David Ryan, said stormwater pollution was the biggest threat to the health of the region’s 8400km of rivers and creeks, with the problem increasing the more Melbourne grew. “Stormwater damages our waterways in two ways: by picking up and transporting pollutants and causing erosion,” said Mr Ryan. “Stormwater run-off is the number one polluter of rivers and creeks because of the pollution it carries, such as litter, chemicals and excess nutrients. In urban areas, stormwater runoff flows much faster and there is a lot more of it, compared with undeveloped areas, which causes river bank erosion and threatens the habitat of native animals such as platypus and fish. Raingardens capture stormwater and filter it through layers of sandy soil and plants, which helps slow the rate of runoff to reduce erosion and absorb pollutants that would otherwise end up in rivers and creeks,” he said.

Melbourne Water’s Raingardens campaign aims to see 10,000 raingardens built across Melbourne backyards by 2013.

You can read the full media release here. For more information on raingardens, or how to build one visit raingardens.melbournewater.com.au

 

[Keep an eye out for the raingardens at tram and bus stops across Melbourne. Good places to start include, St Kilda Road, Chadstone Shopping Centre, St Kilda Junction, near Camberwell Market, and the bus exchange in Moonee Ponds. – JB]


Training for Transition: Outer Eastern Suburbs

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on October 24th, 2012

27 October , 2012
28 October , 2012


Beginners’ Bike Maintenance Workshop

Posted in Events by EcoCentre on October 24th, 2012

27 October , 2012
2:00 pmto4:00 pm

Sat 27 October, 2pm
St Kilda Foreshore Bikepath, on the foreshore outside of SeaBaths

Get your pushie in gear and become more confident tinkering with your  clean, green machine.  This workshop will equip you with the basics to keep your bike in good repair.

Learn how to ”fix it yourself”.

Content will cover:

  • getting the right seat height
  • fixing punctures and fitting tubes
  • bike chain maintenance
  • fine tuning gears

$10 person. Bookings and pre-payment essential.

Enquiries and bookings: 9534 0670 / paula@ecocentre.com
Venue: St Kilda Foreshore bikepath, outside Seabaths


Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037

Posted in Research, Visions by Jessica Bird on October 23rd, 2012


Image by D. Armellin

A local resilience-building project about climate extremes.

Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 is part of a larger research project Transforming Institutions for Climate Extremes. This project is led by Che Biggs at the Victorian Eco-Innovation Lab (VEIL) at the University of Melbourne. It aims to understand how communities and institutions can prepare and become more resilient to disruptive climate conditions. Anglesea was chosen as an ideal case-study site because it faces multiple climate hazards such as fire, drought and sea level rise but it also has a creative community and a strong local identity.

What is the Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 blog about?

The images and articles you see on the Visions of Resilience: Anglesea 2037 blog are glimpses of possible futures. They depict strategies and ideas about how Anglesea could become more resilient to the more extreme possible impacts of climate change. The ideas represented have been developed from a workshop involving Anglesea community members. In the workshop people were asked to propose adaptation strategies in response to a series of challenging future scenarios that describe Anglesea in the year 2037. These scenarios were built from an assessment of climate model projections, historical records from along the Great Ocean Road and interviews with Anglesea residents. The small number of glimpses you see were combined and synthesised from more than 100 ideas developed in the workshop. Treat them as a window into a range of possible futures that might exist. We encourage you to comment on what is good or not good about the way they respond to challenges from climate change.

Why this project? When managing disaster risk, government and private sector organisations often rely heavily on ‘probability’ or ‘expert’ assessments of the likely type, extent and frequency of negative impacts. This can come unstuck when disasters occur outside what has been predicted and planned for. Transforming Institutions for Climate Extremes is a response to this problem. It responds to the call for new methods to improve community resilience and help communities improve disaster planning. It seeks to explore how prepared our communities, our decision-makers and decision-making processes are for the challenges of ‘new’ climate conditions. It will consider what institutional changes are needed to meet those challenges whilst ensuring community ownership.

Climate change in Anglesea? Anglesea lies in an area of southern Australia that will be affected by climate change in many ways. Climate models project that the most likely direct impacts will include changes to rainfall (drier but with more intense rainfall events), changes in temperature (warmer with more heatwaves), increasing acidity of oceans and rising sea levels. In-turn, these impacts are expected to affect a whole range of factors including increases in coastal erosion and days of extreme fire danger to increased risk of heat-stroke and changes to when plants flower and birds migrate. Climate Change is the effect of heat from the sun being trapped in the Earth’s atmosphere by gases produced by human activity. While some of these gases (like carbon dioxide) are found naturally in the atmosphere, as we increase their concentration above natural levels, they trap more heat from the sun – a bit like an insulation blanket.

You can view the glimpses of a resilient Anglesea in 2037 and comment at www.anglesea2037.com. You can also like the Facebook page to be kept up to date with the project.


Community-Supported Agriculture + Supermarket: Cairns

Posted in Models, Movements by Kate Archdeacon on October 19th, 2012


Real Food Network produce at a local farmers’ market

The Real Food Network in Cairns, North Queensland, has been providing members with weekly boxes of locally-grown, mostly organic and biodynamic fruit and veggies for a couple of years in a community-supported agriculture (CSA) model.  This effort alone benefits a community that is regularly cut off, by cyclones and floods, from a food supply chain that depends on north-south travel along the coast.

Now the Network has gone further in establishing local food systems, setting up a community based supermarket in collaboration with a disability employment service, Ostara.  Real Food Plus employs clients of Ostara, with the shop’s fit-out and decor built by the staff from recycled and reclaimed materials.  The supermarket is a pick-up point for CSA boxes, but also sells surplus from the farmers (and backyard growers) direct to the public and provides members with the opportunity to add a few extras as they go.

Reminding us once again that farmers are worth their weight in gold, below is the list of what’s available in the box and in the shop (and who grew it) this week:

IN THE BOX:

– Organic Sebago Potato, Kenneth, Kaban
– Homegrown Zucchini, Beetroots, Les & Bettie, Biboohra
– Biodynamic Russian Garlic, John and Adam, Kaban
– Organic Tomatoes, Lena, Koah
– Koah gold Oranges, Big Bulky Watermelon, Bruno and Carlo, Koah
– Cert. Organic Limes, Mint & Chokos Vi and Stan, Red Hill
– Basil, Vince and Kerri, Paddy´s Green
– Organic baby Bak Choi or Organic Baby Buk Choi or Organic Choy sum, (Asian Veggies)
– SkyBurry Red Paw Paw, Paddy´s Green
– Pineapple, Stephen, paddy’s Green
– White & also Red Onions, Arilo (Vince’s brother) Channal Road.
– Silverbeet, Vince, Spring Creek
– Organic Lettuce, Thom, Closey River

IN THE SHOP IN CAIRNS : (the list above PLUS the list below !)

– Organic Parsley
– Watermelons, Koah, Bruno.
– Organic Star Apple, Speewah, Chrystel
– Organic Black Sapote, Kuranda, Matt
– Organic Eggplant, Organic Tomatoes, Organic greens, Machans Beach, Jez
– Organic Kipfler, Kaban, Kenneth
– Organic Asian Veggies 3 varieties above(!), Organic Daikon, (and more Organic Thai Eggplant Faces),White Rock, Van
– Organic Spring Onions, Organic Sugar Bananas, Organic Spinach bagged, Organic Roma Tomatoes, Organic Choko’s, Tolga, Louie and Dianella (and Otto)
– Organic Tumeric, Ginger and garlic, various, Speewah.
– Yamagishi Happy Eggs, South Johnston, Yas
– Raw untreated Honey from Mareeba, John
– Butternut Pumpkin, Papa Miguel, Mutchilba.
– Discounted Oranges, Tomatoes, Bananas and Pawpaws and more coming in from your backyard.
– Plus lots more dried local fruit in the Pantry.
– Organic & Permaculture Eggplants, Organic Tomatillos, Organic Herbs and Salad Greens, Machans Beach, Jez & Allister.
– PLUS more of course.

>> www.realfoodnetwork.com.au

(Sadly they don’t service the Melbourne area, but you can join a local CSA – check out CERES’ Fair Food.)


‘Buy Nothing New’ Giftmaking Workshop

Posted in Events, Movements by EcoCentre on October 16th, 2012

20 October , 2012
2:00 pmto4:30 pm

Buy Nothing New this Christmas – and get thanked for it!!

There couldn’t be a better time to start gift-making than ‘Buy Nothing New Month’ (October) – a movement for conscientious consumption that highlights super alternatives to consuming more new stuff.

So, revive the true holiday spirit this year with a creative homemade gift, while cutting your costs.

This workshop will guide you through making several free, splendid gifts. Mix teas from dried herbs; create one-of-a-kind botanical cards from native pressed plants; create a puppet for the kids or a door snake out of recycled materials.

FREE workshop. Materials provided.

Saturday 20 October, 2pm-4.30pm
Port Phillip EcoCentre, St Kilda

Enquiries and bookings: 9534 0670 / paula@ecocentre.com
Venue: Port Phillip EcoCentre
Cnr Blessington & Herbert Streets, St Kilda
(adjacent St Kilda Botanic Gardens)

 

 


People’s Food Plan: Public Forum

Posted in Events by Kate Archdeacon on October 15th, 2012

21 October , 2012
2:00 pmto4:30 pm

 

>> Melbourne Forum October 21
>> Bendigo Forum October 24th